Home U.S. Coin Forum

Name a Coin that doesn't get enough love

braddickbraddick Posts: 22,846 ✭✭✭✭✭

For me it is the small date 1970-S business strike cent. A scarce variety that is often overlooked yet I think shouldn't be.

What is a coin you think is overlooked and underrated?

peacockcoins

«1

Comments

  • braddickbraddick Posts: 22,846 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @gumby1234 said:
    The 1982 NO P dime absolutely gets no love.

    The No 'P' Washington quarter gets no attention or love either.
    Remember when they were first discovered? There would be full page ads
    in Coin World marketing these as investments.


    peacockcoins

  • DeplorableDanDeplorableDan Posts: 2,476 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @WCC said:
    Territorial gold $10s and 20s.

    I know these coins aren't cheap but find it a lot more interesting than Liberty Head 10s or 20s.

    <3

  • gumby1234gumby1234 Posts: 5,362 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @braddick The difference between the 82 no P and the no P quarter is that the dime is the only US coin struck for circulation that had the mintmark omitted from the die. The quarter is just overpolished.

    Successful BST with ad4400, Kccoin, lablover, pointfivezero, koynekwest, jwitten, coin22lover, HalfDimeDude, erwindoc, jyzskowsi, COINS MAKE CENTS, AlanSki, BryceM

  • gumby1234gumby1234 Posts: 5,362 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @gumby1234 said:
    The 1982 NO P dime absolutely gets no love.

    Well maybe a little love because I love them.

    Successful BST with ad4400, Kccoin, lablover, pointfivezero, koynekwest, jwitten, coin22lover, HalfDimeDude, erwindoc, jyzskowsi, COINS MAKE CENTS, AlanSki, BryceM

  • WCCWCC Posts: 2,340 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @PerryHall said:

    @WCC said:
    Territorial gold $10s and 20s.

    I know these coins aren't cheap but find it a lot more interesting than Liberty Head 10s or 20s.

    California Fractional Gold coins get even less love.

    It's a large specialty with a widely differing preference between the individual coins and the small size explains much of it. My internet search claims about 590 varieties in the BG reference guide while the front page of my Heritage search identifies one coin as BG-1072. I don't own this guide or know how distinctive these are vs. another series, but it's not a small number.

  • WCCWCC Posts: 2,340 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Eldorado9 said:
    I'd say as a series, the 3 cent nickels don't get much attention.

    It's due to the coin attributes. 3CN is a small base metal coin with a design most collectors don't find particularly appealing. A few legitimately scarce dates (1884 and 1885 to my recollection) but these coins are nowhere near cheap, just cheaper than practically all other (roughly) comparably scarce US federal coinage.

    That's what explains most of it for the vast majority of examples anyone is going to give. In the example I gave (Territorial $10s and $20s), it's not a federal coin. If these were included in type sets like the 1879 stella (which is actually a pattern), it would be a lot more expensive.

  • WCCWCC Posts: 2,340 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited December 22, 2023 11:33AM

    @gumby1234 said:

    The 1982 NO P dime absolutely gets no love.

    Well maybe a little love because I love them.

    It's a die variety and a common one. I'd rate it as one of the most overpriced coins in the world for its availability and relative collectible attributes. It's similar to the most widely collected common 20th century key dates which is my explanation for its current perception.

  • SmudgeSmudge Posts: 9,163 ✭✭✭✭✭

    1846 small date half eagle.

  • hchcoinhchcoin Posts: 4,825 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Two Cent Piece. I love the design.

  • No HeadlightsNo Headlights Posts: 2,027 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @DennisH said:
    1921-P Morgans

    Also 1881-S Morgans. More common than dirt!

  • WCCWCC Posts: 2,340 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @BillJones said:

    @WCC said:
    Territorial gold $10s and 20s.

    I know these coins aren't cheap but find it a lot more interesting than Liberty Head 10s or 20s.

    Sorry, but those coins are way too expensive. I saw a couple of them when I was dealer that I really liked, but my financial comments were different in those days. When I had the funds, after I retired, I considered buying a $50 gold slug, which I know you didn't mention. The grading really put me off. I guess major rim bumps and nicks are not problem. :o

    $10s and $20s are a lot cheaper (though also more common) than the $50 slug. I agree the latter coin is not "overlooked".

    Here is a recent sale of an example which I consider a quality coin for a decent price, relative to what else can be bought from US coinage for the same money.

    https://coins.ha.com/itm/territorial-gold/1853-20-assay-office-twenty-dollar-900-thous-au55-pcgs-k-18-r2-pcgs-10013-/a/1359-5552.s?ic4=ListView-ShortDescription-071515

  • FrazFraz Posts: 1,551 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited December 22, 2023 3:10PM

    The 1979 P Susan B. Anthony dollar wide rim beats all of them.

  • c0injunkyc0injunky Posts: 50 ✭✭✭

    Jefferson nickel, with enough time, patience and a little luck you can still find every date in circulation.

  • gumby1234gumby1234 Posts: 5,362 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @DennisH said:
    1921-P Morgans

    The design changes to the 1921 Morgans make it less desirable. I personally have never liked them. I like Morgan dollars thou.

    Successful BST with ad4400, Kccoin, lablover, pointfivezero, koynekwest, jwitten, coin22lover, HalfDimeDude, erwindoc, jyzskowsi, COINS MAKE CENTS, AlanSki, BryceM

  • Russell12Russell12 Posts: 192 ✭✭✭✭

    This

  • BoosibriBoosibri Posts: 11,821 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Liberty quarter eagles from the 1840’s

  • ProofCollectionProofCollection Posts: 5,253 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The Cheerios Sacagawea dollar.

  • BarberianBarberian Posts: 2,895 ✭✭✭✭✭

    3 rim nicks away from Good
  • OAKSTAROAKSTAR Posts: 5,472 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited December 22, 2023 5:29PM

    @braddick said:
    ^
    I admitedly didn't even know that variety existed.

    And I bet we're all doubling checking our albums, right about now. I just did! 😉

    Disclaimer: I'm not a dealer, trader, grader, investor or professional numismatist. I'm just a hobbyist. (To protect me but mostly you! 🤣 )

  • cladkingcladking Posts: 28,239 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @WCC said:

    @gumby1234 said:

    The 1982 NO P dime absolutely gets no love.

    Well maybe a little love because I love them.

    It's a die variety and a common one. I'd rate it as one of the most overpriced coins in the world for its availability and relative collectible attributes. It's similar to the most widely collected common 20th century key dates which is my explanation for its current perception.

    It's far scarcer than the '16-D dime.

    Tempus fugit.
  • cladkingcladking Posts: 28,239 ✭✭✭✭✭

    And I don't think of it so much as a "die" variety as an "unintentional type coin". It is the only post-'79 dime without a mint mark.

    Tempus fugit.
  • lermishlermish Posts: 1,767 ✭✭✭✭✭

    There are lots of interesting trade dollar varieties. But without geeking out too much, there are two that should be popular but I don't see discussed that much.

    The 76-S DDO is probably not very popular/widely discussed because there are so few known it's not really collectible, just a holy grail type of coin.

    However, the 76-CC DDR is only somewhat scarce and has a huge doubled die that is easily visible to the naked eye. I don't see it mentioned very often but it seems to hit a lot of checkpoints that should make it popular.

    (Not my coin, just a TV and info from Coinfacts)


  • braddickbraddick Posts: 22,846 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @OAKSTAR said:

    @braddick said:
    ^
    I admitedly didn't even know that variety existed.

    And I bet we're all doubling checking our albums, right about now. I just did! 😉

    Or quickly checking eBay to potentially cherry-pick!

    peacockcoins

  • OwnerofawheatiehordeOwnerofawheatiehorde Posts: 1,455 ✭✭✭✭✭

    EmeraldATV’s coins. ;)

    Type collector, mainly into Seated. Young Numismatist. Good BST transactions with: mirabela, OKCC, MICHAELDIXON

  • AtcarrollAtcarroll Posts: 329 ✭✭✭
    edited December 22, 2023 7:58PM

    @Eldorado9 said:
    I'd say as a series, the 3 cent nickels don't get much attention.

    They don't, and they're so interesting. The die cracks ,worn die strikes and later soft strikes illustrate the learning curve at the mint regarding the cupronickel alloy, and hint at the attempts to resolve one of the hardness issues by playing with die spacing, a technique that would be tried later at the new Orleans mint with Morgan dollars.

    Edit for misspelling.

  • WCCWCC Posts: 2,340 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited December 22, 2023 8:00PM

    @cladking said:

    @WCC said:

    @gumby1234 said:

    The 1982 NO P dime absolutely gets no love.

    Well maybe a little love because I love them.

    It's a die variety and a common one. I'd rate it as one of the most overpriced coins in the world for its availability and relative collectible attributes. It's similar to the most widely collected common 20th century key dates which is my explanation for its current perception.

    It's far scarcer than the '16-D dime.

    I doubt it, but even if so, you're making an irrelevant comparison. Typical of those you make regularly. Comparing a die variety (82-P NM dime) to a generic date/MM combination. It's not even close to scarce. It's an R-1 with 1250+ MS just in the current TPG data, by a multiple. Anyone can buy this coin in better MS in multiple any day of the week.

    It's also from the pre-1999 (SQ) series which almost certainly ranks dead last in collector preference, as evidenced by the Heritage data.

  • WCCWCC Posts: 2,340 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @cladking said:
    And I don't think of it so much as a "die" variety as an "unintentional type coin". It is the only post-'79 dime without a mint mark.

    How many collectors really care about that, other than you? Why would type set collectors want to pay the current price to buy a duplicate type of a coin they can buy as a "BU' for 50c or less?

  • AtcarrollAtcarroll Posts: 329 ✭✭✭

    @gumby1234 said:

    @DennisH said:
    1921-P Morgans

    The design changes to the 1921 Morgans make it less desirable. I personally have never liked them. I like Morgan dollars thou.

    That, and the tens of millions minted that made them so common they were basically bullion for a long time. They're starting to gain some respect now, due to passing of their hundredth anniversary and the rising price of silver since the early 2000s, but it's a gradual gain. They were an interesting addendum to the series, not as interesting as the aborted 64d peace dollar, but interesting nonetheless.

  • cladkingcladking Posts: 28,239 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @WCC said:

    @cladking said:
    And I don't think of it so much as a "die" variety as an "unintentional type coin". It is the only post-'79 dime without a mint mark.

    How many collectors really care about that, other than you? Why would type set collectors want to pay the current price to buy a duplicate type of a coin they can buy as a "BU' for 50c or less?

    So why do you think people collect coins?

    Tempus fugit.
  • AtcarrollAtcarroll Posts: 329 ✭✭✭

    @cladking said:

    @WCC said:

    @cladking said:
    And I don't think of it so much as a "die" variety as an "unintentional type coin". It is the only post-'79 dime without a mint mark.

    How many collectors really care about that, other than you? Why would type set collectors want to pay the current price to buy a duplicate type of a coin they can buy as a "BU' for 50c or less?

    So why do you think people collect coins?

    That question could be the topic of a very long thread.

  • cladkingcladking Posts: 28,239 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Atcarroll said:

    @cladking said:

    @WCC said:

    @cladking said:
    And I don't think of it so much as a "die" variety as an "unintentional type coin". It is the only post-'79 dime without a mint mark.

    How many collectors really care about that, other than you? Why would type set collectors want to pay the current price to buy a duplicate type of a coin they can buy as a "BU' for 50c or less?

    So why do you think people collect coins?

    That question could be the topic of a very long thread.

    A thread could go on forever and ever because we are each unique.

    But the short answer is that every coin is unique as well. If every coins were a '16-D dime nobody would collect. But they're all different with different amounts of wear and of different origins and types, different compositions, mints, ages, and desirability.

    If you want to have the last US dime made by a die with no mint mark it will be an '82-NMM. If you don't want one you can acquire a '16-D or anything else you desire.

    Tempus fugit.
  • DCWDCW Posts: 6,887 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I'd say the 1970-s doubled die cent is inexplicably not given enough prestige amongst variety collectors. It is nearly as strong as the 1969-s ddo, and probably just as rare. But there is a cool story about the 1969 issue from San Francisco which involves confiscation by the secret service, and it is many times the price of the 1970.

    Dead Cat Waltz Exonumia
    "Coin collecting for outcasts..."

  • lkeneficlkenefic Posts: 7,623 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Middle Date Large Cents... 1816 to 1839

    The earlier Draped Bust series gets the most love. Ms. Liberty depicted with long flowing hair and a carefree whimsical look... the Middle Dates depict Ms. Liberty as the matured aunt that pinches your cheeks and tells you how much you've grown since the last time she saw you... ;)

    Collecting: Dansco 7070; Middle Date Large Cents (VF-AU); Box of 20;

    Successful BST transactions with: SilverEagles92; Ahrensdad; Smitty; GregHansen; Lablade; Mercury10c; copperflopper; whatsup; KISHU1; scrapman1077, crispy, canadanz, smallchange, robkool, Mission16, ranshdow, ibzman350, Fallguy, Collectorcoins, SurfinxHI, jwitten, Walkerguy21D, dsessom.
  • SmudgeSmudge Posts: 9,163 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Boosibri said:
    Liberty quarter eagles from the 1840’s

    Amen.

  • Coin FinderCoin Finder Posts: 6,930 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I think the proof 1960 Small date over large date Lincoln cent falls into this category.

Leave a Comment

BoldItalicStrikethroughOrdered listUnordered list
Emoji
Image
Align leftAlign centerAlign rightToggle HTML viewToggle full pageToggle lights
Drop image/file