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Coin imaging questions

I have been using my new camera. It has so many setting its really confusing.
I took a few random shots last night.
Are these looking any better?
I know it's possible to make a 65 coin look like a 67 if you manipulate light or the coin. How do you get a good honest shot without making the coin look bad?
In other words a good honest representation of the coin.
Feel free to offer some tips!



Comments

  • d9lowed9lowe Posts: 304 ✭✭✭✭

    Im not a photographer, but I think it has alot to do with lighting!

  • gumby1234gumby1234 Posts: 5,425 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The pics of the coin that you aren't holding look decent. Only you know if thats what it looks like thou.

    Successful BST with ad4400, Kccoin, lablover, pointfivezero, koynekwest, jwitten, coin22lover, HalfDimeDude, erwindoc, jyzskowsi, COINS MAKE CENTS, AlanSki, BryceM

  • rickoricko Posts: 98,724 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Coin pictures depend heavily on lighting. You can have good pictures, but not represent the coin in hand. Only you can determine the accuracy of the picture. Cheers, RickO

  • I believe these images to be 100% accurate.
    The coin in hand was taken to bring out the die polish lines.

  • coastaljerseyguycoastaljerseyguy Posts: 1,243 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Not bad, the 79S obverse has too much glare from light, The rest look pretty decent and very clear. I like to photo with some background present so I, and others, can tell that the color is not off nor played with. That is why I photo coins in my Dansco or LOC albums so you can tell the photos represent how coin looks in hand. Your fingers look right , assuming the countertop or whatever the others are on also matches.

  • There you go!
    I'll seek it out thank you

  • This coin is borderline PL.
    You can see my finger reflection on the obverse.
    Again trying to find accuracy with images.
    That book probably has the answers to all of my questions.
    It's worth grading to see if it makes PL.

  • BTW those aren't scratches on the obverse. They are polishing lines. I matched them up with some TV's.

  • I have one of those lights.
    I like the way you lined up the cartwheel also.
    I have a few beautiful DMPL's I am working on imaging. I have a Cannon Rebel with a macro lens. It's just going to take some time. I'll work on the black background.

  • FlyingAlFlyingAl Posts: 2,845 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Use a tripod, and two lamps. Handholding won't get good pictures.

    Young Numismatist, Coin Photographer.

  • ChrisH821ChrisH821 Posts: 6,320 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Sounds like you and I have the same set up, or nearly the same. I have a Rebel T6 and Tamron macro lens.
    I use a tripod that straddles the corner of my desk and usually two lights with tissue paper diffusing them at roughly 10 and 2.
    Do you their software that allows remote shooting? It is a must, you can preview and make adjustments before taking a photo, take the photo, see if you like it or adjust further.

    Collector, occasional seller

  • jesbrokenjesbroken Posts: 9,251 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I had two electric OTT lites that I never liked and gave them to my sister. Stupid me bought two more cordless OTT lites and still have never gotten a single coin photo that compared to incandescent. Of course, I am not a photographer by any means. Just an average skill shooter. I have had Mark's book since it came out, but I'm just not a smart photographically skilled person. I have the Camera without the ability to use it. I bought a very expensive macro lens from Japan which after I couldn't get it to work found it had a missing switch on the side of the lens. Lost out on that one.
    @Watchtower I wish you the best of luck.
    Jim


    When a man who is honestly mistaken hears the truth, he will either quit being mistaken or cease to be honest....Abraham Lincoln

    Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it.....Mark Twain
  • @FlyingAl said:
    Use a tripod, and two lamps. Handholding won't get good pictures.

    I don't disagree with you. I think using a tripod and two lamps are the way to go.
    I only hold a coin when I am trying to hit a certain angle to flash out something like polish lines.
    I never expected them to be high quality. It's the only technique I know of right now to accomplish that.

  • TomBTomB Posts: 20,724 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @robec has given you good information and he is a great photographer.

    Thomas Bush Numismatics & Numismatic Photography

    In honor of the memory of Cpl. Michael E. Thompson

    image
  • jesbrokenjesbroken Posts: 9,251 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I agree in regards to the copy stand. Mine is 15 years old, bought it from someone on the forum. It's not an expensive one, but works as needed. Positioning of the lights is obviously key to the results you are looking for.
    Jim


    When a man who is honestly mistaken hears the truth, he will either quit being mistaken or cease to be honest....Abraham Lincoln

    Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it.....Mark Twain
  • logger7logger7 Posts: 8,069 ✭✭✭✭✭

    It seems that the standards and expectations have gone up considerably in the last 20 years. I know a dealer who does many tens of thousands in business a month and upgraded for around $1500. I generally can get a good idea of what I am looking at, some find the professional TV images to be "too good". But I have an overactive imagination. Many do quite well with a smartphone. My Sony with a supermacro given me by a friend is good enough for my needs but I need to work on lighting. Someone said that going outside on a cloudy day offers good lighting.

  • The_Dinosaur_ManThe_Dinosaur_Man Posts: 836 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The more professional your set-up, the more potential for professional results. Invest in a copy stand and keep tinkering away until you find a method that gets you the desired results. And then tinker some more.

    Custom album maker and numismatic photographer, see my portfolio here: (http://www.donahuenumismatics.com/).

  • CrackoutCrackout Posts: 1,365 ✭✭✭✭✭

    A copy stand or tripod allows you set a 10 second timer on the camera so when the picture is taken there is no movement. Same thing with setting the coin on a surface rather than trying to hold it in your hand. Any little movement will make the picture blur.

  • robecrobec Posts: 6,603 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @TomB said:
    @robec has given you good information and he is a great photographer.

    High praise coming from you @TomB. Thank you.

  • ProofCollectionProofCollection Posts: 5,381 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Also see my recent thread where I got some great feedback as well. https://forums.collectors.com/discussion/1089388/coin-photography-question#latest

    I can see how the use of the floodlight is very helpful. A light box has also resulted in some decent pictures but not always. Amazon item B08PDP3YSP is what I have.

  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0
    edited April 12, 2023 6:03PM

    I am first going to need to find out what a copy stand is because I have never heard of one. It sounds like a good thing to have for coin photography which is something I do enjoy.
    I have been playing around tonight.
    I am going to post some images of more recent Morgan images. They may not be the best of the best but they are mine!
    I'm going to post a slew of images under this thread for the fun of it. This is a part of my collection I haven't shared before.
    As we learn about these beauties we start to understand what we like about them.

  • MFeldMFeld Posts: 12,020 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Watchtower said:
    I am first going to need to find out what a copy stand is because I have never heard of one. It sounds like a good thing to have for coin photography which is something I do enjoy.
    I have been playing around tonight.
    I am going to post some images of more recent Morgan images. They may not be the best of the best but they are mine!
    I'm going to post a slew of images under this thread for the fun of it. This is a part of my collection I haven't shared before.
    As we learn about these beauties we start to understand what we like about them.

    I don’t know what the coin looks like, but those images look like a big improvement over most of your others I’ve seen. 👍

    Mark Feld* of Heritage Auctions*Unless otherwise noted, my posts here represent my personal opinions.

  • ProofCollectionProofCollection Posts: 5,381 ✭✭✭✭✭

    You can get a copy stand but if you have a remote shoot setup (control your camera with your computer), you can use an articulating arm, like this one on Amazon for $30. PN: B09Y24B3X9

  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0
    edited April 12, 2023 6:23PM

    This is a beautiful 1889!

  • slider23slider23 Posts: 638 ✭✭✭✭

    The 1900 and 1889 are out of focus. Look at your reverse on the 1879 s as the focus is incredibly sharp.

  • Thanks for pointing that out. I must have changed a setting. I'll look it over.

  • robecrobec Posts: 6,603 ✭✭✭✭✭

    This is a copy stand. It lowers and raises the camera/lens to accommodate small and large coins.


  • I found it. I use auto focus. I had turned it off.
    These zero right in. Almost more than you really want to see.

  • ProofCollectionProofCollection Posts: 5,381 ✭✭✭✭✭

    That looks good. Now it's just a matter of getting the light right so you can eliminate that glare. That's the part I really struggle with.

  • coinbufcoinbuf Posts: 10,752 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited April 12, 2023 6:46PM

    @Watchtower said:
    There you go!
    I'll seek it out thank you

    Mark's book can be difficult to find and it is both pricy and somewhat outdated. Not that the information is poor or not a good investment resource, but you can find some of the information in his book for free.

    https://coinimaging.com/photography.html

    I consider Mark's skills the gold standard and have contracted with him to take most of the photos of my collection. Here are two of my coins photographed by Mark. TomB and Robec are on the same level of photography skills as Mark.


    My Lincoln Registry
    My Collection of Old Holders

    Never a slave to one plastic brand will I ever be.
  • ProofCollectionProofCollection Posts: 5,381 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @coinbuf said:

    @Watchtower said:
    There you go!
    I'll seek it out thank you

    Mark's book can be difficult to find and it is both pricy and somewhat outdated. Not that the information is poor or not a good investment resource, but you can find some of the information in his book for free.

    https://coinimaging.com/photography.html

    Thank you! This is the kind of guide I've been looking for.

  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0
    edited April 12, 2023 7:56PM

    I have a 50MP phone. I can take images that show more than you need to see. It's like a microscope. It can make a good coin look terrible.
    This is an example.
    I am not saying it's a top gem but it's to strong.



  • Those copy stands are for the very serious photographer. I'll keep an eye out for one but I an not sure I am ready to go in that deep.
    Is this what PCGS and the auction houses use?

  • in2Coinsin2Coins Posts: 239 ✭✭✭✭
    edited April 12, 2023 8:26PM

    Half of your coin is out of focus. That’s because your camera is not square or completely perpendicular to the coin you’re shooting. Given that you’re using a Tripod, your camera is drooping. Buy one of the below bubble level to level your camera until you get a sturdy Copy Stand. Also, use your camera’s timer or a remote control. If your camera can lock the mirror, do it and use a remote control.


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