New Safety Deposit Box regulations?

CaptHenwayCaptHenway Posts: 22,925 ✭✭✭✭
My mother has a SDB at a Chase branch with one of my siblings as co-signers. Last week they got a letter outlining a number of changes to the lease agreement, including this:

"Contents of the box: You agree not to store any cash or coins other than those found to have a collectible value."

Another change is that signatures will no longer be accepted to access the box. The next time they go in they have to bring two forms of ID and they will be issued a four-digit pin number that will be used to access the box then and in the future.

Is this just Chase, or is it some new federal requirement?
Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.--Ben Franklin
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Comments

  • baseballbaseball Posts: 6,577 ✭✭✭
    At Bank of America, a drivers license is required to access, which feels kinda of sketchy in that "I feel like Big Brother is watching" sort of way. As for cash, what would be their reasoning and how would they know?

  • Timbuk3Timbuk3 Posts: 3,934 ✭✭✭
    Thanks for the heads-up !!! :-)
    Timbuk3
  • PerryHallPerryHall Posts: 34,469 ✭✭✭✭


    << <i>My mother has a SDB at a Chase branch with one of my siblings as co-signers. Last week they got a letter outlining a number of changes to the lease agreement, including this:

    "Contents of the box: You agree not to store any cash or coins other than those found to have a collectible value."

    Another change is that signatures will no longer be accepted to access the box. The next time they go in they have to bring two forms of ID and they will be issued a four-digit pin number that will be used to access the box then and in the future.

    Is this just Chase, or is it some new federal requirement? >>



    No more key? I wouldn't trust a lock with only a four digit pin.

  • jmski52jmski52 Posts: 17,970 ✭✭✭
    They won't allow bullion or cash? Wasn't that the reason for safe deposit boxes in the first place? You have to ask yourself, "what's the agenda this time around?"
    Q: Are You Printing Money? Bernanke: Not Literally

    I knew it would happen.
  • ProofmorganProofmorgan Posts: 305 ✭✭✭
    They want you to store your cash in their accounts so they can profit off of it. Dormant cash in your box does them no good.
    Perfect transactions with: TWQG, Metalsman, LukeMarshall, Oilstates2003, USMarine6, savoyspecial, piecesofme, natetrook
  • PerryHallPerryHall Posts: 34,469 ✭✭✭✭


    << <i>They won't allow bullion or cash? Wasn't that the reason for safe deposit boxes in the first place? You have to ask yourself, "what's the agenda this time around?" >>



    I'm guessing it's some kind of restriction aimed at money launderers and drug dealers. It's hard to collect taxes from the "underground economy" which is mostly based on cash transactions.
  • CaptHenwayCaptHenway Posts: 22,925 ✭✭✭✭
    I don't think they are getting rid of the keys. For one thing they would have to physically change the boxes. I assume that the PIN will be used to access the box rather than a signature, but how the PIN will be entered I have no idea.

    Should not affect bullion. As I read it they do not want people hoarding just plain cash.

    How they will know, I have no idea.
    Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.--Ben Franklin
  • OPAOPA Posts: 14,393 ✭✭✭


    << <i>

    << <i>They won't allow bullion or cash? Wasn't that the reason for safe deposit boxes in the first place? You have to ask yourself, "what's the agenda this time around?" >>



    I'm guessing it's some kind of restriction aimed at money launderers and drug dealers. It's hard to collect taxes from the "underground economy" which is mostly based on cash transactions. >>



    image
    "Bongo drive 1984 Lincoln that looks like old coin dug from ground."
  • BAJJERFANBAJJERFAN Posts: 27,816 ✭✭✭


    << <i>I don't think they are getting rid of the keys. For one thing they would have to physically change the boxes. I assume that the PIN will be used to access the box rather than a signature, but how the PIN will be entered I have no idea.

    Should not affect bullion. As I read it they do not want people hoarding just plain cash.

    How they will know, I have no idea. >>



    Security camera/s?
  • jmski52jmski52 Posts: 17,970 ✭✭✭
    Maybe they figure that since deposits will be paying low or no interest, the only way to drive money into the economy is to make it riskier to keep it stashed away and "out of the system".

    And then, there's the tax thing as usual.
    Q: Are You Printing Money? Bernanke: Not Literally

    I knew it would happen.
  • 291fifth291fifth Posts: 14,737 ✭✭✭✭


    << <i>Maybe they figure that since deposits will be paying low or no interest, the only way to drive money into the economy is to make it riskier to keep it stashed away and "out of the system".

    And then, there's the tax thing as usual. >>




    image
    All glory is fleeting.
  • BAJJERFANBAJJERFAN Posts: 27,816 ✭✭✭


    << <i>

    << <i>My mother has a SDB at a Chase branch with one of my siblings as co-signers. Last week they got a letter outlining a number of changes to the lease agreement, including this:

    "Contents of the box: You agree not to store any cash or coins other than those found to have a collectible value."

    Another change is that signatures will no longer be accepted to access the box. The next time they go in they have to bring two forms of ID and they will be issued a four-digit pin number that will be used to access the box then and in the future.

    Is this just Chase, or is it some new federal requirement? >>



    No more key? I wouldn't trust a lock with only a four digit pin. >>



    You probably have to enter it with a keyboard. Register on their intraweb site.
  • BAJJERFANBAJJERFAN Posts: 27,816 ✭✭✭


    << <i>

    << <i>They won't allow bullion or cash? Wasn't that the reason for safe deposit boxes in the first place? You have to ask yourself, "what's the agenda this time around?" >>



    I'm guessing it's some kind of restriction aimed at money launderers and drug dealers. It's hard to collect taxes from the "underground economy" which is mostly based on cash transactions. >>



    They will probably be on the lookout for cash withdrawals from your regular checking or savings accounts if you have direct deposit of wages.
  • WillieBoyd2WillieBoyd2 Posts: 3,071 ✭✭✭
    An old story.

    See the June 18, 2007 post "Bank Safe Deposit Box won't allow coins to be stored"
    http://forums.collectors.com/messageview.cfm?catid=26&threadid=592184

    The bank in the post is now owned by Chase.

    The PIN numbers are new and for signing in, the box is still accessed with the traditional key.

    image
    http://www.brianrxm.com
    The Mysterious Egyptian Magic Coin
    Coins in Movies and Television
    The San Francisco 1949 Peso

  • rickoricko Posts: 47,797 ✭✭✭✭✭
    In the event of a disaster, they will not honor claims for cash.... so it is 'uninsured' storage, should you choose to keep cash. Plus, the above, no profit in cash stored in SDB's... Cheers, RickO
  • brg5658brg5658 Posts: 2,047 ✭✭✭
    Sounds like something bank-specific. I haven't received any such information from the banks where I hold SDBs.

    My SDBs all require a 1) Key, 2) Photo ID, and 3) signature each time you wish to access the box.
    -Brandon

    My sets: [260+ horse coins] :: [France Sowers] :: [Colorful world copper] :: [Beautiful world coins]
    -~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-
  • keyman64keyman64 Posts: 13,186 ✭✭✭
    About 5+ years ago my Bank of America at the time built a new branch on the same property as the old branch and destroyed the old building for the parking lot etc. It was kinda nutty for a time. Anyway, the new SDB access is done by hand print biometrics + PIN/Box Number. That is to get into the vault. Once inside, a single key is used to open the box. There is no signing in, no showing identification....if the bank lobby is open then you have easy access to your box and don't have to have any human interaction. Besides my biometrics being stored, I loved it! It was so convenient. If I recall it has ALWAYS been that you are not allowed to store cash, guns, explosives, incidiary devices or anything flamable. That is NOT new.
    "If it's not fun, it's not worth it." - KeyMan64.

    Working on a TONED 1950-1964 PROOF SET. What do you have for me? image

  • TwoSides2aCoinTwoSides2aCoin Posts: 37,686 ✭✭✭✭
    I would store my cash where it would work for me. Those collectible coins and currency are "safe", though some think it is safe buried underground , under a mattress, or wherever. If it's a treasure it's safe there in a SDB.
    If it's in "hiding" because it's a "cash position", well there's your answer. You bet the FED and IRS want accounting of the cash. It was made for commerce for the most part. The TREASURES are treasured and the government isn't going after peoples' "treasures". The U.S. Treasury has mandates for the nations' money.

    I think banks are regulated by government with checks and balances as much as "WE THE PEOPLE" are kept in checks with balances. image Make sense ?
    If you don't understand me, don't fret. I just pay attention to being obedient in our system. Works for me. I work for it. Slaves to society. Put the Big Boy Pants on, kids.


    Pay your taxes. Save for a rainy day. A penny saved is a penny earned. A penny invested is a dollar earned. A penny hoarded is a penny just the same.
  • MrEurekaMrEureka Posts: 20,159 ✭✭✭
    Since there's no practical way to enforce the rule, there's no reason to expect actual compliance, so something else must be going on.

    I believe banks are obligated to report cash being held in a SDB, if they are aware of it. And Chase's demand that customers not stash their cash sounds mostly like a warning to their customers not to let any bank employees see the contents.
    Andy Lustig

    Doggedly collecting coins of the Central American Republic……………………...Visit the Society of US Pattern Collectors at USPatterns.com.

    image
  • derrybderryb Posts: 23,563 ✭✭✭✭
    there are no state or federal regulations concerning what can be stored in a safe deposit box. It is a contractual matter between the box renter and the institution that is renting out the box. Store what you wish, until something changes you are the only one that sees what goes in or out of the box.

    “Compound interest is the eighth wonder of the world. He who understands it, earns it ...he who doesn't ... pays it.” - Albert Einstein

  • s4nys4ny Posts: 1,427 ✭✭


    << <i>In the event of a disaster, they will not honor claims for cash.... so it is 'uninsured' storage, should you choose to keep cash. Plus, the above, no profit in cash stored in SDB's... Cheers, RickO >>



    Insurance for safe deposit boxes is already a murky area. This is the bank's way of stating that
    they have no liability. I seem to recall that Chase differentiates between "collectible coins" and "bullion coins."
  • ashelandasheland Posts: 6,094 ✭✭✭✭


    << <i>Thanks for the heads-up !!! :-) >>



    Agreed!
    Just another reason not to trust the banks, in my opinion! image
  • topstuftopstuf Posts: 7,776 ✭✭✭✭


    << <i>Since there's no practical way to enforce the rule, there's no reason to expect actual compliance, so something else must be going on.

    I believe banks are obligated to report cash being held in a SDB, if they are aware of it. And Chase's demand that customers not stash their cash sounds mostly like a warning to their customers not to let any bank employees see the contents. >>



    AHA!
    That may explain the new procedure my credit union has implemented.
    EVERYTHING in my box is in PCGS blue boxes. NOTHING is visibly identifiable.
    Even the bullion.

    image\

    BUT....this year they are INSISTING that I take the box into the "little room."
    It's a hassle as it is so heavy and ONE of their employees once DROPPED the box and one of the blue boxes scattered 1 oz golds all over the vault.
    That's a "CLOSE THE VAULT" situation.

    I objected to their new policy as it takes me appx. 4 seconds to stash or grab a blue box and drop the lid.
    But now I can see where COMPLETE secrecy is gonna be to MY benefit.

    Damn government. If ....they....didn't mismanage the monetary policies, we wouldn't even have to think about dealing with the "accomodation."

    (I do tell the employee who lets me into the box to stand outside the lil room as I will be BACK OUT in 7 seconds or less. image
  • TopographicOceansTopographicOceans Posts: 6,356 ✭✭✭✭
    Why would you want to store cash in a SDB?
    In the movies during the getaway they go get their passport and cash from the SDB.

    You can get your cash from your account during the same hours the bank is open.
    If there is a disaster, you won't be able to get cash from the bank or have access to your safe deposit box.

    Unless your cash comes from underground financial transactions I don't see any reason to store it in a SDB.
  • BAJJERFANBAJJERFAN Posts: 27,816 ✭✭✭
    Maybe a WAR ON CASH.

    From Money Metals Market Update via email today.


    Cash Is No Longer "King"… It's a Criminal Suspect

    Cash was king. These days, it is more of a headache than it is royalty.

    When it comes to larger purchases, the advantages once conferred by carrying a wad of green stuff in your wallet are all but gone. Justice Department officials in the U.S. (and officials elsewhere) are ratcheting up their decades-long war on cash. To hear them tell it, cash is mostly useful for terrorists and low-down criminals. Your use of any significant amount of cash can now make you guilty in the eyes of the law until you prove the transaction was legitimate.

    Maybe you can persuade your bank teller. Attempt to withdraw or deposit a few thousand dollars in cash, and you’ll likely get the chance. Expect questioning about the purpose of the cash. If you answer with “it isn’t any of your business” or something equally unsatisfactory, then you will be inviting her to file a Suspicious Activity Report. Banks and a select group of other businesses filed more than 1.6 million of them in 2013.

    Or, the teller might decide to call the authorities right away. The head of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division, Leslie Caldwell, would certainly like to see banks drop a dime on customers more often. While speaking at the ACAMS Anti-Money Laundering and Financial Crime Conference on March 16th, she said:

    “The vast majority of financial institutions file Suspicious Activity Reports when they suspect that an account is connected to nefarious activity. But, in appropriate cases, we encourage those institutions to consider whether to take more action: specifically, to alert law enforcement authorities about the problem, who may be able to seize the funds, initiate an investigation, or take other proactive steps.“

    Caldwell’s statement hints at what is really an escalation of a decades-old policy of enlisting banks to rat out customers.

    It started with the Bank Secrecy Act in 1970. The law required banks to report transactions of more than $10,000. If you have been into a bank trying to withdraw a few thousand in cash, you may have sensed banks aren’t encouraging that kind of activity. You likely encountered days of delay while the bank ordered cash and got funny looks and probing questions from tellers.

    While the treatment you get from your bank may be awkward, there may be worse coming from the police. Authorities who find significant quantities of cash in your possession may assume the worst about you and seize your cash. Civil asset forfeiture is on the rise and no one with a badge has to convict you of a crime to take your belongings. Victims tend to be assumed guilty until proven innocent.

    There was a time when offering cash put you in a strong bargaining position. Sellers appreciated having good funds and avoiding the fees associated with taking a payment by credit card.

    Today, buyers and sellers using cash face increasing hassles, scrutiny, and risks. Add that to the perpetual inflation assaulting the purchasing power of whatever cash you hold -- and cash is anything but king.
  • nibannynibanny Posts: 2,862


    << <i>Why would you want to store cash in a SDB?
    In the movies during the getaway they go get their passport and cash from the SDB.

    You can get your cash from your account during the same hours the bank is open.
    If there is a disaster, you won't be able to get cash from the bank or have access to your safe deposit box.

    Unless your cash comes from underground financial transactions I don't see any reason to store it in a SDB. >>



    I agree with you, with the exception of foreign currency.
    The member formerly known as Ciccio / Posts: 1453 / Joined: Apr 2009
  • CaptHenwayCaptHenway Posts: 22,925 ✭✭✭✭
    Apparently this is just an action by Chase at this time, part of a general revision of their SDB lease agreement.

    Don't like the PIN replacing the signature, however.
    Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.--Ben Franklin


  • << <i>They won't allow bullion or cash? Wasn't that the reason for safe deposit boxes in the first place? You have to ask yourself, "what's the agenda this time around?" >>



    They don't want anything stashed that they don't know about or can't go after. One more step towards their ultimate goal.. I guess they will have to go to a cashless system like they are already planning.
  • johnny9434johnny9434 Posts: 17,137 ✭✭✭
    so much for them keeping things safe there. i wont be a customer there then.
  • cohodkcohodk Posts: 14,019 ✭✭✭


    << <i>there are no state or federal regulations concerning what can be stored in a safe deposit box. It is a contractual matter between the box renter and the institution that is renting out the box. Store what you wish, until something changes you are the only one that sees what goes in or out of the box. >>




    +1
    Its time....12/16/15
  • CoulportCoulport Posts: 1,223 ✭✭✭
    One major bank and a credit union where I have a box just require ID and a signature.
    The other major bank has a hand print scanner and the box number to be entered. That opens the inner glass vault door. You access your box with your key. The other slot for the banks key is plugged. This eliminates the need for a bank person to assist you. Asking at this bank about anything not allowed in the box, was told it's your box you can put in what you want.
    The most money I made are on coins I haven't sold.

    Got quoins?
  • I worked for a bank back in the 1990's. This really isn't new, except for doing away with the keys. That's more of a technology change. But they always had a rule: no cash in the safety deposit box. They want you to keep currency in your account. Clearly they are not making money off your deposit if it sits in the safety deposit box.
    I can't be out of money. I still have checks!
  • PerryHallPerryHall Posts: 34,469 ✭✭✭✭
    Is the "no cash in your SDB" rule actually enforceable? I don't see how it could be so you can be sure that it will be ignored by anyone who wants to keep cash in their SDB for whatever reason.
  • bluelobsterbluelobster Posts: 1,123 ✭✭✭
    As Afab said I don't think this is new, just more focus on cash AML guidelines. I don't think they are going to be able to claim most bullion is not collectible.
  • coindeucecoindeuce Posts: 13,218 ✭✭✭✭


    << <i>Since there's no practical way to enforce the rule, there's no reason to expect actual compliance, so something else must be going on.

    I believe banks are obligated to report cash being held in a SDB, if they are aware of it. And Chase's demand that customers not stash their cash sounds mostly like a warning to their customers not to let any bank employees see the contents. >>



    Under the provisions of The Patriot Act, any financial institution providing service to an individual who is found in violation of clauses of the Patriot Act, is deemed EQUALLY CULPABLE to those violations. Even simple transactions, such as cash deposits of relatively minor amounts (i.e. $1,000) are reported by commercial banks AND credit unions to the IRS (which now falls under the Federal umbrella of the DHS), lest they be accused of aiding an individual in any form of money laundering.
    In effect, financial institutions have been conscripted as agents of the government - like it or not it is the new world order.
    Wilkum to Amerika, comrades. image

    OTOH, one can store any dang thing they want in their SDB, but if it violates the terms and provisions of the contract with the financial institution and that is discovered, one can fully expect civil action from the institution, above and beyond whatever Big Brother decides to heap on in criminal charges. Land of the free and home of the brave !

    "Everything is on its way to somewhere. Everything." - George Malley, Phenomenon
    http://www.americanlegacycoins.com

  • lcoopielcoopie Posts: 8,131 ✭✭✭
    I seem to recall that you are not supposed to store cash as well as firearms in the box.
  • TwoSides2aCoinTwoSides2aCoin Posts: 37,686 ✭✭✭✭
    dated a gal one time who'd been married 4 times. She took me to her SDB and asked me to help her count her money. She had $55K in cash. I said, "You're dumb, this should be working for you " . I dumped her a few months later . Found out 3 years later she'd gotten married and divorced 5 more times. No telling how much she has stashed now. image


    Back to your regularly scheduled reading.
  • BAJJERFANBAJJERFAN Posts: 27,816 ✭✭✭


    << <i>

    << <i>Since there's no practical way to enforce the rule, there's no reason to expect actual compliance, so something else must be going on.

    I believe banks are obligated to report cash being held in a SDB, if they are aware of it. And Chase's demand that customers not stash their cash sounds mostly like a warning to their customers not to let any bank employees see the contents. >>



    Under the provisions of The Patriot Act, any financial institution providing service to an individual who is found in violation of clauses of the Patriot Act, is deemed EQUALLY CULPABLE to those violations. Even simple transactions, such as cash deposits of relatively minor amounts (i.e. $1,000) are reported by commercial banks AND credit unions to the IRS (which now falls under the Federal umbrella of the DHS), lest they be accused of aiding an individual in any form of money laundering.
    In effect, financial institutions have been conscripted as agents of the government - like it or not it is the new world order.
    Wilkum to Amerika, comrades. image

    OTOH, one can store any dang thing they want in their SDB, but if it violates the terms and provisions of the contract with the financial institution and that is discovered, one can fully expect civil action from the institution, above and beyond whatever Big Brother decides to heap on in criminal charges. Land of the free and home of the brave ! >>



    I thought cash deposits of $5K or less are only recorded, but not reported.
  • BAJJERFANBAJJERFAN Posts: 27,816 ✭✭✭
    I expect that if one wanted that "cash" working for them, it wouldn't be in a SDB. If one went to a coin show and sold their collection for cash [say $50K worth] how many here would deposit that into their account/s? I expect that the banks don't want to expose themselves to the appearance of being complicit in criminal activity, hence the rule.

    A drawback to storing cash in a SDB is the possibility of access being frozen by court order.
  • BaleyBaley Posts: 19,526 ✭✭✭✭
    the bank regulations are typically about plausible deniability. In the event that the customer has engaged other criminal behavior Using the box then the bank says" we told you not to". . Until and unless you're caught, as has been said who's gonna know?

    Liberty: Parent of Science & Industry

  • 19Lyds19Lyds Posts: 26,389 ✭✭✭


    << <i>AHA!

    image\

    >>

    Why on earth are you storing "hot dogs" in your SDB?? image
    I decided to change calling the bathroom the John and renamed it the Jim. I feel so much better saying I went to the Jim this morning.



    The name is LEE!
  • guitarwesguitarwes Posts: 9,193 ✭✭✭
    In case he gets locked in the vault and gets hungry. Duh.
    LINK TO EBAY STORE
    Too many BST transactions with too many members to list.
  • BAJJERFANBAJJERFAN Posts: 27,816 ✭✭✭
    It's possible that the bank had a waiting list for SDBs and was simply trying to free some up by enticing current customers to give theirs up.
  • Many ways to think about this. The Reserve destroys millions of dollars a day. How do they know which bills they are destroying. Bills are numbered for a reason. When someone orders money from the bank the bills are logged into a system and sent out into the economy. These bills eventually return to the bank and sent to the Reserve to be destroyed, again these numbers are scanned and then destroyed. They know exactly how many bills and what denominations are missing in the economy. They just don't know where they are. New Bills can not be printed unless they have one to destroy....So there must be some really old bills out there unaccounted for and I am pretty sure most will not be in SDB's. Foreign banks, bills should be accounted for. I would have to say it is Laundering which they are searching for, if some Laundered money were to return into the economy it could be traced through individual banks.
  • BAJJERFANBAJJERFAN Posts: 27,816 ✭✭✭


    << <i>Many ways to think about this. The Reserve destroys millions of dollars a day. How do they know which bills they are destroying. Bills are numbered for a reason. When someone orders money from the bank the bills are logged into a system and sent out into the economy. These bills eventually return to the bank and sent to the Reserve to be destroyed, again these numbers are scanned and then destroyed. They know exactly how many bills and what denominations are missing in the economy. They just don't know where they are. New Bills can not be printed unless they have one to destroy....So there must be some really old bills out there unaccounted for and I am pretty sure most will not be in SDB's. Foreign banks, bills should be accounted for. I would have to say it is Laundering which they are searching for, if some Laundered money were to return into the economy it could be traced through individual banks. >>



    How about the billions in cash that leave the country? Most of those aren't coming back.
  • OPAOPA Posts: 14,393 ✭✭✭


    << <i>

    << <i>Many ways to think about this. The Reserve destroys millions of dollars a day. How do they know which bills they are destroying. Bills are numbered for a reason. When someone orders money from the bank the bills are logged into a system and sent out into the economy. These bills eventually return to the bank and sent to the Reserve to be destroyed, again these numbers are scanned and then destroyed. They know exactly how many bills and what denominations are missing in the economy. They just don't know where they are. New Bills can not be printed unless they have one to destroy....So there must be some really old bills out there unaccounted for and I am pretty sure most will not be in SDB's. Foreign banks, bills should be accounted for. I would have to say it is Laundering which they are searching for, if some Laundered money were to return into the economy it could be traced through individual banks. >>



    How about the billions in cash that leave the country? Most of those aren't coming back. >>



    What makes you think that the dollar remains hidden overseas? They do come back ... exchanged for than country's currency in hand with the Fed.
    "Bongo drive 1984 Lincoln that looks like old coin dug from ground."
  • BAJJERFANBAJJERFAN Posts: 27,816 ✭✭✭
    There was a story on Yahoo awhile back about how $40 billion in cash [$100 bills] was flown to Baghdad for rebuilding after the war. A goodly part of it was never accounted for. It was quite the task to move it from the airport to the Bank of Baghdad which was downtown. How about all of the cash that the drug lords have?
  • bronco2078bronco2078 Posts: 3,723 ✭✭✭


    << <i>There was a story on Yahoo awhile back about how $40 billion in cash [$100 bills] was flown to Baghdad for rebuilding after the war. A goodly part of it was never accounted for. It was quite the task to move it from the airport to the Bank of Baghdad which was downtown. How about all of the cash that the drug lords have? >>




    The drug lord money is accounted for , the banks are laundering all of that quite openly.
  • Drug money from what I have seen discovered on the News, has been buried underground in tunnels on skids. They sure will not be returned until found. $$$ taken from here by travelers probably will be kept foreign for exchanges of other currencies....To me it seems kind of fruitless, but maybe you never know maybe they will find some leads. I can see how a new money system could be of benefit to National Security and our money supply as a whole.


  • << <i>Drug money from what I have seen discovered on the News, has been buried underground in tunnels on skids. They sure will not be returned until found. $$$ taken from here by travelers probably will be kept foreign for exchanges of other currencies....To me it seems kind of fruitless, but maybe you never know maybe they will find some leads. I can see how a new money system could be of benefit to National Security and our money supply as a whole. >>



    Cashless. Coming to a theater near you.. image
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