What coins have dropped in value most in the last few years?

Jefferson nickels?

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Comments

  • zodiac65zodiac65 Posts: 251 ✭✭✭

    Proof Barber coins? Especially those grade 67 and lower, and non-Cameo/non-DC, seemed to really take a big hit.

    I lost some money on every single PCGS graded Barber proof that I sold in 2018, so NGC graded would be a nightmare to move right now.

    "They lost because their phenoms failed to phenominate." - Yogi Berra
  • BillJonesBillJones Posts: 27,127 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @JBK said:
    Most anything I own.

    Yea, I know the feeling. Even the early U.S. coins I have seem to have lost value.

    Retired dealer and avid collector of U.S. type coins, 19th century presidential campaign medalets and selected medals. In recent years I have been working on a set of British coins - at least one coin from each king or queen who issued pieces that are collectible.
  • zodiac65zodiac65 Posts: 251 ✭✭✭

    Others have also commented before on EAC, and the recent auction results for the really big collections.

    The high-grade, eye-candy, type sold well, for the registry competitions. The NC's in contrast were almost all bargains.

    Anything low-grade, and more common than Rarity-4, also seemed to lose major mojo.

    "They lost because their phenoms failed to phenominate." - Yogi Berra
  • GluggoGluggo Posts: 2,169 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited February 10, 2019 3:35PM

    ASE 2016-S San Fransico Labels FDOI and 2016-P Plillidelphia Green Label FDOI American Silver Dollar PCGS 70 graded coins.
    Paid a bunch Probably worth $36.00 now loss of investment.
    Not to mention when will the milk spots form? They will melt value when that happens. Mike Mesiak guaranteed they would be a good investment.

  • 1999 silver proof sets

  • 1peter12231peter1223 Posts: 363 ✭✭✭
    edited February 10, 2019 3:58PM

    @BillJones said:

    @JBK said:
    Most anything I own.

    Yea, I know the feeling. Even the early U.S. coins I have seem to have lost value.

    Bill , IMO it's "almost" everything across board . But especially common date type coins ( Barber , Seated, etc . ) in high grade Proof or MS .
    If its in an NGC holder even tougher to sell .

    I know there are some who say the market is doing great , it's strong as ever , and so on . The auctions i have been following on generic stuff tell otherwise . Smh .

  • BillJonesBillJones Posts: 27,127 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @PerryHall said:

    @BillJones said:
    Classic commemoratives have to be the worst.

    When I retired a decade ago, I blew out the classic commemorative coins I had in stock for 25 or 30 percent under Graysheet bid. As things have turned out, that was a good move.

    Sounds like a buying opportunity to me. Very neat series with 50 design types for the silver coins with no real stoppers in the set.

    I hope you are right. I am sitting on a “collector grade” type set.

    Retired dealer and avid collector of U.S. type coins, 19th century presidential campaign medalets and selected medals. In recent years I have been working on a set of British coins - at least one coin from each king or queen who issued pieces that are collectible.
  • 1peter12231peter1223 Posts: 363 ✭✭✭

    @PerryHall said:

    Sounds like a buying opportunity to me. Very neat series with 50 design types for the silver coins with no real stoppers in the set.

    Could be but many other series is like catching a falling knife .

    Caveat Emptor .

  • ZoinsZoins Posts: 17,397 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @PerryHall said:

    @BillJones said:
    Classic commemoratives have to be the worst.

    When I retired a decade ago, I blew out the classic commemorative coins I had in stock for 25 or 30 percent under Graysheet bid. As things have turned out, that was a good move.

    Sounds like a buying opportunity to me. Very neat series with 50 design types for the silver coins with no real stoppers in the set.

    I hope it works out for people buying. I’m more comfortable with auction prices than fixed prices for these.

  • thebigengthebigeng Posts: 5,651 ✭✭✭✭✭

    1984 proof sets...! :)

    “Remember that sometimes not getting what you want is a wonderful stroke of luck.” ~ Dalai Lama
  • MartinMartin Posts: 93 ✭✭✭

    RFA. Collect what you like the average collector will not make money on his collection it's a hobby have fun with it. Good dealers make money at it its their trade serious collector / investors may make a little here and their but they have spent a lot of time and money learning the hobby. Have fun and collect what you like.

    Martin

  • CoinPhysicistCoinPhysicist Posts: 350 ✭✭✭
    edited February 10, 2019 4:20PM

    Proof walkers seem to have taken a massive dive. In PCGS PR 65, 1936's were selling for 4000-6000 each about 10 years ago. Fast forward to January 2019 and a beautiful PCGS PR 65 CAC coin just went for $2280 including BP. Still dropping from where they were just a year or 2 ago.

    Successful transactions with: wondercoin

  • SoldiSoldi Posts: 634 ✭✭✭✭

    @zodiac65 said:
    Others have also commented before on EAC, and the recent auction results for the really big collections.

    The high-grade, eye-candy, type sold well, for the registry competitions. The NC's in contrast were almost all bargains.

    Anything low-grade, and more common than Rarity-4, also seemed to lose major mojo.

    I appreciate this answer as I think the "big boys" aren't supporting this market any longer. Looks like the tide has turned for the "hobby" of copper "rarity" rating coins. I once used Rod Burress to bid for me (RIP) and one time the last time in fact. I said; "Enough with the pricing of mid-date copper" and pulled away from buying ever again. Of course I had many pieces and consigned them to CVM and he sold them for me. The market for coins was good in those days, but prices for "not really rare coins" was too high. This story is 15 years ago in my life.

    Now, I buy what I like or I know someone else who will like the coins

  • ZoinsZoins Posts: 17,397 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @ReadyFireAim said:

    @Martin said:
    The ones you want to sell. Just ask any dealer

    I can't even get the same dealer to give me a good price on upgrade when I offer his own coin back.
    (and gold has gone up since then)

    This is a really stupid hobby and I promise to stop it soon. B)

    There was a thread called something like "Dealers that buy back strong" but I can't seem to find it any more. Some dealers offer a two way market for their coins but others not so much.

  • ZoinsZoins Posts: 17,397 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Martin said:
    RFA. Collect what you like the average collector will not make money on his collection it's a hobby have fun with it. Good dealers make money at it its their trade serious collector / investors may make a little here and their but they have spent a lot of time and money learning the hobby. Have fun and collect what you like.

    Martin

    I'm not sure @ReadyFireAim was asking to make money on upgrades, but a good price, which still can be a minor loss or same price.

    If people want to make money, it's possible but they may need to adjusting their collecting approaches.

  • jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 5,783 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @ReadyFireAim said:

    @jmlanzaf said:
    I tried to sell my golf clubs back to the pro shop so I could buy a better set and they refused to even make an offer. I was >willing to sell them at the original purchase price and they wouldn't even consider it!

    I don't understand...
    Your golf clubs would have been used & not made from something that could have gone up in value.
    Are you trolling me?

    I'm pointing out that it's a hobby, not an investment.

  • KollectorKingKollectorKing Posts: 4,320 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Zoins said:

    @ReadyFireAim said:

    @Martin said:
    The ones you want to sell. Just ask any dealer

    I can't even get the same dealer to give me a good price on upgrade when I offer his own coin back.
    (and gold has gone up since then)

    This is a really stupid hobby and I promise to stop it soon. B)

    There was a thread called something like "Dealers that buy back strong" but I can't seem to find it any more. Some dealers offer a two way market for their coins but others not so much.

    Is this the thread?

    https://forums.collectors.com/discussion/1009021/dealers-who-will-buy-anything-at-fair-prices

  • sniocsusniocsu Posts: 1,149 ✭✭✭

    Classic commems and maybe common date mid to late non branch mint gold. I have picked up a few commems as the prices have stabilized a little bit. But in general; if it isn’t top top pop the prices have fallen and I don’t see us nearing the end of it. Any lower MS common gold used to carry with it a nice premium; now I can go into some brick and mortars and find it being blown out for spot plus 30-50.

  • claychaserclaychaser Posts: 4,343 ✭✭✭

    Very common modern coins in less than top grades.



    ==Looking for pre WW2 Commems in PCGS Rattler holders, 1851-O Three Cent Silvers in all grades



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  • BillJonesBillJones Posts: 27,127 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The pricing has really changed. For the first 40 years as a collector, I bought really nice collector grade material, held it for a decade and could sell virtually any of it for a profit. Now that is no longer the case. Prices are stagnant or going down. Everything hinges on the grading holder and a sticker, not the coin.

    Even then, as someone indicated with 1936 Proof half dollars, the pieces with the right credentials are getting hit. I bought a PR-66 example that I though was outstanding for grade for “Sheet money.” I guess that was a mistake too.

    Retired dealer and avid collector of U.S. type coins, 19th century presidential campaign medalets and selected medals. In recent years I have been working on a set of British coins - at least one coin from each king or queen who issued pieces that are collectible.
  • logger7logger7 Posts: 4,023 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Quality and cac coins before 1932 or so have done ok; moderns are just too risky, as well as esoteric, small and high population coins.

  • ElcontadorElcontador Posts: 6,554 ✭✭✭✭

    If the coin is from the mid 19th Century forward, and is not top drawer registry set material, chances are better than not that it has lost value in the last ten years.

    "Vou invadir o Nordeste,
    "Seu cabra da peste,
    "Sou Mangueira......."
  • RogerBRogerB Posts: 6,889 ✭✭✭✭✭

    RE: "Generic gold and the premiums are ridiculously low."

    No, the price of gold is too high to permit new collectors to enter the hobby and enjoy it to a similar extent as bronze and silver coins. The cost over bullion is really unimportant.

  • amwldcoinamwldcoin Posts: 5,130 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited February 10, 2019 7:27PM

    Collectors ride out the storm. Investors Panic! That's My humble opinion for the drag on the market. It may take time but I think it will come back!

    Edit to add...I am just as much a collector as a dealer!

  • zodiac65zodiac65 Posts: 251 ✭✭✭

    Yes, the collector spirit is always a critical component.

    However, collectors need a broad enough market, to acquire, upgrade, and eventually, sell if there is no next-generation home for their collection.

    There are too many numismatic items in total, so the market will have to be there, and also rebound soon.

    Otherwise, what happens when the millions of collectors currently aged 50 thru 100+, need to cash-out?

    "They lost because their phenoms failed to phenominate." - Yogi Berra
  • fcfc Posts: 12,696 ✭✭✭

    I wish gold would tank and I could buy again for the prices I did years ago. Common half eagle collecting was fun at 200 or 300 a pop with eye appeal.

  • bronco2078bronco2078 Posts: 6,666 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @BillJones said:
    The pricing has really changed. For the first 40 years as a collector, I bought really nice collector grade material, held it for a decade and could sell virtually any of it for a profit. Now that is no longer the case. Prices are stagnant or going down. Everything hinges on the grading holder and a sticker, not the coin.

    Even then, as someone indicated with 1936 Proof half dollars, the pieces with the right credentials are getting hit. I bought a PR-66 example that I though was outstanding for grade for “Sheet money.” I guess that was a mistake too.

    The gold window closed and fiat money bubbled up everything. Now we are going in a different direction

  • ErrorsOnCoinsErrorsOnCoins Posts: 9,185 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Markets go up and markets go down.

    You can take advantage of either move depending on what you want to do.

  • jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 5,783 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @RogerB said:
    RE: "Generic gold and the premiums are ridiculously low."

    No, the price of gold is too high to permit new collectors to enter the hobby and enjoy it to a similar extent as bronze and silver coins. The cost over bullion is really unimportant.

    Your "no" is misplaced. You aren't disagreeing with the statement, you are supplying one possible explanation for it.

    The premium over bullion indicates collector demand. The lack of a premium indicates little collector demand which MAY well be due to the cost of entry for new collectors, as you posit.

    I would also point out that the premium over bullion for 63/64 Saints was HIGHER when gold was HIGHER, which argues against your suggestion (high entry cost) being the sole reason for the premium drop.

  • jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 5,783 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @amwldcoin said:
    Collectors ride out the storm. Investors Panic! That's My humble opinion for the drag on the market. It may take time but I think it will come back!

    Edit to add...I am just as much a collector as a dealer!

    There's some truth to this. But, I'd like to make two additional points:
    1. There are "collectors" with shallow pockets who worry about the value of their collections. They aren't strictly in either camp exclusively.
    2. There is economic psychology at play. When prices are rising, collectors (buyers) want to jump in while the item is still affordable. When prices are dropping, collectors (buyers) want to wait to try and get a better deal.

  • GazesGazes Posts: 1,213 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @BillJones said:
    The pricing has really changed. For the first 40 years as a collector, I bought really nice collector grade material, held it for a decade and could sell virtually any of it for a profit. Now that is no longer the case. Prices are stagnant or going down. Everything hinges on the grading holder and a sticker, not the coin.

    Even then, as someone indicated with 1936 Proof half dollars, the pieces with the right credentials are getting hit. I bought a PR-66 example that I though was outstanding for grade for “Sheet money.” I guess that was a mistake too.

    Every money making venture changes over time and requires people to change with it. Whether your in medicine, law, etc. those businesses are far different today than 20 years ago. Look at what the internet has done to retail businesses---adapt or close down (i.e bookstores, Sears, etc). Coins are no different. One can not do what you did 20 years ago over and over and make money. There are plenty of coins that have gone up---you just have to adapt as the coin market changes.

  • shorecollshorecoll Posts: 4,705 ✭✭✭✭

    I could argue there should be no premium for "generic" gold. When it was coming back from Europe piecemeal...OK, but when it's coming back by the ton it is just a commodity. Maybe if inflation becomes an issue we'll see spreads widen.

    ANA-LM, NBS, EAC
  • lkeneficlkenefic Posts: 4,256 ✭✭✭✭

    @PerryHall said:

    Sounds like a buying opportunity to me. Very neat series with 50 design types for the silver coins with no real stoppers in the set.

    I'm proceeding cautiously with this set. I don't buy often, but when I do it's coins with good eye appeal for the grade... target grades 45-55. That said, there are a few pieces that really haven't come down all that much... Classic Head Large Cents for one...

    Collecting ... dust

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  • ParadisefoundParadisefound Posts: 6,422 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The ones I want haven't tick down a bit ....... still waiting and waiting :( IMHO the commes are down considerably since I started collecting over a year ago.

  • batumibatumi Posts: 343 ✭✭✭

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @amwldcoin said:
    Collectors ride out the storm. Investors Panic! That's My humble opinion for the drag on the market. It may take time but I think it will come back!

    Edit to add...I am just as much a collector as a dealer!

    There's some truth to this. But, I'd like to make two additional points:
    1. There are "collectors" with shallow pockets who worry about the value of their collections. They aren't strictly in either camp exclusively.
    2. There is economic psychology at play. When prices are rising, collectors (buyers) want to jump in while the item is still affordable. When prices are dropping, collectors (buyers) want to wait to try and get a better deal.

    Metals always run in cycles. The adage 'buy low, sell high' seems simple in theory though not so easy in practice. Herd mentality can be dangerous to one's pocketbook. I try to do the opposite of the 'herd'

  • batumibatumi Posts: 343 ✭✭✭

    @CoinPhysicist said:
    Proof walkers seem to have taken a massive dive. In PCGS PR 65, 1936's were selling for 4000-6000 each about 10 years ago. Fast forward to January 2019 and a beautiful PCGS PR 65 CAC coin just went for $2280 including BP. Still dropping from where they were just a year or 2 ago.

    Present prices are very attractive for this popular and beautiful seven coin series and really nice ones are sometimes availe for little to no premium over some that are not so nice. I am also a believer in the modern gold commems. At the present bullion related prices on some MS and PR 70's a good way to stack some metal with a collector angle.

  • TwoSides2aCoinTwoSides2aCoin Posts: 40,236 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Widgets. Of course that's my entire inventory.

    BBB Business Before Bureacracy

  • batumibatumi Posts: 343 ✭✭✭

    Washington quarters have taken a beating the last few years. Near give away prices on some really nice 65's and 66's. Imo a great time to build or upgrade a set of these. Most issues from the forties, fifties and sixties can be had for less than $30. while being tough to find.

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