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Post your "Epic" coins

BoosibriBoosibri Posts: 11,873 ✭✭✭✭✭

adjective
heroic or grand in scale or character.
"his epic journey around the world"
synonyms: ambitious, heroic, grand, arduous, extraordinary, Herculean; More

Could make for a fun thread...

This is the only 8 Escudos of Charles IV in 65 or above (made 65 at both NGC then PCGS), from any mint of any date. How about you, any epic coins?

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    goldengolden Posts: 9,069 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Super coin!

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    giorgio11giorgio11 Posts: 3,821 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Boosibri they don't get much epic'er than that!

    Kind regards,

    George

    VDBCoins.com Our Registry Sets Many successful BSTs; pls ask.
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    bolivarshagnastybolivarshagnasty Posts: 7,350 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I don't think I have ever owned an "epic" coin. I will have to put that on the list.

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    thebeavthebeav Posts: 3,755 ✭✭✭✭✭

    That Pius IX medal is insane !!!

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    lkeigwinlkeigwin Posts: 16,887 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @JRocco said:
    Awesome Charles IV Boosibri.
    I hope I am not stepping on this thread by posting a medal instead of a true coin, but this is a really strong medal.

    Here is a Pope Pius IX 1854 Papal Medal, work of engraver Bianchi. I will let the medal speak the rest for itself, and please understand I take lousy pictures.
    Just look at the details on this piece. It is a large medal and I have included a pic of the full obverse next to a Mercury dime for comparison.
    Note the detail in this first pic, the lettering for example, compared to the entire medal when shown full size, both obverse and reverse.

    I want that. Wow.
    Lance.

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    rickoricko Posts: 98,724 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Wow... Epic coins/medals....Now I will have to think about this, and likely go into 'deep storage'....I must have one - or two - in my vast holdings... ;) Cheers, RickO

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    tradedollarnuttradedollarnut Posts: 20,147 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I'll bite. Huh?

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    kazkaz Posts: 9,067 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Zoins said:
    Possibly the only privately available plasters of an accepted coin design? Of course, it was subsequently unaccepted ;)

    I think for the Indian in the foreground, that was a setting sun.

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    1630Boston1630Boston Posts: 13,772 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Yes, the Papal Medal is a true work of art , thanks for sharing it here :smile:

    Successful transactions with : MICHAELDIXON, Manorcourtman, Bochiman, bolivarshagnasty, AUandAG, onlyroosies, chumley, Weiss, jdimmick, BAJJERFAN, gene1978, TJM965, Smittys, GRANDAM, JTHawaii, mainejoe, softparade, derryb

    Bad transactions with : nobody to date

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    BillJonesBillJones Posts: 33,486 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I didn't know about the very early die state of the Libertas Americanas medal. All the pieces I have seen had the die chips on them. Thanks for sharing.

    Retired dealer and avid collector of U.S. type coins, 19th century presidential campaign medalets and selected medals. In recent years I have been working on a set of British coins - at least one coin from each king or queen who issued pieces that are collectible. I am also collecting at least one coin for each Roman emperor from Julius Caesar to ... ?
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    1630Boston1630Boston Posts: 13,772 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @SkyMan
    I truly never tire of your postings concerning space exploration.................and coins :smile:
    Thanks :smile:

    Truly amazing photo...........correct me if I am wrong but were those helmet face shields and space suits made at "David Clark" in Worcester ?

    Successful transactions with : MICHAELDIXON, Manorcourtman, Bochiman, bolivarshagnasty, AUandAG, onlyroosies, chumley, Weiss, jdimmick, BAJJERFAN, gene1978, TJM965, Smittys, GRANDAM, JTHawaii, mainejoe, softparade, derryb

    Bad transactions with : nobody to date

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    Jinx86Jinx86 Posts: 3,671 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Only known specimen in mint state at any grading service. PCGS MS65.

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    lkeigwinlkeigwin Posts: 16,887 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I thought long and hard about this and concluded I have no epic coins. :'(

    But I enjoyed the thread.
    Lance.

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    jwittenjwitten Posts: 5,077 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @SkyMan said:
    Gold coin that flew on Gemini 4, where Ed White II had the First American walk in space (the second space walk in history).


    I NEED THIS COIN!!! If you ever sell, PLEASE let me know! That is so cool!

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    topstuftopstuf Posts: 14,803 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Is that space gold so designated on the slab?
    Cool.
    Closest I got is a Franklin Mint "moon medal" made from a MIX of ....some....silver that went to the moon.

    But it's probably as close as SILVER will ever get "todamoon." :p

    Aw that's mean. But I do think silver is silly.

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    SkyManSkyMan Posts: 9,493 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @1630Boston said:
    @SkyMan
    I truly never tire of your postings concerning space exploration.................and coins :smile:
    Thanks :smile:

    Truly amazing photo...........correct me if I am wrong but were those helmet face shields and space suits made at "David Clark" in Worcester ?

    Thank you!

    I believe you are correct. I am not exactly sure if it was a name change or not a year or two later, but the Apollo suits were made by ILC Dover.

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    crazyhounddogcrazyhounddog Posts: 13,817 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited September 21, 2017 11:04AM

    I'm afraid I have nothing epic in my collection. I guess I'm just an average guy.
    Great thread as I enjoy looking at these pieces.
    That Hannibal coin, SmEagle1795, posted is over the top, elephant and all,

    The bitterness of "Poor Quality" is remembered long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten.
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    northcoinnorthcoin Posts: 4,987 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited September 21, 2017 11:35AM

    @BillJones said:

    >

    Here is a coinwith an epic history, the 1848 CAL. quarter eagle. The U.S. Army in California gathered up 230 ounces of gold bullion from various sources. These included mines, prospectors who panned for gold and the custom house in San Francisco.

    Lucien Lozier took that bullion in a tea catty from California by ship to Columbia where he boarded another ship that took him to Panama. He crossed Panama by land to the other side where he boarded another ship that took him to Cuba. From there another ship took him to New Orleans. He may have boarded a ship to the east coast from there, but the preferred route was to use the railroad system to Washington, DC. That’s how soldiers were moved from New Orleans to the east coast during the Mexican War.

    Overall the trip took him about three and a half months to complete. He left California in late August, 1848 and arrived in Washington, DC during the first week of December. That was quite an epic trip for this little piece of gold.

    I think it was a tea caddy (also described as a small oyster can), but for anyone wanting an even more detailed account check out Q. David Bowers tome, "A California Gold Rush History." He devotes several pages to the history of the 1848 CAL. quarter eagle.

    Of particular interest to me was the likelihood that it was Chief Coin Designer James B. Longacre who added the CAL. designation after it had been suggested by the then Secretary of War. (Longacres's estate had in it three First Strike "Proof" pieces that he had held onto along with a similar First Strike "Proof" 1850 Double Eagle that he had designed and which is now in my own personal collection. Reference "first mint's" post in the below linked thread.)

    https://forums.collectors.com/discussion/620118/collecting-coins-with-a-story-a-k-a-provenance/p1

    So I guess, to be responsive to the OP's post, here is my "epic coin", the details of which are referenced above and set forth in the subject link.

    (Of added interest to this thread, the poster "first strike" identified above is Karl Moulton to whom MrEureka (Andy Lustig) also made reference in his post on this same thread crediting Karl Moulton for having determined the attribution for his rare coin. :| )

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    BillJonesBillJones Posts: 33,486 ✭✭✭✭✭

    From my readings, the "oyster can" was the container that held the gold from the Customs House.

    Retired dealer and avid collector of U.S. type coins, 19th century presidential campaign medalets and selected medals. In recent years I have been working on a set of British coins - at least one coin from each king or queen who issued pieces that are collectible. I am also collecting at least one coin for each Roman emperor from Julius Caesar to ... ?
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    northcoinnorthcoin Posts: 4,987 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @BillJones said:
    From my readings, the "oyster can" was the container that held the gold from the Customs House.

    That does seem to make sense, but then again the description may simply be referring to how the lid was attached rather than size. In any event, this is the quote from the above referenced writing by Q. David Bower in his "A California Gold Rush History" at page 114:

    "Colonel R.B. Masson, Jr., acting governor, shipped the metal ... to the East via ... Loeser, who carried it in a small oyster can, or more elegantly, a tea caddy."

    Thereafter an original source is quoted

    ".... Captain Folsom bought an oyster-can full at $10 the ounce ..." and the narrative goes on to describe transport by ship.

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