lamination error coins

well have a few of these mostly nickels

image

image


image

image


image

image


image

image

Comments

  • habaracahabaraca Posts: 1,252 ✭✭✭
    only one I have imaged:

    image
  • BroadstruckBroadstruck Posts: 26,477 ✭✭✭
    1901-O $10 with the largest obverse lamination known on top and a smaller in front of Ms. Liberty's eye.

    imageimage
    To Err Is Human.... To Collect Err's Is Just Too Much Darn Tootin Fun!
  • Very common on Nickels...especially Silver war nickels from what I hear.

    Here is a cool quarter I just sold on Ebay..

    image

    image

    image
  • silverpopsilverpop Posts: 3,899 ✭✭✭
  • 1tommy1tommy Posts: 2,497 ✭✭✭
    This is my only one, a 1956 quarter and its a Type B. Enjoy imageimage
    My Registry Set.......Varieties Are The Spice Of LIFE and so Are Those who teach us what to search For.
  • CaptHenwayCaptHenway Posts: 23,452 ✭✭✭✭✭


    << <i>Very common on Nickels...especially Silver war nickels from what I hear.

    Here is a cool quarter I just sold on Ebay..

    image

    image

    image >>



    Be careful! The delamination police might confiscate that!

    delinky

    image
    Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.--Ben Franklin
  • BillJonesBillJones Posts: 23,233 ✭✭✭✭✭
    If you any of you have an accumulation of 1943 Steel cents or 1942-5 Wartime nickels you stand a good chance of finding a piece with a lamination. Laminations are fairly common on those coins, especially the nickels.
    Retired dealer and avid collector of U.S. type coins, 19th century presidential campaign medalets and selected medals.
  • image

    image

    image



    Herb
    Remember it's not how you pick your nose that matters, it's where you put the boogers.
    imageimageimage
  • OnWithTheHuntOnWithTheHunt Posts: 608 ✭✭✭
    image
    Proud recipient of the coveted "You Suck Award" (9/3/10).
  • bigolebigole Posts: 300 ✭✭
    Dumb rookie question- are laminations good things from a value perspective, or a negative?

    Is it considered a cool error, or "damaged"?

    I've got a 1918-D Buffalo with a lamination on the reverse, I'd just like to know whether to love it or hate it.

    Thanks.
  • ErrorsOnCoinsErrorsOnCoins Posts: 6,672 ✭✭✭✭
    Minor laminations are very common and don't add to the value of the coin and may distract.

    Major eye appealing lamination errors do carry a premium.
  • silverpopsilverpop Posts: 3,899 ✭✭✭
    true they add little to the coin but to me they make the coin interesting to own, despite being common they are still a neat error to own
  • bigolebigole Posts: 300 ✭✭
    Thanks, I like it, I guess at the end of the day that's what counts.

    I just have to be careful with my Dansco when I pull out the plastic insert, otherwise it "hangs" on the lamination.
  • CoinZipCoinZip Posts: 3,128 ✭✭✭
    image
  • LanceNewmanOCCLanceNewmanOCC Posts: 12,520 ✭✭✭
    .
    lamination, cracks and clashing

    image
    OT---Gen-1:1,Ex-20:3-17,Lv-11:1-47,Dt-6:5-6,Dt-14:3-21,Jsh-1:8*,Jb-28:28,Ps-111:1-113:9,Ps-111:7-8,Ps-111:10,Pv-1:7,Pv-3:5-6*,Pv-8:13,Pv-9:10,Pv-15:33,Ec-9:5,Ec-12:13*,Is-40:8,Is-49:16,Is-55:8-9,Ml-:8,
    NT---Mt-4:19,Mt-5:17-19,Mt-5:25,Mt-6:17-18,Mt-7:1-5,Mt-7:7-8,Mt-10:16,Mt-10:30-31,Mt-10:32-39,Mt-16:24-28,Mt-17:20,Mt-19:21,Mt-22:36-40,Mt-28:18-19,Mk-10:21,Lk-12:48,Lk-16:17,Jn-3:16-17,Jn-14:6,Jn-20:29,Ac-6:4*,Ac-8:22-23,Ac-9:4-5,Rm-3:19-20,Rm-6:14,Rm-6:23,Rm-9:31-32,Rm-12:1-2,1 Co-1:25-27,1 Co-1:29:31,1 Co-6:19,1 Co-7:5,1 Co-12:4-6*,1 Co-15:45-57,2 Co-4:16,2 Co-12:9-10,Ep-6:10-20,Ep-6:12,Pp-3:7-10,Pp-4:13,2 Tm-3:16-17,Ts-3:9,Hb-10:16,Hb-11:1,Hb-11:6,Hb-11:1-40*,Jm-1:12-18,Jm-5:20,1 Pt-4:8,1 Pt-5:6,1 Pt-5:8,1 Pt-1:21,1 Jn-1:8-10,Rv-3:2-3,Rv-22:20,

    download
  • Nice 21, I like!!


    Herb
    Remember it's not how you pick your nose that matters, it's where you put the boogers.
    imageimageimage
  • LochNESSLochNESS Posts: 4,754 ✭✭✭


    << <i>1901-O $10 with the largest obverse lamination known on top and a smaller in front of Ms. Liberty's eye.

    imageimage >>



    Now if I had a gold lamination error, I'd be sure to collect any pieces that flaked off / de-laminated image
    ANA LM • WBCC 429

    Amat Colligendo Focum

    Top 10FOR SALE

    image
  • nwcoastnwcoast Posts: 1,811 ✭✭✭
    Cool examples.
    Here'smy one and only. I've had it ever since I was a little kid.
    image
  • I was looking thru some minor errors and noticed that several Lincolns with laminations also seemed to have the woodgrain effect and the grain seems to go in the same direction as the lamination! I remembered this thread and I see that two of the war nickels previously shown here seem to have the same thing going on.
    Is the wood grain effect possibly from when they rolled the metal stock there were impurities and/or bubbles in the metal? Maybe this is what causes the wood grain as the metal is compressed?

    image

    image

    Now........Everything must go.

  • CaptHenwayCaptHenway Posts: 23,452 ✭✭✭✭✭
    The woodgrain effect is caused by metal ingots with small, localized concentrations of alloy (zinc and/or tin in the case of bronze) that cause areas of the bronze to appear brassy being rolled out and elongated. These concentrations are caused by the zinc and/or tin not being properly diffused into the copper base. I believe that this was caused by the mixture not being heated hot enough.

    If the alloying materials are really poorly mixed, when they get rolled out they could cause cracks in the metal that express themselves as laminations.
    Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.--Ben Franklin
  • Here's a lamination line shaped like a U on the obverse of a 1960 Type B Reverse quarter.

    image

    image

  • I forgot to mention that there are also lamination lines on the reverse of the 1960
    Type B Reverse quarter above the R in QUARTER and above the arrowheads running across
    the left wing.
Sign In or Register to comment.