1971-D Ike, RDV-006 (FEP)

BlackhawkBlackhawk Posts: 3,881 ✭✭✭
In the new issue of the Numismatist, there's an article featuring the 1971-D Ike dollar with the RDV-006 reverse (given the name "Friendly Eagle Pattern" in the article). I believe that some of those who worked on the article are forum members. I'd like to know if forum members have found any of these coins and if so in what circumstances, i.e., bulk circulated, BU rolls, etc.
"Have a nice day!"
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Comments

  • RampageRampage Posts: 9,180 ✭✭✭
    I have found some. Would like to find more, but they are hard. They will get harder when PCGS decides to attribute them. image I traded two of my coins for some smooth edged Washington Dollars some weeks ago. I've got a PCGS MS63 and a 64 setting here in front of me now.
  • BlackhawkBlackhawk Posts: 3,881 ✭✭✭
    The article would indicate that there are between 3 and 4 times as many of the 1971-D FEP Ikes as there are 1972 type 2 reverse Ikes. In your searching, have you found the FEP Ikes easier to find than the '72 type 2's?
    "Have a nice day!"
  • LanLordLanLord Posts: 12,236 ✭✭✭✭
    What is a sign of the Friendly Eagle Pattern? Bird got an arm over the moons shoulder?image

    No, really, it is a serious question.
  • GandyjaiGandyjai Posts: 1,387 ✭✭

    They are NOT easy to find....and are very tough to find in MS65 or MS66!

    Run a search for RDV-006 on this Forum to get some good pics of the Earth.

    There are some other Forum members that can give more info.........image
    DRG is the expert.

    Brian
    I LOVE image TALON HEAD, PEG LEG & ERROR IKES! image

    edited to wait on article.....image
  • My experience has been that they are scarce in high grade. Many sliders around.

    I am curious about the "Friendly Eagle" moniker. To me the RDV-006 eagle looks like a bad-ass eagle compared to the normal variety!
    I always considered the RDV-006 warlike, and the regular reverse peaceful.
    "Wars are really ugly! They're dirty
    and they're cold.
    I don't want nobody to shoot me in the foxhole."
    Mary






    Best Franklin Website


  • << <i>My experience has been that they are scarce in high grade. Many sliders around.

    I am curious about the "Friendly Eagle" moniker. To me the RDV-006 eagle looks like a bad-ass eagle compared to the normal variety!
    I always considered the RDV-006 warlike, and the regular reverse peaceful. >>



    The NUMISMATIST article should help explain "Friendly Eagle Pattern" - due out next week I think. Rob
    Modern dollars are like children - before you know it they'll be all grown up.....

    Questions about Ikes? Go to The IKE GROUP WEB SITE
  • BlackhawkBlackhawk Posts: 3,881 ✭✭✭
    I got my copy of the Numismatist yesterday. Very nice article, congratulations to those involved. image
    "Have a nice day!"
  • The "Friendly Eagle" moniker comes from the fact that this coin does not have the "Hawkish Brow Line" above the eagle's eye seen on all other Low Relief Ike's.

    There are a few other features of the FEP eagle that tend to make it more passive appearing than the regular Type 1 Low Relief design. The same Low Relief design was used on all other 1971 D Ike's (other than the FEP) and all 1971 Philadelphia Ike's as well as all 1971 S "Blue Ike's".

    It is interesting to note that all of the High Profile (Type 2 & Type 3) designs feature an eagle WITHOUT the "Hawkish Brow Line".

    The 1971 D FEP (formerly RDV-006) is the only Low Profile Eisenhower WITHOUT the "Hawkish Brow Line", making it an intermediary between the original High Relief and the secondary Low Relief designs.

    Another interesting fact is that the original Eisenhower dollar galvano (dated 1970) was High Relief and did not have the "Hawkish Brow Line". This indicates that the deep furrowed line above the eagle's eye, as well as several other features, were added to the Low Relief design (used in 1971 and most of 1972) to compensate for the loss of depth (when changing from a High Relief to a Low Relief coin). As you may know, the Mint was forced to strike the early (non proof) Ike's in Low Relief even though the original plan was to strike High Relief coins. It was not until late in 1972 that the mint came up with a way to strike business strike Ike's in High Relief.

    The well known "King of Ike's", the T2 was the first attempt at a High Relief business strike Ike. When this was successful, the Type 3 "High Relief" went into production and then starting in 1973 all Ike's were struck in high relief.

    The true significance of the FEP was overlooked in the 1999 Errorscope article. It is not just a slight variation of the basic design. It is a fully developed intermediary that retained some of the key features of the High Relief design, tested some of the elements used in the final Low Relief design and has unique features that were never used in any other die. This is why the RDV-006 is more properly given the "Pattern" designation.

    The exact mintage numbers of the FEP are unknown. While we took educated guesses in our article, it is impossible to be certain. No records could be found that indicate that the mint even knew of the existence of the FEP, let alone specific mintage numbers. Further, even though we recognized that several different dies were used in the minting of the FEP it is unknown how many coins were struck from each die or if all of the coins struck were released to circulation.

    As for the difficulty finding specimens, the FEP seems to be a bit easier to find than the famed 1972 Type 2, but not much more so. It should be realized though, that the T2 was recognized as a variety in 1972. It can be assumed that the T2 has been "Cherried" from the very beginning (to some degree). The FEP on the other hand was completely unknown until 1999 and it's true significance is only now being recognized.

    It is my belief that the FEP will turn out to be somewhat more common than the 1972 T2, with populations roughly twice as high (at the very most). PCGS MS66 examples are VERY tough to find and I have never seen a PCGS MS67 FEP....It may also turn out that the FEP is more rare than the T2, due to the factors listed above. Only time will tell.
    (PAST) OWNER #1 SBA$ REGISTRY COLLECTOIN
  • 19Lyds19Lyds Posts: 26,382 ✭✭✭
    I can hardly wait to get home to read the article as I know that those involved have done extensive research! The original Errorscope article announcing the discovery of this piece really missed a lot and the latest Coin Worlds simply repeated that information adding only references to feather patterns on the tail and wing of the Eagle.

    As far as scarcity, once everybody starts looking for these, they will get very difficult to find.

    (Look Left)



    I decided to change calling the bathroom the John and renamed it the Jim. I feel so much better saying I went to the Jim this morning.



    The name is LEE!
  • BarndogBarndog Posts: 19,832 ✭✭✭✭✭
    well-written and easily-understood article, I liked it.
  • bronze6827bronze6827 Posts: 511 ✭✭✭
    I sold one of these a while back in high grade. I knew what it was, but there just wasn't a big premium for them at the time, and I wasn't concerned about them all that much either. Looking back I wish I still had it, but don't lose any sleep over it. I'm fairly confident that when I decide to put forth a concerted effort on this variety one will be found again in time, and with patience.

    I would agree with the others that these are fairly scarce, but not quite as scarce as the type 2's. It certainly is a specific variety and in my opinion should be clutch player in any good Eisenhower variety collection.
  • 19Lyds19Lyds Posts: 26,382 ✭✭✭
    When did you sell it and did you make note of the special reverse?
    I decided to change calling the bathroom the John and renamed it the Jim. I feel so much better saying I went to the Jim this morning.



    The name is LEE!
  • bronze6827bronze6827 Posts: 511 ✭✭✭
    I sold it about a year and a half ago to another board member, and no, I did not make any special note on the coin of the reverse. It was in a PCGS MS66 holder.
  • segojasegoja Posts: 5,797 ✭✭✭
    The numbers from several sources indicate about 1 in 35-45 coins of the 1971-D are the DDR-06 version. That includes circs as well. As the 71-D is the most common high grade Ike, I do not think these will be tough to find in high grade.

    Of the 72-P type II, about 1 in 350-400 are type II's, which includes circs. This makes the type II about 10x rarer than the 71-D DDR-06.

    Just a few numbers from several folks who've looked at thousands of Ikes....and kept track!
    JMSCoins Website Link


    Ike Specialist

    Finest Toned Ike I've Ever Seen, been looking since 1986

    image
  • 19Lyds19Lyds Posts: 26,382 ✭✭✭
    I personally know of only two die varities for this specific reverse. A regular reverse and a Doubled Die reverse. During the years these were minted, I believe they were getting between 100,000 and 130,000 coins per die. I do not have the specific figures for die life as my guide is back at home. I also know that during production, if there were any observable problems with a die it was sent to the die shop and replaced asap.

    I have also gone through hundreds of 1971-D rolls, BU, UNC, and Circ and just not found that many. Since the mint has no immediately available records of this reverse, actual numbers are pure speculation unlike the Type 2 reverse of which we know was a single die.

    I have been looking for this particular reverse for more than a year now and they are not that easy to locate. Given the recent publicity, I suspect that they will be even more difficult to find now.
    I decided to change calling the bathroom the John and renamed it the Jim. I feel so much better saying I went to the Jim this morning.



    The name is LEE!
  • I have been diligently searching 1971 D Ike's for the past 4 years. While I have occasionally found a roll with several FEP's, I would estimate the numbers to be closer to 1 in 200.

    Any small sample doesn't mean much, but I have been searching for these everywhere for 4 years. At first I thought it would be easy to assemble a group of 1,000. Now I realized that at this rate it would take me 20 years...and that is if they remained as common as when I started.

    Again, the T2 was known about in 1972 when it was minted. The FEP was not recognized until 1999 and is still not actively searched for (I think that is about to change).

    The FEP does appear to be more common than the 1972 T2, and high grade 1971 D's are much more common than high grade 1972 Philly's, so I agree that the FEP in high grade is easier to find then the T2.

    The T2 will remain the King of the Ike's but the FEP is definitely the Queen.

    The other really cool thing about the FEP is that it is UNIQUE!!!

    The 1972 T2 is simply a circulation strike coin made from a die that was used to strike all of the 1971 S Proof Ike's, the 1972 S Silver Circulation strikes and the 1972 S Proof's. In other words, the T2 reverse was used to strike some 8 Million coins.

    The FEP reverse was ONLY used on a limited number of 1971 D Ike's.

    The FEP is NOT an error or even a variety. It is a PATTERN.


    (PAST) OWNER #1 SBA$ REGISTRY COLLECTOIN
  • Lately, I have come across a few AU/BU's only.

    They are a very cool coin and certainly worth searching for. The more you look at them, the more differences you begin to notice between this Pattern, and the regular issue.

    In some ways, they are kinda of like a Cheerios Sac, both being Patterns that went undiscovered as such for quite some time.
    "Wars are really ugly! They're dirty
    and they're cold.
    I don't want nobody to shoot me in the foxhole."
    Mary






    Best Franklin Website
  • 19Lyds,
    Some congrats are due to you for you being mentioned in the Numismatist article.

    Mark
    Member of LSCC, EAC, Fly-In Club
    Life member of ANA
  • Any chance of a side by side picture or a link to one?


    thanks....
  • RWBRWB Posts: 8,153
    Just to avoid confusing neophyte collectors: These are no more "pattern" coins than small motto/large motto 2-cents, 1878 8TF Morgans, 1913 Ty-1 Buffalo nickels, 1917 Ty-1 SLQs or a dozen other varieties and design variants.

    Have fun searching for, collecting and trading these interesting varieties - enjoy them for what they are not for hype.
  • 19Lyds19Lyds Posts: 26,382 ✭✭✭


    << <i>Any chance of a side by side picture or a link to one? >>



    Some of what I have:

    Craters:
    image

    The Regular Earth on the left with the FEV Earth on the Right (Focus on the Islands and the shape of the Gulf of Mexico):
    image

    This particular coin shows almost 7 distinct islands off the coast of a Florida that has a completely different shape than the regular reverse. It comes to a point and almost appears doubled. The eastern seaboard also has a distinctly different shape than on a regular reverse.

    The Eagles:
    image

    The Regular Reverse:
    image

    The FEV Reverse:
    image

    The FEV coin chosen for the above photographs is an ICG MS64 coin that has a light white patina which is very prevalent on the reverse. However, the strike of the earth is very clear.

    As I stated earlier, I have not read the article just yet but I am very eager to do so.
    I decided to change calling the bathroom the John and renamed it the Jim. I feel so much better saying I went to the Jim this morning.



    The name is LEE!
  • carlcarl Posts: 2,092
    Odd. Two posts about the same coin. Must be becoming popular.
    Carl
  • RWB: I believe that all of the varieties that you refer to were purposeful changes made by the Mint. The 1913 T1 & T2 Buffalo nickels are great examples of the Mint changing the design mid year and creating two varieties.

    The point that you are missing is that the mint did not change the Eisenhower dollar design for circulating coins between 1971 & 1972. They used the same Low Relief Type 1 die (with minor variations and errors) throughout 1971 and 1972 at both the Philadelphia and Denver mints (with the exception of changing to a High Relief design at the Philadelphia mint late in 1972....the Type 2 & 3).

    The FEP design is not a variety of the T1 design, nor was it a planned change. It is a pattern die that was NOT selected to be used to strike circulating coins.

    The lack of the furrowed brow line and the presence of very different appearing artwork for the earth and the craters on the moon make it impossible that the FEP die was altered to create the T1 die or that the T1 was altered to create the FEP.

    We have reason to believe that the FEP dies were made to be used in San Francisco, probably to strike a Low Relief CU-NI clad proof. When the CU-NI proof Ike was scrapped in 1971 a few of these dies somehow found there way to the Denver mint. Just like a few 40% Silver Ike Planchets, meant for San Francisco, were used to strike Denver Ike's, the FEP's dies ended up in Denver and were used to strike coins for circulation.

    You can make the argument that since the coins were struck for circulation that they technically are not Pattern Coins, however, the FEP dies are in fact Pattern Dies!

    Just to be clear, varieties and errors occur when the selected die is doubled in the production process, when the die is altered such as the High and Low leaf Wisconsin quarters, or when a die intended for some other use is used, such as when a proof die is used to strike coins for circulation. Varieties also occur when the Mint purposefully uses two different dies to strike coins the same year, such as the 1913 T1 & T2 Buffalo nickels.

    The accidental use of a die NOT intended to strike ANY coin for distribution, is another story all together!

    While not a unique situation, the FEP is certainly unusual and intriguing.

    Just for comparison here is another similar (but different) story, taken from collectors-society.com

    In the Spotlight: The Arlington Collection 1861-S Paquet $20 Liberty Head Gold Double Eagle
    According to An Insider's Guide to Collecting Type 1 Double Eagles by Douglas Winter and Adam Crum, the
    Arlington Collection's 1861-S double eagle would qualify as condition census, which by their definition would rank this in the top 5 of 6 examples known.

    The 1861-S Paquet reverse double eagle was once thought to have been just a pattern coin. The problem with this logic is that pattern coins were only minted in Philadelphia, not San Francisco. Also, the fact that this coin was released into circulation makes this a regular issue and not a pattern.

    The coin gets its name from its designer, Assistant Engraver Anthony C. Paquet. The most noticeable difference between the Paquet reverse and the earlier design is that the lettering on the Paquet is noticeably taller.

    But this coin should not exist. Apparently the feeling was that the coin's rim was two narrow and would cause problems. A message was sent to San Francisco telling them to halt production and revert back to the old reverse die design. Unfortunately (or fortunately for collectors), the telegraph only went as far as Missouri. By the time the message arrived in San Francisco, 19,250 coins with the Paquet reverse had already been struck and released into circulation.

    This San Francisco double eagle is very popular among collectors due to it being the only double eagle with the Paquet reverse that was released into circulation. As a result, this coin is a must have for type collectors. Because of this demand, the 1861-S Paquet reverse has a significantly higher premium attached to it than other double eagles of similar rarity and grade.

    Nevertheless, the 1861-S Paquet reverse is the rarest of all the San Francisco type 1 double eagles, just beating out the 1866-S No Motto for the title. There are no known uncirculated examples and it is a good bet that some of the totals in the NGC population count are the same coin being resubmitted multiple times. Moving up from AU55 to AU58 would increase the value of the coin by tens of thousands of dollars. Now that I look at it, I think mine deserves a grade of AU58!

    There are two Philadelphia examples of the Paquet reverse but these were never officially released into circulation. There was a feeling that the rim was too narrow and would cause problems when struck. So the Philadelphia coins were apparently melted with the exception of the two known examples. One example is graded MS67 and was once in the Norweb Collection. This coin was displayed by Monaco Financial at the September 2005 Long Beach show were I was able to snap a picture of it.

    The Norweb example is said to be worth $10,000,000 today. This coin was part of the recent Noe scandal in Ohio. Apparently this coin was part of one of the coin funds involved in the scandal. After the coin was sold from the fund, it remained listed on the fund's inventory for years afterwards.

    The other example is graded MS61 and was purchased at an auction in August 2006 in Denver by Monaco Financial for a sum of $1,600,000. I'm sure we will be seeing this coin in a future display of Monaco's. I only hope I get the chance to see it and snap a photo of it.

    The 1861-P Paquet Reverse is coin #33 in 100 Greatest U.S. Coins (2nd Ed.) by Jeff Garrett and Ron Guth.

    The 1861-S Paquet Reverse is coin #99 in 100 Greatest U.S. Coins (2nd Ed.) by Jeff Garrett and Ron Guth.


    Lee: Thanks for the photo's!!
    (PAST) OWNER #1 SBA$ REGISTRY COLLECTOIN
  • For me, the most reliable PUP for the FEP is the "thickened " area of the rim of the on the crater above the 2nd "L" in Dollar.

    See the leaf under the "FG" designers initials? Count over one leaf to the left..this second lower leaf 'points' to the thickened area.

    The second thing I look for is the eyebrow. On the regular issue the posterior end of the eyebrow ends in a single 'point'.
    On the Pattern, the eyebrow terminates in a bifurcation, or double point, that looks much like two pennant flags. This is difficult to see in the pics 19Lyds has kindly posted, but is quite apparent when you have the two coins in hand.

    BTW- The FEP that 19Lyds has imaged is possibly the most well struck example of the Pattern that I have seen.
    "Wars are really ugly! They're dirty
    and they're cold.
    I don't want nobody to shoot me in the foxhole."
    Mary






    Best Franklin Website
  • tradedollarnuttradedollarnut Posts: 18,343 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Looking at the differences in the pics, my opinion is that this just won't catch on as a major variety.
  • Judging from the prices they are bringing now ($100+ for certified MS64's), I would say the variety is already "catching".
    "Wars are really ugly! They're dirty
    and they're cold.
    I don't want nobody to shoot me in the foxhole."
    Mary






    Best Franklin Website
  • GandyjaiGandyjai Posts: 1,387 ✭✭
    Besides it's scarcity, and about everything DRG pointed out.....To me, I find the FEP "unique" and fascinating for the following:

    It represents a snapshot of history....The USA beating USSR in the race for the moon. Probably one the the largest achievements
    of mankind! For thousands of years, man has been standing on this planet looking up at the moon wondering if man would ever
    walk on the moon. The Apollo 11 of the USA accomplished this.

    The government decided to bring back the "BIG" Dollar to commemorate such a monumental accomplishment.
    This coin was to have our nation's bird, the bald eagle, not just sitting there or striking a pose,...but landing on the moon!
    The coin's designer, Frank Gasparro relished this opportunity and considers the Ike Dollar his most prized and distinguished work.

    In his original Ike 1970 galvanos (displayed at the Eisenhower museum in Abilene , Kansas). He purposely made the eagle's
    face with a heavy "furrowed" brow that gave the eagle a more agressive "don't mess with me" look.
    Mint Director Mary brooks told Frank that the eagle was "too fierce, too warlike, a little to aggressive"...Exactly how Frank THOUGHT it
    should look!.....But, one has to remember the timing of this coin....it was at a time when the USA and USSR were in a cold war with lots of nuclear bombs! The LAST thing the US Government wanted to do, was present a "fierce, warlike" appearance on their newest BIG Dollar.

    The FEP is the first example we see of Frank's "make it friendlier" modifications. Yet,....there were many other differences on this
    coin as well, that just aren't found anywhere else in the whole Ike series! Designs that are more "proofish" than "business-strikish"....such
    as more defined lunar details, eagle feathers and the raised and rounded Earth that stands out so well with that proof frosting coating.

    A more accurate Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean islands are also "unique" to the series and never seen again. These also give a collector
    enough of a deviation, that the FEP can be spotted with the naked eye once they know what to look for. Naked-Eye varieties are much
    friendlier on collector's eyes than having to squint into a loop or microscope to tell what something is.

    These "proofish" design element modifications and the fact that it was this coin was minted in Denver (without the knowledge of
    the people running the presses) and not Philly are two of main reasons that this we believe the FEP die was intended to be used
    on a 1971 Proof Clad that never materialized, so the dies just got "recycled" at the Denver mint.

    I guess I find the FEP's most "unique" aspect is that some of these changes and modifications from Frank's original design were done
    not to improve the look or for artistic purposes, like most other coin design changes. They were done for purely political reasons regarding
    the Cold War nuclear standoff between the USA and the Soviets............A snapshot of history!

    Happy Hunting!
    Brian

    I Love image FEP's, Variety & Error Ikes! image
  • My two cents on the FEP's Pop: without boring you all with the math, it's pop is .5 million within a factor of two based on the total number of FEP's our "Ike Group" has found searching hard through circ. bags/bins, rolls, every 1971-D listed on the bay, TT and DLC, and so on and so on and so on.

    Our group's experience I suspect is without peer. The FEP has been our obsession. Our total exposure to 1971-D Ikes is in the hundreds of thousands from all across the country.

    Different experiences finding the FEP are mostly a function of geography. Certain regions of the country have more, most have les, some far less.

    This is not to say that our population projection is correct but at present we bring a wealth of experience and broad perspective to the table.

    By the way, take it to the bank that the pop of the FEP and the '72 T2 are comparable. More on that later.... Rob Ezerman
    Modern dollars are like children - before you know it they'll be all grown up.....

    Questions about Ikes? Go to The IKE GROUP WEB SITE


  • << <i>... every 1971-D listed on the bay, TT and DLC, and so on and so on and so on. >>



    That must be some heckuva high resolution monitor you are using! image
    "Wars are really ugly! They're dirty
    and they're cold.
    I don't want nobody to shoot me in the foxhole."
    Mary






    Best Franklin Website


  • << <i>

    << <i>... every 1971-D listed on the bay, TT and DLC, and so on and so on and so on. >>



    That must be some heckuva high resolution monitor you are using! image >>



    Ding-dang-it my monitor doesn't sharpen the typically wonderful ebay images (wish it did, LOL!).

    But there are several FEP specifics that sometimes can be deciphered even with lousy pictures. If even one is present one has reasonable prospects to cherry.

    It took much time and effort for our group to compile our tip-offs so I'll just say we're going to sit on them for a while to stay ahead in the game. Most of the keys are in the article but it takes a while "see" them on weak images. And, yes, we have all bought our share of common 71-D's to say the least! Rob

    Modern dollars are like children - before you know it they'll be all grown up.....

    Questions about Ikes? Go to The IKE GROUP WEB SITE


  • << <i>For me, the most reliable PUP for the FEP is the "thickened " area of the rim of the on the crater above the 2nd "L" in Dollar.

    See the leaf under the "FG" designers initials? Count over one leaf to the left..this second lower leaf 'points' to the thickened area.

    The second thing I look for is the eyebrow. On the regular issue the posterior end of the eyebrow ends in a single 'point'.
    On the Pattern, the eyebrow terminates in a bifurcation, or double point, that looks much like two pennant flags. This is difficult to see in the pics 19Lyds has kindly posted, but is quite apparent when you have the two coins in hand.

    BTW- The FEP that 19Lyds has imaged is possibly the most well struck example of the Pattern that I have seen. >>



    Bushmaster8, love your observations and our Ike Group (by the way all but one are Forum members) certainly hasn't a lock on what will work for every person let alone what will evolve in the years to come about the FEP; but, and it's a big but, our article is a distillation of 10 or 15 man-years of pretty intense, almost obsessive observation and study of this Ike so the highlights we point out have come out of a whole lot of lookin'image

    It is a radically different Ike reverse and it took me almost half a year to really digest the darn thing so I could work with the details and cherry with some success.

    I'm "exspurting" here on human perceptual psychology: we are primed to see what we want to see, what we expect to see and what we have been trained to see. To break from such molding is never easy and the FEP is a perfect example.... Rob
    Modern dollars are like children - before you know it they'll be all grown up.....

    Questions about Ikes? Go to The IKE GROUP WEB SITE
  • 19Lyds19Lyds Posts: 26,382 ✭✭✭
    Ditto what Rob said above!

    After reading about the FEV on these boards I happened across two NGC Versions at a local coin show! An MS65 and an MS66. I had the darndest time figuring out if it was the coin being referenced in the thread with the descriptions given! I responded to a request for an RDV on the BST board with the option that the buyer could return it if it wasn't the FEV.

    Since that day I have studied these coins diligently and can now pick these out from even the worst of pictures just by looking for the right clues. Once you zero in on those, this becomes an eye readable coin!

    BTW, picked 2 up this afternoon. A 62 and a 63 for $2.75 each!
    I decided to change calling the bathroom the John and renamed it the Jim. I feel so much better saying I went to the Jim this morning.



    The name is LEE!
  • GRANDAMGRANDAM Posts: 6,186 ✭✭✭✭✭
    From my experiences I also agree that the FEP AKA RDV-006 is a difficult coin to locate in any grade. And as Rob stated above I believe that they are easier to find in certain parts of the country than others. In the area I live in I have had a VERY difficult time finding them in any condition.

    I believe this to be true with 1971-S "PEG LEG" as well as I have had a much easier time locating them while others can't seem to find them no matter how hard they look!

    I have looked at thousands of 1971-D coins in rolls and singles and have found somewhere in the ratio of 1 in 300. I have a few high grade examples but they were purchased rather than found raw.

    I agree that the 1972-P Ty 2 is still "THE KING" of IKE'S and will always remain so but I believe the 1971-D FEP will soon become the #2 coin and then followed by the 1971-S Silver "PEG LEG"

    JMHO, GrandAm image
    GrandAm :)
  • GandyjaiGandyjai Posts: 1,387 ✭✭
    <<I have looked at thousands of 1971-D coins in rolls and singles and have found somewhere in the ratio of 1 in 300.>>

    Better than I do down here in Florida!....Here, it's about 1 in 1,000 for the bags of circs I go through!image
    The Philly Mint provided the Ikes for Florida. Most of the raw FEP's that came here were in tourists pockets or with
    retirees when they settled in.

    It's much easier for me to find them in dealer's inventories of slabbed Ikes or going through boxes of 2x2's.

    Brian

    I Love image FEP's, Variety & Error Ikes! image
  • TDN; You state that "Looking at the differences in the pics, my opinion is that this just won't catch on as a major variety". I respect what you think but I am positive that you are wrong about the FEP.

    In the other thread about the FEP DHeath posted a photo of a FEP that he found in his collection. He was previously unaware of this variety and said that he searched his coins and found the photographed coin after reading the article.

    When I asked him how difficult it was to recognize the FEP here is his reply, "Once I spent a few minutes with the article learning the markers, I don't think I'll ever miss one. Great pics, BTW. IMO, they're easy to see, easier than the 72 varieties, and I routinely look for them.

    As I posted in the other thread.

    I think the FEP is the most easily recognized reverse Ike design. The big round Gulf of Mexico is one of the easiest features to pick out.

    The 1972 T2 may have a lower mintage and be more difficult to find in MS65+ grades, but the fact remains, the FEP design was used to strike a TOTAL of about 500,000 coins. The Type 2 die was used to strike over 8 million!!

    Given that the FEP design is easy to recognize with the naked eye and has the lowest TOTAL mintage, along with its mysterious history (pattern? variety?, meant to strike a low profile proof?) , I say;

    The King is Dead!!

    Long live the KING!!!
    (PAST) OWNER #1 SBA$ REGISTRY COLLECTOIN
  • I thought I would bring this thread back and see what new is happening.

    Are people looking for these?

    Are you finding them?
    (PAST) OWNER #1 SBA$ REGISTRY COLLECTOIN
  • I didn't find any on the floor at the Springfield, IL show last weekend.image
    "Wars are really ugly! They're dirty
    and they're cold.
    I don't want nobody to shoot me in the foxhole."
    Mary






    Best Franklin Website
  • massscrewmassscrew Posts: 1,965 ✭✭✭
    Crappy pics, but can anyone tell if this is an FEP?

    image

    image
  • Sorry Masscrew, no cigar for you. Keep looking!
    "Wars are really ugly! They're dirty
    and they're cold.
    I don't want nobody to shoot me in the foxhole."
    Mary






    Best Franklin Website
  • 19Lyds19Lyds Posts: 26,382 ✭✭✭
    Ditto Kiddo!

    You photo shows three distinct Islands off the coast of Florida.

    Look for this:

    image
    I decided to change calling the bathroom the John and renamed it the Jim. I feel so much better saying I went to the Jim this morning.



    The name is LEE!
  • massscrewmassscrew Posts: 1,965 ✭✭✭
    Ah, I see.

    It would have been lucky as it's the 66 in my registry set.

    Thanks!
  • fivecentsfivecents Posts: 10,487 ✭✭✭✭
    I just found 9 FEV RDV-006 Ikes in a BU roll of 1971-D Ikes!

    Will PCGS ever label this variety???
    Hey homey.....Watch out for those PCGS Rattlers and "NO LINE" NGC Fatties.

    "Eye appeal adds a little and forgives alot".
  • 19Lyds19Lyds Posts: 26,382 ✭✭✭
    Super FIND!

    Do post some pictures when you can!

    As for PCGS, eventually, yes they will. It may take the next issue of the Cherry Pickers Guide before it happens but they will do it!

    I actually find this very frustrating in that this is not a microscopic variety. It's an in your face "why the hell didn't I see that before" type of variety!
    I decided to change calling the bathroom the John and renamed it the Jim. I feel so much better saying I went to the Jim this morning.



    The name is LEE!
  • Great thread! I find that the hardest FEP(RDV-006) to cherry is the one with the DDO, I've only found (1). I started looking for the RDV-006 in the Fall of 1995 or was it 1996, after reading a "back page" article in Coin World.
    John G Bradley II
  • fivecentsfivecents Posts: 10,487 ✭✭✭✭
    Thanks 19Lyds!



    << <i>Great thread! I find that the hardest FEP(RDV-006) to cherry is the one with the DDO, I've only found (1). >>

    What is the PUP on the DDO?? Thanks in advance.
    Hey homey.....Watch out for those PCGS Rattlers and "NO LINE" NGC Fatties.

    "Eye appeal adds a little and forgives alot".
  • 19Lyds19Lyds Posts: 26,382 ✭✭✭
    The Motto is where I check first:

    image

    The Liberty, specifically the R and T:

    image

    I decided to change calling the bathroom the John and renamed it the Jim. I feel so much better saying I went to the Jim this morning.



    The name is LEE!
  • Good pics Lee, Wexler had your variety as DDO-1; I guess that he didn't look very hard at the rev?? If yours is an example of the only(?) DDO/RDV-006 what is this? Piece has no doubling on RT(Lib), that I can see, and is less prominent on IGWT, check the notches N, G, T, R & S; piece is MDS.
    image
    John G Bradley II
  • baddogssbaddogss Posts: 1,021 ✭✭✭
    I just started a set of these and I'm in the process of reading the book 'Authoritative Reference Eisenhower Ike Dollars 2nd Ed. ", so thanks for bring this thread back to life.
    Thank you PCGS for the Forums! ANA # 3150931 - Successful BST with: Bah1513, coin22lover, coinsarefun, DCW, guitarwes, SLQ, Sunshine Rare Coin, tmot99, Tdec1000, dmarks, wondercoin
    Sugar magnolia blossoms blooming, heads all empty and I don't care ...
  • What would be a fair price for a MS 63 or 64, let alone a 65 for these.

    Cameron Kiefer
    Kiefer Numismatics

    303-570-1897

    NGC Authorized Dealer
    CAC Submission Center
  • www.ikegroup.org has a comprehensive Ike price list (registration required). It is probably the most accurate and up-to-date list for Ike varieties.

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