Home U.S. Coin Forum
Options

Holes in 19th Century Presidential Campaign Tokens

BillJonesBillJones Posts: 33,484 ✭✭✭✭✭

The discussion on holes lead me to write to this response which I decided should be posted as a new discussion:

Acceptable holes are most frequently found on political pieces. The hole made it possible to wear the piece on your shirt or coat similar to the way people wear political campaign buttons today.

I have found some pieces with the original hanging device attached to it, mostly from the 1880s. Here is an example. This piece was issued for James G. Blain's 1884 presidential campaign.

And here is an example of the same variety without a hole. Blaine was known was "the plumed knight" during his campaign. That nickname came from a speech that one of his supporters gave in which he gave Blain that title. Blaine had a checkered past as a politician. He took a lot of money from the railroad industry which led some people chant, "Blain! Blain! The continental liar from the state of Maine!"


Sometimes a piece of string that was used to tie medalet to an article of clothing is still intact, as it is on this 1840 Martin Van Buren token.


But the hole is not always a good thing. This Jackson piece is also collected as a Hard Times Token. The token collectors usually don't like a hole in a piece unless the hole is almost always found on the piece. Therefore I purchased this token cheap. (Normally this token sells for $300 to $400. I got this one for $75.) Note that the hole is filled with something like plaster. You see this now and then on such pieces, perhaps as a way to make the token more acceptable to some eyes.


And here is an example that is not nice, but it sold for a lot more because it is not holed.


Retired dealer and avid collector of U.S. type coins, 19th century presidential campaign medalets and selected medals. In recent years I have been working on a set of British coins - at least one coin from each king or queen who issued pieces that are collectible. I am also collecting at least one coin for each Roman emperor from Julius Caesar to ... ?

Comments

  • Options
    ChangeInHistoryChangeInHistory Posts: 3,008 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Very neat and interesting, your posts are always good history lessons.

    For political token collectors, is there a big premium when the original cloth, twine, or hanging device is attached?

  • Options
    BroadstruckBroadstruck Posts: 30,497 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I'm generally not a fan of anything holed for suspension :s

    So below is the only piece in my collection as the hole location is in the rim and doesn't interfere with the design elements of the medal.

    1840 William Henry Harrison, Bunker Hill Jubilee Presidential Campaign Medal, DeWitt-WHH-1840-4 / Satterlee-71, 43mm Diameter, White Metal.

    One of the original 1840 issued medals worn as a badge during the Bunker Hill dedication celebration. This was one of the first political medals struck by Boston medalists Francis N. Mitchell. All of the originals are seen holed for suspension directly on the rim above the N in Henry. Already considered scarce in 1862 by Alfred H. Satterlee and by W. Elliott Woodward who offered a so called original tin in poor condition in May of 1863. The dies of this Harrison medal just as the obverse Henry Clay DeWitt HC-1844-4/ Satterlee-126 cut by Mitchell were obtained by New York die-sinker George Hampton Lovett who issued proof re-strikes circa 1860 in copper, silver, and white metal medal types. The example below as far as strike, proof-like surface reflectivity, and tin pest oxidation betters the finest in the John J. Ford, Jr's sale earlier Wayte Raymond obtained through the purchase of Fredrick C. C. Boyd's collection.

    To Err Is Human.... To Collect Err's Is Just Too Much Darn Tootin Fun!
  • Options
    BroadstruckBroadstruck Posts: 30,497 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited October 15, 2017 6:12AM

    Billjones, Your 1833 Andrew Jackson HTT has so many positive surface condition attributes that the hole on that variety is easily overlooked. Also your pricing is a bit dated as what normally sells for $300-400 these days is an example that was ground salvaged and environmentally damaged.

    To Err Is Human.... To Collect Err's Is Just Too Much Darn Tootin Fun!
  • Options
    ldhairldhair Posts: 7,123 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I can live with a hole with something as cool as these. Fun thread Bill.

    Larry

  • Options
    291fifth291fifth Posts: 23,942 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I think it is unfortunate that many, perhaps most of the original hanging devices have been removed from these pieces. I suspect that the removal was done by coin/medal collectors who found the complete pieces difficult to display in albums.

    All glory is fleeting.
  • Options
    BroadstruckBroadstruck Posts: 30,497 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited October 15, 2017 6:33AM

    @291fifth said:
    I think it is unfortunate that many, perhaps most of the original hanging devices have been removed from these pieces. I suspect that the removal was done by coin/medal collectors who found the complete pieces difficult to display in albums.

    What's even worse is you see tokens/medals that saw drastic damage around the hole and rim. Folks viciously yanked to removed the bin bar without using pliers to expand/release the O ring.

    To Err Is Human.... To Collect Err's Is Just Too Much Darn Tootin Fun!
  • Options
    ECHOESECHOES Posts: 2,974 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @ChangeInHistory said:
    Very neat and interesting, your posts are always good history lessons.

    +1

    ~HABE FIDUCIAM IN DOMINO III V VI / III XVI~
    POST NUBILA PHOEBUS / AFTER CLOUDS, SUN
    Love for Music / Collector of Dreck
  • Options
    BillJonesBillJones Posts: 33,484 ✭✭✭✭✭

    For political token collectors, is there a big premium when the original cloth, twine, or hanging device is attached?

    Not from what I have seen, although having been out of the market as a dealer and a collector, that might have changed. At any rate proving that it is the original suspension device could be tricky.

    I am quite sure that this 1856 Millard Fillmore piece with a pin was “manufactured” with a hanger from the 1880s and modern string to hold the two together.


    Fillmore was the American or "Know Nothing" Party candidate who ran against Democrat, Franklin Pierce, and Republican, John C. Fremont. He was a former president who had taken office from the vice presidency when Zachary Taylor died in 1850.

    One original "hanger" that does count is the shank on the 1789 Washington buttons. the pieces with the original shank are worth far more than the pieces without it. The 19th century collectors used to snap off the shank so that the piece could lay flat in their coin cabinets.

    Retired dealer and avid collector of U.S. type coins, 19th century presidential campaign medalets and selected medals. In recent years I have been working on a set of British coins - at least one coin from each king or queen who issued pieces that are collectible. I am also collecting at least one coin for each Roman emperor from Julius Caesar to ... ?
  • Options
    rickoricko Posts: 98,724 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Political pieces are certainly part of the chronology of our history.... and often give us insight into the political issues and passions of the time...... Those were as important then as the issues of today are to us. Cheers, RickO

  • Options
    BillJonesBillJones Posts: 33,484 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Here are Lincoln pieces that sum up the major issues for the Civil War quite well.

    This first one was issued after the firing on Fort Sumter.


    This second one was issued in 1864 when Lincoln was running for re-election.


    Both of these pieces are rare. If you would like to own the second one, send me a PM.

    Retired dealer and avid collector of U.S. type coins, 19th century presidential campaign medalets and selected medals. In recent years I have been working on a set of British coins - at least one coin from each king or queen who issued pieces that are collectible. I am also collecting at least one coin for each Roman emperor from Julius Caesar to ... ?
  • Options
    NysotoNysoto Posts: 3,770 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I have a few holed coins/medals, and actually don't mind them as they are historical artifacts.

    In my holed collection I have a medal by the unheralded but talented engraver Moritz Furst, and is one of two known:

    Robert Scot: Engraving Liberty - biography of US Mint's first chief engraver

Leave a Comment

BoldItalicStrikethroughOrdered listUnordered list
Emoji
Image
Align leftAlign centerAlign rightToggle HTML viewToggle full pageToggle lights
Drop image/file