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  • SSRSSR Posts: 224 ✭✭✭✭

    @Zoins said:
    Just found out that @DLHansen is the owner of the top condition Strawberry Leaf Cent!

    Did Eliasberg have a Strawberry Leaf cent? The 4 specimens covering 2 varieties on CoinFacts don't list Eliasberg in any of the provenances.

    1793 Strawberry Leaf Wreath Cent, VG10 BN
    PCGS POP 2/1/0
    Certification #12952855, PCGS #35483
    PCGS Price Guide Value $775,000 / Realized $660,000
    Ex. Lorin Gilbert Parmelee, Virgil Michael Brand

    Wow. Thats a great addition.

    www.paradimecoins.com - Specializing in Top Pop Type PCGS CAC coins.
    Follow for daily NEWPS facebook.com/paradimecoins
  • ZoinsZoins Posts: 29,305 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited September 5, 2021 5:54PM

    @MFeld said:

    @SSR said:

    @Zoins said:
    Just found out that @DLHansen is the owner of the top condition Strawberry Leaf Cent!

    Did Eliasberg have a Strawberry Leaf cent? The 4 specimens covering 2 varieties on CoinFacts don't list Eliasberg in any of the provenances.

    1793 Strawberry Leaf Wreath Cent, VG10 BN
    PCGS POP 2/1/0
    Certification #12952855, PCGS #35483
    PCGS Price Guide Value $775,000 / Realized $660,000
    Ex. Lorin Gilbert Parmelee, Virgil Michael Brand

    Wow. Thats a great addition.

    Has anyone ever mentioned that the grading label reads “Parmelle” instead of “Parmelee”?

    I noticed that, but I'm not sure if it's the first time it's been mentioned!

  • ZoinsZoins Posts: 29,305 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited September 5, 2021 6:04PM

    @MFeld said:

    @Zoins said:

    @MFeld said:

    @SSR said:

    @Zoins said:
    Just found out that @DLHansen is the owner of the top condition Strawberry Leaf Cent!

    Did Eliasberg have a Strawberry Leaf cent? The 4 specimens covering 2 varieties on CoinFacts don't list Eliasberg in any of the provenances.

    1793 Strawberry Leaf Wreath Cent, VG10 BN
    PCGS POP 2/1/0
    Certification #12952855, PCGS #35483
    PCGS Price Guide Value $775,000 / Realized $660,000
    Ex. Lorin Gilbert Parmelee, Virgil Michael Brand

    Wow. Thats a great addition.

    Has anyone ever mentioned that the grading label reads “Parmelle” instead of “Parmelee”?

    I noticed that, but I'm not sure if it's the first time it's been mentioned :)

    Since you’re not sure, I’d appreciate it if you’d spend a few minutes (or years) reading through all of the threads here, in order to confirm.😉

    I'll put it on the list but I'm too busy adding various incarnations of the Strawberry Leaf cent to multiple threads! What a great coin with a rich history! :)

  • CatbertCatbert Posts: 4,489 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited September 6, 2021 3:55AM

    Wonder which wreath picture is more in line with an in hand view? :(

    "Got a flaming heart, can't get my fill"
  • ZoinsZoins Posts: 29,305 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited September 5, 2021 6:28PM

    @Zoins said:

    @MFeld said:

    @Zoins said:

    @MFeld said:

    @SSR said:

    @Zoins said:
    Just found out that @DLHansen is the owner of the top condition Strawberry Leaf Cent!

    Did Eliasberg have a Strawberry Leaf cent? The 4 specimens covering 2 varieties on CoinFacts don't list Eliasberg in any of the provenances.

    1793 Strawberry Leaf Wreath Cent, VG10 BN
    PCGS POP 2/1/0
    Certification #12952855, PCGS #35483
    PCGS Price Guide Value $775,000 / Realized $660,000
    Ex. Lorin Gilbert Parmelee, Virgil Michael Brand

    Wow. Thats a great addition.

    Has anyone ever mentioned that the grading label reads “Parmelle” instead of “Parmelee”?

    I noticed that, but I'm not sure if it's the first time it's been mentioned :)

    Since you’re not sure, I’d appreciate it if you’d spend a few minutes (or years) reading through all of the threads here, in order to confirm.😉

    I'll put it on the list but I'm too busy adding various incarnations of the Strawberry Leaf cent to multiple threads! What a great coin with a rich history! :)

    BTW, I'm hoping Parmelee's name will be spelled correctly when it gets reslabbed with @DLHansen's insert.

    cc: @JBatDavidLawrence

  • jonathanbjonathanb Posts: 2,964 ✭✭✭✭

    @MFeld said:

    @Zoins said:

    @MFeld said:
    Has anyone ever mentioned that the grading label reads “Parmelle” instead of “Parmelee”?

    I noticed that, but I'm not sure if it's the first time it's been mentioned :)

    Since you’re not sure, I’d appreciate it if you’d spend a few minutes (or years) reading through all of the threads here, in order to confirm.😉

    Both spellings were mentioned in the same post earlier in this thread (August 8, 2020).

    Both spellings are also seen in the PCGS press release from August 10, 2020.

    Neither of those sources pointed out the typos, even though they repeated it.

  • tcollectstcollects Posts: 228 ✭✭✭

    we need a video of Hansen cracking that Parmelle slab with bolt cutters

  • CurrinCurrin Posts: 1,351 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Major Varieties – Countdown 17

    Howard Sharfman’s Incredible Chicago Collection of Half Dollars, Part 6

    It’s not enough for you to build the basic set? You want more of a challenge? Good! You now get to collect both major varieties of the 1796, the rare 1795 3 Leaf, the RARE 1806 Knob 6 No Stem, the ultra-ultra-rare 1817/4 and dozens of other fun and interesting varieties. When you finish this set you might want to try every Overton variety in existence! Collectors love this series with a passion and we fully expect you to join the crowd.- PCGS Registry

    In this final update for the Howard Sharfman’s Incredible Chicago Collection of Half Dollars, we will look at one of the coins that went into the Major Varieties Collection. As you know, the D.L. Hansen Collection purchased 25 half dollars in the September 2, 2021, Legend Rare Coin Auctions’ (LRCA) Regency Auction 47 held at the Bellagio Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada. I have previously introduced you to 14 of the coins purchased, these are the last 11.

    1809 “Overton 102 XXX Edge”, MS63, CAC, Cert #39522015, POP 2/1, realized $44,650
    181.7 “Punctuated Date”, MS64+, Cert #84006440, POP 1/0, realized $35,250
    1812/1 “Large 8”, XF45, Cert #32443380, POP 6/5, realized $31,725
    1814 “O-105a Single Leaf”, AU50, Cert #34743428, POP 3/7, realized $5,522.50
    1820 “Sq. 2, Lg Date, Knob 2”, MS64, Cert #80624313, POP 4/2, realized $18,800
    1827/6, MS64+, Cert #83573441, POP 2/1, realized $11,162.50
    1830 “O-114 Large Letters Small 0”, AU55, Cert #27646360, POP 2/3, realized $34,075
    1832 “Large Letters”, MS64, CAC, Cert #37644742, POP 8/1, realized $8,518.75
    1836 “50/00, Lettered Edge”, CAC, MS63, Cert #41879081, POP 4/2, realized $6,756.25
    1836/1336 “O-108 Lettered Edge”, MS64, Cert # 36529240, POP 1/0, realized $9,106.25
    1839 “Capped Bust, Small Letters”, VF25, Cert #81456119, POP 1/3, realized $85,187.50

    These eleven coins realized a total for Capped Bust Halves Major Varieties of $290,753.75. As previous reported, the seven Capped Bust Halves Basic coins realized $309,562.50. The total realized for the seven pre-Capped Bust Half Dollars that went into The Hansen sets was $837,814.50. The 25 coins realized $1,438,170.75. The priciest coin from the major variety lot is most circulated (worn). The 1839 “Capped Bust, Small Letters”, VF25, realized $85,187.50.

    This may the most significant coin purchased in the sale. With this coin, Mr. Hansen completes Early Half Dollars with Major Varieties, Circulation Strikes (1794-1839) Set. It will be recorded in history that it took about five years to complete this 101-piece set. It places the Hansen Collection of Early Half Dollars as #2 on the All-Time list. This will be the final focus coin for the sale.

    1839 “Capped Bust, Small Letters”, VF25, Ex: Southland Collection

    This very worn VF25 coin realized $85,187.50, the 11th highest in the sale of 120 half dollars. Described by Legends Auction as: One of the RAREST coins in this world class cabinet, the 1839 Reeded Edge with Small Letters reverse is a rarity in the truest sense of the word. The GR-1, which is a Low Rarity-7, is a "transitional" variety, which paired the Capped Bust obverse die with a reverse that was intended for the new Seated Liberty type introduced later in 1839, sometimes referred to as the "reverse of 1840." There are now 12 examples accounted for; as of Dick Graham's publication of the Reeded Edge half dollar die marriages in 2015, there were 11 examples reported. In November 2019, another, graded XF40 by PCGS and approved by CAC turned up in the E. Horatio Morgan Collection, sold by Stack's Bowers. While not specifically listed in their listing, this VF25 would land about the mid-point grade wise in their listing, between places 6 a PCGS VF35 and 7 a PCGS VF20.

    Expert Gordon Wrubel writes: “In 1838 The lower reverse legend on Reeded Edge Capped Bust half dollars was changed from "50 Cents" to "Half Dol." It is believed this change was made to conform to the designations on other denominations being produced at the time. This "Type II" reverse would appear on all coinage through the end of Liberty Seated series in 1891. 1839 marked the last appearance of the Bust obverse which was replaced later in the year by the Liberty Seated die. One of the Capped Bust 1839 varieties has a unique, pattern(?) reverse die known as "Small" Letters. This extremely rare variety was first recognized by New York numismatist, Maurice Rosen, in 1972. With its unique reverse, this coin designated GR-1,(Graham-Reiver) is highly coveted by die variety and Red Book collectors alike. To die variety collectors, GR-1 is the "Holy Grail" of the Reeded Edge half dollar series, rivaling the the "proof" 1838-O in rarity. The 2012 Graham-Reiver book traces only 10 specimens, with one in Mint State. This piece was graded MS-63 by PCGS in 1997. The obverse die of GR-1 was used on the first four varieties of 1839. The reverse show some distinctive differences. The size of the eagle is smaller than on any to follow. The eagles talons are more closed. The "Small" letters are tall, thinner and spaced AWAY from the rim due to having more room because of the SMALLER size eagle. The "Large" letters are from different style punches; squat, thick and very CLOSE to the rim because of the lack of space due to the LARGER eagle. Be that as it may, there is a telltale feature of the die that is DIAGNOSTIC. One only has to look at the BOTTOM ARROW FEATHER that shows below the STEM of the olive branch. On the 'Small" Letters only the VERY TIP shows below the stem. On all other 1839 Capped coins, the reverses show about ONE THIRD of the bottom feather below the stem as well as a significant portion of the ARROW SHAFT.

    Mr. Hansen paid a 70% premium over the Legend estimate of $45,000 - $55,000. The PCGS Price Guide Value for the coin was $45,000. Legend states: The current PCGS Price Guide value is listed at $45,000. The most recent auction appearance was the PCGS/CAC XF40 mentioned above that sold for $90,000 in November 2019. Even in Good-4, the Merrill Collection coin sold for $17,400 in February 2018. Ownership of an 1839 Small Letters Capped Bust half dollar automatically puts you into rarified company, very few, even the most serious of collectors have been able to add one to their collections. Good luck!

    According to Legend’s description: Moderate wear is evenly dispersed across both sides of this classic rarity. The obverse is sharply impressed, and the details are generally bold. Some scattered marks at the rims are appropriate for the assigned grade. There is some "dirt" clinging to the obverse rim and surrounding the eagle and in the reverse legend. An important rarity missing from most collections.

    Provenance: Southland Collection, (Heritage, 5/2007), lot 2131; unknown intermediaries; Matt Kleinstuber, via private treaty (4/2019), realized $50,000, Howard Sharfman; Howard Sharfman’s Chicago Collection; The Regency Auction 47 (Legends 9/2021), lot 118, realized $85,187.50, D.L. Hansen Collection.

    1839 “Capped Bust, Small Letters”, VF25
    PCGS Overall POP 1/3
    Certification #81456119, PCGS #6180
    PCGS Price Guide $45,000 / Realized $85,187.50
    Ex: Southland Collection (Chicago PCGS Registry Set)

    The Major Varieties Set is an expansion of the PCGS Basic Set. To complete, this set would require the 2821 basic coins plus an additional 439 Major Varieties Coins. With this addition, there are 17 remaining coins in this quest. The first two coins are not collectable, so the completion of this set would be 99.94%. PCGS describes this set as: Every classic U.S. coin in Circulation Strike from 1792 through 1964, every date, every Mintmark, every major variety, this set is the ultimate challenge. A collection of this size could take decades to assemble in high grade.

    Top 10
    1797 Half Eagle "Large Eagle, 15 Stars" (1 Known – Permanently in Smithsonian) Uncollectable
    1797 Half Eagle "Large Eagle, 16 Stars" (1 Known – Permanently in Smithsonian) Uncollectable
    1861 Double Eagle "Paquet" (2 Known)
    1804 Eagle "Plain 4 Proof" (3 Known)
    1849-C Gold Dollar "Open Wreath" (4 Known w/ one defective)
    1958 Small Cent "Doubled Die Obverse” (3 Known)
    1795 Large Cent "Jefferson, Lettered Edge" (5 Known w/ VF Finest Known)
    1810 Half Eagle "Large Date, Small 5" (5 Known w/ AU Finest Known)
    1842 Half Dollar "Small Date, Rev of 1839" (Survival est. 10 w/ 1 Mint State)
    1804 Quarter Eagle "13 Star Reverse" (Survival est. 11 w/ AU Finest Known)

    Last 7
    1797 Half Cent "Gripped Edge" (Survival est. 13 w/ VG Finest Known)
    1797 Half Eagle "Small Eagle, 15 Stars" (Survival est. 20 w/ 1 Mint State)
    1820 Half Eagle "Curl Base 2, Sm Letters" (Survival est. 14 w/ 8 Mint State)
    1798/7 Eagle "7X6 Stars" (Survival est. 25 w/ 3 Mint State)
    1798 Quarter Eagle "Wide Date" (Survival est. 50 w/ 8 Mint State)
    1798 Dollar "Large Eagle, Knob 9, 4 Lines" (Survival est. 125 w/ 2 Mint State)
    1887/6 Three Cent CN (Survival est. 800 w/ 750 Mint State)

    My 20th Century Type Set, With Type Variations---started : 9/22/1997 ---- completed : 1/7/2004

    My 20th Century Gold Major Design Type Set ---started : 11/17/1997 ---- completed : 1/21/2004
  • PerfectionPerfection Posts: 180 ✭✭✭

    I have the other CAC one. but it's NGC, Great coins.
    The 67 Non Cac's are of course not worth more. Sure someone might pay more to say they own a 67 but it is really at most a 66 CAC in disguise if they are lucky. -:)

  • OldIndianNutKaseOldIndianNutKase Posts: 2,453 ✭✭✭✭✭

    WOW!!!! But at only $394.999.88 I think it was a steal. Perhaps not a Top POP, but very hard to find any flaws that reveal themselves in that TV picture. Let us see if DLH would buy one of the 67's without CAC if presented that opportunity.

    Or maybe he will just send it in for a regrade?

    OINK

  • GazesGazes Posts: 2,161 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Did he pay too much? Put it this way if or when the coin sells again I would be shocked if it did not go for considerably more. Great addition.

  • yosclimberyosclimber Posts: 3,583 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited October 7, 2021 5:55PM

    Nice work as always!

    Here is the updated 1837-1857 half dime proof collection comparison.

    The 1846 V-2 proof half dime is proof only for this obverse die,
    so I doubt there is a problem with crossing as proof from NGC to PCGS.


    Making a roster is difficult because of the lack of good photos for the older auctions.
    Here is the roster I made for the 1846 attribution guide prior to the appearance of the Hansen coin in the recent auction.
    I might be able to do a little better by using the roster in the Kaufman sale description.

    One interesting thing about the 1846 V-2 proof is that it is more available than MS examples of the V-1.
    (1846 only has 2 die varieties - V-1 business strike only and V-2 proof only).
    There are only 3 known MS V-1s, and 2 were in the Gardner collection.
    For example, the Simpson collection had an AU-53.
    There are around 10 known AUs.

  • CurrinCurrin Posts: 1,351 ✭✭✭✭✭

    YOS,
    Super Update. One inconsistency, Coin Facts have Kaufman owning a 1840 PF65 WD. From your research, do you think CF has it incorrect? I am wondering if Kaufman had 20 coins as Pittman. This is a screenshot.

    My 20th Century Type Set, With Type Variations---started : 9/22/1997 ---- completed : 1/7/2004

    My 20th Century Gold Major Design Type Set ---started : 11/17/1997 ---- completed : 1/21/2004
  • yosclimberyosclimber Posts: 3,583 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited October 7, 2021 10:02PM

    Yes, the above PCGS CoinFacts census for 1840 WD is incorrect.
    You can see it copies coins which are correctly in the 1840 ND census.
    The only 1840 proof half dime in the Kaufman sale was lot 1779 and it is ND (Hansen has it now).
    Similarly, the Pittman lot 460 was eventually bought by Gardner, and that is also ND.
    So if your census was based on the above, Pittman did not have an 1840 WD proof,
    and I have corrected the chart.


    Only one 1840 WD (V-7) proof exists in relatively recent auctions that I know of.
    Gem PR, 1998-5-5, Stack's, lot 365, $7700, Hawn/Miller/Globus
    as shown in PCGS Auction Prices:
    https://www.pcgs.com/auctionprices/details/1840-drapery-pr/4416
    I don't know where this coin has been since 1998.
    Given that it's a pre-1858 proof, where quality varies, there is also the risk that
    this single example is no longer considered a proof by most graders.

    Including it in the proof half dime registry set could make completion extremely difficult.
    I think I see what happened, though.
    Based on the census that showed 4 "With Drapery" examples, the person who constructed
    the registry set list thought it looked as collectible as the others.
    Usually the "ultra rarities" like the 1870-s half dime get left out of registry sets,
    because many collectors don't want to start a set that they can't complete.

  • CurrinCurrin Posts: 1,351 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Liberty Head Half Eagle Upgrade

    With respect to both mintage and frequency of appearance, the 1867 is of almost identical rarity to the 1866. The known business strikes of this date are almost always well worn and VF or EF specimens are typical. I have seen a couple of AU pieces but never one with any legitimate claim to mint state although the photo of the 1963 Bell coin indicates that it may have been uncirculated as it is graded - David Akers (1975/88)

    In the past few weeks, D.L. Hansen and Team have acquired a few nice Mint State Half Eagles. The 201-piece set including the 1854-S has been the subject of discussion many times. PCGS describes the set as: There is no other set of coins that features specimens from seven U. S. Mints—Philadelphia, Charlotte, Dahlonega, Carson City, Denver, New Orleans and San Francisco. This long-lived set includes one of the greatest rarities in numismatics, the 1854-S $5 gold piece. How many has PCGS graded? Zero! There are many sets-within-sets in this series, as most collectors focus on the coins from one particular Mint. It’s a long and challenging collection to complete, but it’s a tremendous achievement if you can do it.

    The D.L Hansen Collection completed the set in March of 2020 with the purchase of the 1854-S. The set rating at the time was 59.751. The collection could have stopped there, but not the case. Since the completion of the set about a year and half ago, there have been about 30 coins upgraded bring the current set rating to 61.100. The top five sets of all-times are:

    From time to time, I will take an unofficial stab at trying to estimate the value of a set using PCGS published values. The value that I would place on this set using that method is a little over eight million dollars. The lowest grade coin the set is the 1866-S Motto, F12 valued at $1400. Of course, the most valuable coin the set is the 1854-S AU58+ valued more than $2 Million. The highest-graded coin is the 1908 MS68, CAC. There are about 32 PCGS POP 1/0 certified specimens. This new upgrade is one of those finest certified at PCGS.

    1867 Liberty Head Half Eagle MS64

    Most certainly the statement made by David Akers is a little outdated. The mint state rarity still applies more than 30 years later. NGC has certified just three: two MS61 and the finest NGC MS62. PCGS has certified seven: one MS60, four MS61 and one MS62. Only one coin has been graded mint state choice or better, the Hansen MS64. Coin Facts estimate MS60 or better survival at only three. Can we safely assume a few of the coins in the POP reports are resubmits? According to Doug Winter, Yes!

    In a CoinWeek article dated April 26, 2021, Mr. Winter submitted a piece titled: Half Eagles of the Reconstruction: Philadelphia. He stated: The $5 gold half eagles struck at the Philadelphia Mint from 1866 through 1877 include a number of low-mintage issues that, while undeniably rare, are curiously underappreciated. I regard some of the issues as among the best values in all of the rare date gold market. As for the 1867 issue, he said: The 1867 is a scarcer coin than the 1866 despite having a slightly higher mintage of 6,870. I estimate that there are around 80 to 90 known, with EF45 to AU53 being the grade range in which this issue is most often seen. Properly graded AU55 to AU58s are very rare and this date is extremely rare in Uncirculated with just two or three known to me. The single-finest business strike 1867 half eagle I am aware of is a PCGS MS61 (also graded MS62 by NGC), which I sold to a collector for $30,000 a few years back. PCGS has graded a single coin MS62 but I haven’t seen it.

    Less than six months ago, this gold expert was not aware of a choice issue for this date. Then where did this coin come from? I would expect the coin to be one of the three of four MS62 that is now in a MS64 holder. Amazingly, the auction record is $16,450 for a MS61 PCGS coin sold in the September 2014 Long Beach Expo U.S. Coins Signature Auction.

    PCGS values the Hansen PCGS MS64 specimen at $100,000. I cannot find any information or history on this coin. I would think it was acquired via David Lawrence Rare Coins, but no information is available to confirm. The PCGS POP 1/0 specimen replaces a AU58+ PCGS POP 1/7 specimen. This is a nice upgrade for a coin that did not exist in the certification world until a few months ago.

    1867 Liberty Half Eagle MS64
    PCGS POP 1/0
    Certification #41789761, PCGS #8313
    PCGS Price Guide Value: $100,000 / Private Transaction

    My 20th Century Type Set, With Type Variations---started : 9/22/1997 ---- completed : 1/7/2004

    My 20th Century Gold Major Design Type Set ---started : 11/17/1997 ---- completed : 1/21/2004
  • CurrinCurrin Posts: 1,351 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Another Liberty Head Half Eagle Upgrade

    From a standpoint of rarity according to average grade, the 1870-CC ranks number one in the entire 300 coin Half Eagle series. I have seen fewer of this date than any other Carson City Half Eagle although the 1878-CC has had five fewer auction appearances in my survey. The 1870-CC is very rare in any condition and when available, the typical example is only Fine or VF. I have seen several EF's and one I graded full AU but none that could reasonably be called uncirculated. Strike characteristics of this issue are difficult to be certain of because most specimens are so worn. However, I would say that, when they were made, most 1870-CC Half Eagles were probably well struck. - David Akers (1975/88)

    I reported a few weeks ago that D.L. Hansen and Team purchased a nice small acquisition of Dahlonega Mint Half Eagles from Doug Winter. The four half eagle coins were purchased in a private acquisition via David Lawrence Rare Coins. I am not certain of the details of the acquisition, but the purchase certainly provided amazing upgrades the collection.

    Since the Dahlonega Mint Half Eagles purchase, two or three more half eagles have been added including the PCGS POP 1/0 1867 MS64 that I reported a couple days ago. Today, the upgrade goes into the 1870-CC subset. This subset is only six coins, but I can not think any subset that has more numismatic nostalgic. PCGS stated: The Carson City mint holds a special place in the hearts and minds of U.S. numismatists, conjuring up (largely accurate) images of a small "wild west" town where gold and silver were king. In operation from 1870…. The opening year of 1870 is clearly the key to this fairly short set with few pieces extant, nearly all of which are well-circulated.

    With three silver coins, and three gold, it appears fairly easy to assembly. The statement may be true, but it is very difficult in high grade PCGS certified specimens. With this updated, the Collection replaces another well-circulated coin. The new upgrade is an 1870-CC Half Eagle AU58 with a Pop of 4/1. The coin replaces a recent purchased VF25, Cert #21625523 that was purchased earlier this year from Heritage Auctions. The previous coin is a F12, CAC Approved, Cert #84687877 purchased earlier in the Collection, maybe 2017 timeframe. The current PCGS value on the #3 coin is $22,500. It could make a very nice future coin for someone.

    1870-CC Liberty Head Half Eagle AU58, Ex: Midwestern Collection

    In the Heritage Auction’s 1/2003, (FUN) Signature Sale, the coin was headlined as Very Rare 1870-CC Half Eagle--AU58--The #5 Coin On The Condition Census. It was described as: Winter 1-A. Die State II. An original coin that shows the usual softness of strike known on this die state; that is, weakness on Liberty's hair as well as blurry, indistinct feather definition on the eagle's head and neck. Nice light yellow-gold and rose colors rest on lightly marked surfaces. Unlike some higher grade 1870-CC Half Eagles, this piece has not been cleaned or over-dipped and it shows superb overall eye appeal. An important Condition Census example of this rare and desirable first year of issue Carson City Five Dollar. Of the 7,675 pieces originally struck, an estimated 50 to 60 are known today. This includes around seven to nine in About Uncirculated and another four in Uncirculated. This is the only 1870-CC gold issue that is sometimes seen in relatively high grades and it appears that a small number may have been saved as souvenirs.

    The Condition Census for the 1870-CC Half Eagle is as follows (HA 1/2003):
    1. Nevada Collection. Graded Mint State 61 by PCGS.
    2. Private collection, Ex: Bowers and Merena 7/02: 607 ($77,625, as NGC MS61). Presently graded MS62 by NGC.
    3. Jay Parrino, Ex: Bowers and Merena 10/99: 1170 ($69,000, as PCGS AU58); Harry Bass; NERCA 1979 ANA: 182. PCGS MS61.
    4. Private collection, Ex: Charley Tuppen collection; Heritage 12/88: 1142. Graded MS61 by NGC.
    5. The Hansen Specimen, Ex: Midwestern Collection. Graded AU58 by PCGS.

    Currently, only one of the top coins is graded uncirculated by PGGS, the Ex: Nevada/Battle Born Specimen that sold for $102,000 in Stacks Bowers 8/2012 ANA World's Fair of Money Auction. There is currently one in the NGC POP Report, the MS62. Oddly, two of the four previously certified uncirculated specimens are no longer in graded holders. Stacks Bowers wrote: The 1870-CC half eagle is obtainable in Mint State. It is exceedingly rare at that level, however, the title of finest known held by the Battle Born specimen certified MS-61 by PCGS that realized $105,750 in our August 2012 sale of that fabulous collection. The only other Mint State example known, ranked CC#2 for the issue, is the coin that has most recently been certified MS-62 by NGC. What happened to the other two MS graded NGC specimens?

    Recently the Midwestern Specimen reappeared in an 8/2021 Stacks Bowers Auction on Rarities Night at the ANA. This time it was described as: Offered is one of the finest known survivors of this historic and popular, yet also rare and conditionally challenging Carson City Mint gold issue. A beautiful coin drenched in vivid rose-apricot color, both sides retain nearly complete mint luster in a soft satin texture. The persistent viewer aided by direct lighting will also see modest semi-reflective qualities in the fields - highly attractive. The strike is commensurate with the Winter Die State II attribution, the central obverse high points above and below Liberty's ear a bit soft and the top of the shield and the eagle's head and neck quite blunt in the center of the reverse. Otherwise we note razor sharp striking detail to all design elements. Impressively smooth in hand for a lightly circulated early date CC-Mint gold coin, there are no sizeable or otherwise individually distracting marks. For provenance purposes only we mention four tiny nicks in the left obverse field that one will need a loupe to discern: one before Liberty's mouth, two midway between star 4 and the bridge of Liberty's nose, and one between stars 4 and 5. Far better preserved and infinitely more attractive than the vast majority of survivors from this challenging issue, this coin is destined for inclusion in a high quality half eagle cabinet or collection of Carson City Mint coinage.

    The coin has a PCGS value of $110,000. The AU58 without a CAC sticker realized $150,000. I am not certain that Mr. Hansen purchased the coin in auction, if he did, then certainly this is a coin the Mr. Hansen paid up to obtained.

    1870-CC Liberty Head Half Eagle AU58
    PCGS POP 1/1, Condition Census Top Five
    Certification #06660596, PCGS #8320
    PCGS Price Guide Value: $110,000 / Realized $150,000 in 8/2021 Auction
    Ex: Midwestern Collection

    My 20th Century Type Set, With Type Variations---started : 9/22/1997 ---- completed : 1/7/2004

    My 20th Century Gold Major Design Type Set ---started : 11/17/1997 ---- completed : 1/21/2004
  • cccoinscccoins Posts: 226 ✭✭✭

    Diana - very nice post and thoughts. Welcome to the forum.

  • WaterSportWaterSport Posts: 6,220 ✭✭✭✭✭

    We appreciate you stopping by!!

    WS

    Proud recipient of the coveted PCGS Forum "You Suck" Award Thursday July 19, 2007 11:33 PM and December 30th, 2011 at 8:50 PM.
  • MFeldMFeld Posts: 6,519 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @DLR87 said:
    I wanted to share a moment I had with my Dad, D. L. Hansen, tonight.

    I found some of his first coin sets from when he was a child while helping him move out of his home of 30+ years.

    When we looked through the Whitman books we realized from some of his notes that he started these sets around 1964! He would have been around 11 years old (possibly younger) when he started building these sets. In one of his type sets he had a 1822 & 1844 Morgan, 1922 peace dollar, 1926 standing liberty quarter, 1914 liberty head, and a 1900 barber quarter He really has been an avid collector since childhood.

    Building the D. L. Hansen collection has been a lifelong dream of his. He helped me build my first collection, a set of Lincoln’s, when I was a child. Working alongside my Dad again with his collection has been an amazing experience.

    PS- Thank you to everyone that has contributed to the “Hansen Watch”. I have learned so much from your posts!

    Sincerely,
    Diana

    Welcome, Diana and thanks so much for posting that.

    I'm probably not the only one who's wondering, so will ask - do you recall what denomination the 1822 and 1844 coins were? (as with those dates, they couldn't be Morgan dollars).

    Mark Feld* of Heritage Auctions

    *Unless otherwise noted, my posts here represent my own personal opinions.

  • amwldcoinamwldcoin Posts: 9,920 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I knew when I saw you post you would be the one calling her out on those dates! :D Most Likely they are 1882 + 1884 but it really doesn't mater!

    @MFeld said:

    @DLR87 said:
    I wanted to share a moment I had with my Dad, D. L. Hansen, tonight.

    I found some of his first coin sets from when he was a child while helping him move out of his home of 30+ years.

    When we looked through the Whitman books we realized from some of his notes that he started these sets around 1964! He would have been around 11 years old (possibly younger) when he started building these sets. In one of his type sets he had a 1822 & 1844 Morgan, 1922 peace dollar, 1926 standing liberty quarter, 1914 liberty head, and a 1900 barber quarter He really has been an avid collector since childhood.

    Building the D. L. Hansen collection has been a lifelong dream of his. He helped me build my first collection, a set of Lincoln’s, when I was a child. Working alongside my Dad again with his collection has been an amazing experience.

    PS- Thank you to everyone that has contributed to the “Hansen Watch”. I have learned so much from your posts!

    Sincerely,
    Diana

    Welcome, Diana and thanks so much for posting that.

    I'm probably not the only one who's wondering, so will ask - do you recall what denomination the 1822 and 1844 coins were? (as with those dates, they couldn't be Morgan dollars).

  • ZoinsZoins Posts: 29,305 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Welcome to the forums Diana! What a wonderful way to share time with your father!

  • dbldie55dbldie55 Posts: 7,504 ✭✭✭✭✭

    A whitman folder starts it off. How many of us have the same story?

    Collector and Researcher of Liberty Head Nickels. ANA LM-6053
  • alefzeroalefzero Posts: 191 ✭✭✭

    @JBatDavidLawrence said:

    @ms70 said:
    There's a lot of Hansen coins on eBay currently.

    Even more on our website!

    Yeah, there is one I have had my eye one. Just trying to justify buying it to myself.

  • nagsnags Posts: 744 ✭✭✭

    That is really cool. You should have the Whitman folder framed with some inscription plaque at the bottom as the genesis of the collection.

  • GazesGazes Posts: 2,161 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @DLR87 said:
    I must have mistyped since I wrote it on my phone. I should have known this group would catch any errors 😂 Hopefully my photos show up this time. Here’s photos from one of his childhood type sets.

    Awesome! The dates are almost irrelevant. Just shows the passion your dad has had his whole life for coins. Thanks for sharing with us!

  • MFeldMFeld Posts: 6,519 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @DLR87 said:
    I must have mistyped since I wrote it on my phone. I should have known this group would catch any errors 😂 Hopefully my photos show up this time. Here’s photos from one of his childhood type sets.

    It's heartwarming to see you post about your collecting experiences with your dad.

    Mark Feld* of Heritage Auctions

    *Unless otherwise noted, my posts here represent my own personal opinions.

  • JonJetJonJet Posts: 352 ✭✭✭

    I have 115 Sets...

    And I've dropped the Mighty Hansen by a ranking or two on several occasions...and no coin exists in My collection prior to 1957

    All He needs to do is update a few coins to get His ranking back...but the record remains forever

  • ZoinsZoins Posts: 29,305 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @DLR87 These old albums are so amazing and a part of history now. It's great to see that your father was collecting these great coins at 11 years old!

    It would be amazing if a TPG would encapsulate and certify entire pages. It would be great for PCGS to do it but perhaps ATS since they do GSA and Ike softpacks?

    Do you still have your cent collection today and to you still collect?

  • @Zoins said:
    @DLR87 These old albums are so amazing and a part of history now. It's great to see that your father was collecting these great coins at 11 years old!

    It would be amazing if a TPG would encapsulate and certify entire pages. It would be great for PCGS to do it but perhaps ATS since they do GSA and Ike softpacks?

    Do you still have your cent collection today and to you still collect?

    I would like to find a way to display this original collection.

    I still have my original cent collection. I didn’t really start collecting again until the last 4-5 years alongside my dad. I have been helping my dad with organizing his collection the past few years. While doing that I have been building a few of my own sets. It’s been a unique experience and I am still very much a novice collector 🙂

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