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Why are Slugs not called Half Unions?

ZoinsZoins Posts: 33,893 ✭✭✭✭✭
edited October 21, 2017 12:52AM in U.S. Coin Forum

$50 gold coins are generally called slugs but $50 gold patterns are generally called half unions.

  • Why are the coins called slugs and not half unions?
  • Why are the patterns called half unions and not slugs?
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    BillJonesBillJones Posts: 33,484 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited October 21, 2017 9:39AM

    The half union was a U.S. Mint pattern that was struck in 1877. The "slug" or California $50 gold piece was a private issue which had a semi-official status if it was once struck in the early 1850s by The U.S. assay office in San Francisco. The slug was struck in a different era before the concept of the "union" and "half union" was conceived.

    Retired dealer and avid collector of U.S. type coins, 19th century presidential campaign medalets and selected medals. In recent years I have been working on a set of British coins - at least one coin from each king or queen who issued pieces that are collectible. I am also collecting at least one coin for each Roman emperor from Julius Caesar to ... ?
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    jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,943 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited October 21, 2017 5:00AM

    Why aren't they called Quintuple Eagles?

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    jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,943 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Why aren't 1 oz. gold eagles called Half Unions?

    Why are gold eagles called eagles when an eagle is a $10 gold coin? Shouldn't only the quarter ounce AGE be called an eagle at all?

    And if silver eagles are silver eagles, why aren't Morgan or Peace Dollars silver eagles?

    So many questions before my morning coffee? :wink:

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    BuffaloIronTailBuffaloIronTail Posts: 7,413 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @jmlanzaf said:
    Why aren't 1 oz. gold eagles called Half Unions?

    Why are gold eagles called eagles when an eagle is a $10 gold coin? Shouldn't only the quarter ounce AGE be called an eagle at all?

    And if silver eagles are silver eagles, why aren't Morgan or Peace Dollars silver eagles?

    So many questions before my morning coffee? :wink:

    You just gave me a HUGE headache...................and I already had one cup.

    Pete

    "I tell them there's no problems.....only solutions" - John Lennon
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    giorgio11giorgio11 Posts: 3,821 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @jmlanzaf said:
    Why aren't they called Quintuple Eagles?

    They were called several things, including quintuple eagles, quints, adobes, slugs, ingots (they were basically considered only so much gold in coin shape, witness the open --D--C on the earliest $50 varieties, leaving the possibility of odd dollars and cents amounts to be entered). See the Redbook, page 391 in the 2017 edition.

    Also. The American Silver Eagle is a design, not a denomination. That's why Morgans or Peace aren't. They are dollars. ASEs are dollars of a different design.

    Kind regards,

    George

    VDBCoins.com Our Registry Sets Many successful BSTs; pls ask.
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    jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,943 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @giorgio11 said:

    @jmlanzaf said:
    Why aren't they called Quintuple Eagles?

    They were called several things, including quintuple eagles, quints, adobes, slugs, ingots (they were basically considered only so much gold in coin shape, witness the open --D--C on the earliest $50 varieties, leaving the possibility of odd dollars and cents amounts to be entered). See the Redbook, page 391 in the 2017 edition.

    Also. The American Silver Eagle is a design, not a denomination. That's why Morgans or Peace aren't. They are dollars. ASEs are dollars of a different design.

    Kind regards,

    George

    thank you, but it was a joke.

    Althougn morgan and peace dollars have eagles on them. In fact the design element are the same: liberty obverse, eagle reverse

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    rickoricko Posts: 98,724 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Do questions such as this keep people awake nights?? :D Honestly, such things do not even occur to me...While coins are super important to me, I have so many other things to do, I just do not have time to ponder the imponderable.... :D;) Cheers, RickO

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    messydeskmessydesk Posts: 19,704 ✭✭✭✭✭

    From the Red Book, "... was known variously as a slug, quintuple eagle, or five-eagle piece. It was officially termed an ingot."

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    ZoinsZoins Posts: 33,893 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @jmlanzaf said:
    Why aren't they called Quintuple Eagles?

    Apparently they were but it seems something changed to make the term less popular.

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    BillDugan1959BillDugan1959 Posts: 3,821 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I agree with ricko. Some people are trying a little too hard. Collecting coins is very important in my life, but these questions would never occur to me.

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    ZoinsZoins Posts: 33,893 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited October 21, 2017 9:26AM

    Everyone collects their own way. Learning is a big part of numismatics. Here specifically, some may like etymology while others don't.

    There are some great answers and info above! I personally am thankful for the posters above and the Red Book for trying hard :)

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    keetskeets Posts: 25,351 ✭✭✭✭✭

    having these questions come across my plane of thought is one thing, spending any energy or time to figure them out is another.

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    giorgio11giorgio11 Posts: 3,821 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Some people need more fresh air and sunshine ....

    Kind regards,

    George

    VDBCoins.com Our Registry Sets Many successful BSTs; pls ask.
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    jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,943 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I'm surprised some people are raining on this thread. Asking questions about history or etymology is a great way to explore numismatics. I joked around on this thread, but I actually found the basic information that came out on the thread to be interesting.

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