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1937D 3 leg Buff - need opinions

I have an opportunity to purchase this coin but only have these pics that the seller has provided. I'm hoping that better eyes
than mine can help me determine that it's authentic or if there's any reason to pass on it. Thanks in advance for your help. It looks like a nice coin but I'm not an expert and I don't have super deep pockets to just "take a chance"





Comments

  • Riley1955Riley1955 Posts: 136 ✭✭✭

    What gave it away guys. Not a buff guy.

  • crazyhounddogcrazyhounddog Posts: 13,760 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I will give you my 100% guarantee that’s as bad as it gets for a counterfeit buffalo nickel. Even with the crappy pics it SCREAMS fake. Good for you to run it by the forum. You saved yourself😉

    The bitterness of "Poor Quality" is remembered long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten.
  • DRUNNERDRUNNER Posts: 3,790 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The rough surfaces of the cast counterfeit. That overall porousness is not even close. Even with those pics, and my old eyes, that surface is evident of a cast.

    Drunner

  • crazyhounddogcrazyhounddog Posts: 13,760 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited March 18, 2023 9:22AM

    @Riley1955 said:
    What gave it away guys. Not a buff guy.

    I am a buff guy. Immediately when looking at the obverse pic it’s a horrible fake. Looks like it might even be plastic. Everything about it looks wrong. It screams fake from the motif.

    The bitterness of "Poor Quality" is remembered long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten.
  • MFeldMFeld Posts: 11,745 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Agreed, it’s a no-doubt counterfeit. And regardless of whether the seller knows it, I’d steer clear of him/her.

    Mark Feld* of Heritage Auctions*Unless otherwise noted, my posts here represent my personal opinions.

  • 124Spider124Spider Posts: 802 ✭✭✭✭✭

    To me, the fact that it's not certified by a major TPG is a huge red flag, beyond which I would not go. Were this a real, problem-free coin, it would be a very valuable coin, and the cost of getting it certified would be dwarfed by the increase in its market value by having it certified.

    I would not buy an iconic coin that's not certified (especially since I'm not knowledgeable enough, even with coin in hand, to spot every possible problem with the coin). While I have issues with how TPGs make decisions, I have a high level of confidence that a straight-graded coin from a major TPG does not have significant, hidden problems.

  • MFeldMFeld Posts: 11,745 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @124Spider said:
    To me, the fact that it's not certified by a major TPG is a huge red flag, beyond which I would not go. Were this a real, problem-free coin, it would be a very valuable coin, and the cost of getting it certified would be dwarfed by the increase in its market value by having it certified.

    I would not buy an iconic coin that's not certified (especially since I'm not knowledgeable enough, even with coin in hand, to spot every possible problem with the coin). While I have issues with how TPGs make decisions, I have a high level of confidence that a straight-graded coin from a major TPG does not have significant, hidden problems.

    That said, it’s much better to have enough knowledge about coins to protect yourself against counterfeit coins in counterfeit holders. Or to be able to spot genuine coins of clearly lesser quality than the grade on a counterfeit label in a counterfeit holder would indicate.

    Mark Feld* of Heritage Auctions*Unless otherwise noted, my posts here represent my personal opinions.

  • TomBTomB Posts: 20,613 ✭✭✭✭✭

    That's an obvious modern counterfeit.

    Thomas Bush Numismatics & Numismatic Photography

    In honor of the memory of Cpl. Michael E. Thompson

    image
  • gumby1234gumby1234 Posts: 5,369 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Late to the party, but agree its not a genuine 3 legger.

    @124Spider Raw doesn't mean anything except it never got slabbed. Last year I sold my genuine 3 legger to a dealer. It was raw since the day I bought it.

    Successful BST with ad4400, Kccoin, lablover, pointfivezero, koynekwest, jwitten, coin22lover, HalfDimeDude, erwindoc, jyzskowsi, COINS MAKE CENTS, AlanSki, BryceM

  • 124Spider124Spider Posts: 802 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @gumby1234 said:
    Late to the party, but agree its not a genuine 3 legger.

    @124Spider Raw doesn't mean anything except it never got slabbed. Last year I sold my genuine 3 legger to a dealer. It was raw since the day I bought it.

    I certainly understand what "raw" means.

    My point is that, unless one is fully-confident in one's ability to determine flaws with a coin, including whether it's genuine, one should not buy an expensive coin raw. And, yes, it is a red flag when someone is advertising an expensive raw coin, when the market would value it so much higher were it certified and problem-free.

  • 124Spider124Spider Posts: 802 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @MFeld said:

    @124Spider said:
    To me, the fact that it's not certified by a major TPG is a huge red flag, beyond which I would not go. Were this a real, problem-free coin, it would be a very valuable coin, and the cost of getting it certified would be dwarfed by the increase in its market value by having it certified.

    I would not buy an iconic coin that's not certified (especially since I'm not knowledgeable enough, even with coin in hand, to spot every possible problem with the coin). While I have issues with how TPGs make decisions, I have a high level of confidence that a straight-graded coin from a major TPG does not have significant, hidden problems.

    That said, it’s much better to have enough knowledge about coins to protect yourself against counterfeit coins in counterfeit holders. Or to be able to spot genuine coins of clearly lesser quality than the grade on a counterfeit label in a counterfeit holder would indicate.

    Absolutely! But, as a first-order matter, buying raw, expensive coins is fraught with risk.

  • gumby1234gumby1234 Posts: 5,369 ✭✭✭✭✭

    True that anyone that is not knowledgeable about a coin should not buy any coin of value that isn't certified.

    Successful BST with ad4400, Kccoin, lablover, pointfivezero, koynekwest, jwitten, coin22lover, HalfDimeDude, erwindoc, jyzskowsi, COINS MAKE CENTS, AlanSki, BryceM

  • BuffaloIronTailBuffaloIronTail Posts: 7,386 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Shane6596 said:

    @gumby1234 said:
    True that anyone that is not knowledgeable about a coin should not buy any coin of value that isn't certified.

    Im glad i joined here because i may have purchased an expensive raw coin at some point and made a mistake. Many here have guided me in the right direction to study, read books etc. I dont know if i will ever buy an expensive raw coin due to so many things you need to know to be sure its real and worth the asking price.

    We're here to help. You can learn as you go. Good thing you let us see the coin.

    Pete

    "I tell them there's no problems.....only solutions" - John Lennon
  • TrampTramp Posts: 652 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited March 18, 2023 6:48PM

    @JohnThePainter said:
    Isn’t there supposed to be a die crack under the bison? I recall someone saying “if the bull ain’t pissing the leg ain’t missing”.

    The seller is slinging bull.

    Dirty fingernails was the first thing I noticed. I have two classic cars and work on them. My hands and fingernails are spotless before I go near my collection; slabbed or loose.

    USAF (Ret.) 1985 - 2005. E-4B Aircraft Maintenance Crew Chief and Contracting Officer.
    My current Registry sets:
    ✓ Everyman Mint State Carson City Morgan Dollars (1878 – 1893)
    ✓ Everyman Mint State Lincoln Cents (1909 – 1958)
    ✓ Morgan Dollar GSA Hoard (1878 – 1891)

  • TrampTramp Posts: 652 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Shane6596 said:

    @gumby1234 said:
    True that anyone that is not knowledgeable about a coin should not buy any coin of value that isn't certified.

    Im glad i joined here because i may have purchased an expensive raw coin at some point and made a mistake. Many here have guided me in the right direction to study, read books etc. I dont know if i will ever buy an expensive raw coin due to so many things you need to know to be sure its real and worth the asking price.

    No doubt. I wish I would have found this group a couple of years ago. Glad I'm here now.

    USAF (Ret.) 1985 - 2005. E-4B Aircraft Maintenance Crew Chief and Contracting Officer.
    My current Registry sets:
    ✓ Everyman Mint State Carson City Morgan Dollars (1878 – 1893)
    ✓ Everyman Mint State Lincoln Cents (1909 – 1958)
    ✓ Morgan Dollar GSA Hoard (1878 – 1891)

  • BuffaloIronTailBuffaloIronTail Posts: 7,386 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Tramp said:

    @Shane6596 said:

    @gumby1234 said:
    True that anyone that is not knowledgeable about a coin should not buy any coin of value that isn't certified.

    Im glad i joined here because i may have purchased an expensive raw coin at some point and made a mistake. Many here have guided me in the right direction to study, read books etc. I dont know if i will ever buy an expensive raw coin due to so many things you need to know to be sure its real and worth the asking price.

    No doubt. I wish I would have found this group a couple of years ago. Glad I'm here now.

    Glad to have ya!

    Pete

    "I tell them there's no problems.....only solutions" - John Lennon
  • mr1931Smr1931S Posts: 5,932 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Unless you know your keys like Carter knows pills, always buy certified. Best certified holder for expensive key date coin: Coin bought encased in genuine PCGS Gold shield with NFC anti-counterfeiting technology holder guarantees one being able to get the nightly beauty sleep he or she deserves. Fake coin ends up in one of these holders there is no way collector or collector's heirs can lose at the end of the day.

    Great spirits have always encountered violent opposition from mediocre minds.-Albert Einstein

  • MFeldMFeld Posts: 11,745 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @mr1931S said:
    Unless you know your keys like Carter knows pills, always buy certified. Best certified holder for expensive key date coin: Coin bought encased in genuine PCGS Gold shield with NFC anti-counterfeiting technology holder guarantees one being able to get the nightly beauty sleep he or she deserves. Fake coin ends up in one of these holders there is no way collector or collector's heirs can lose at the end of the day.

    What do you mean by “Fake coin ends up in one of these holders there is no way collector or collector's heirs can lose at the end of the day.”?

    Mark Feld* of Heritage Auctions*Unless otherwise noted, my posts here represent my personal opinions.

  • rickoricko Posts: 98,724 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Definitely a fake 3 legger.... Good thing you consulted here. Details described above. Cheers, RickO

  • OnedollarnohollarOnedollarnohollar Posts: 2,035 ✭✭✭✭

    "Definitely a fake 3 legger.... Good thing you consulted here. Details described above. Cheers, RickO"

    me too! thanks again for all the input that saved me an expensive lesson in numismatics!

  • BuffaloIronTailBuffaloIronTail Posts: 7,386 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The funny thing is, the 3-Leg is so distinctive from regular 1937-D coins that anyone even with a minimum amount of knowledge should be able to discern between altered and genuine coins.

    Pete

    "I tell them there's no problems.....only solutions" - John Lennon
  • ChrisH821ChrisH821 Posts: 6,283 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Things that are dead giveaway that it's a fake:
    -General mushiness of the design. What was the last Buffalo Nickel you saw that looked like that?
    -The third feather, which is all but missing from this, should show detachment but still be strong.
    -The rearmost leg, it should be weak but still distinct, the accepted term for this seems to be "moth-eaten"
    -The front leg, on a genuine coin it isn't an abruptly cut-off leg. The die was over-polished so the design gradually fades into the field.

    Collector, occasional seller

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