Home U.S. Coin Forum

I purchased two SLQ's (new images added)

[Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0
edited February 3, 2023 4:27PM in U.S. Coin Forum

I've had these for a while and never posted them. I bought them from a LCD. Very nice and honest people.
The dealer had just bought a collection of them and I was there to get first Dibbs. I got a very fair deal.They are keepers for sure.
Another masterpiece form back in the day.
I'm not going to collect the series but I may pick up a few more. The 1926 has a very cool die crack? Around 11:00.
I've seen this on other coins from this date. I want to get a FH at some point. This is definitely not a "I wonder why I bought these" issue. I know why I bought them, because they are beatiful.



Comments

  • davewesendavewesen Posts: 5,831 ✭✭✭✭✭

    nice, what is a LCD? They sure are nice. I like the type 1's, but they all are artistic.

    on the second reverse, what do you think the lines in the fields are that are generally in the 2 o'clock to 8 o'clock direction?

  • rickoricko Posts: 98,724 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Nice SLQ's... The pictures are a tad out of focus though, hard to accurately assess condition. Cheers, RickO

  • MFeldMFeld Posts: 12,005 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @davewesen said:
    nice, what is a LCD? They sure are nice. I like the type 1's, but they all are artistic.

    on the second reverse, what do you think the lines in the fields are that are generally in the 2 o'clock to 8 o'clock direction?

    LCD = local coin dealer (?)

    Light cleaning and/or circulation marks

    Mark Feld* of Heritage Auctions*Unless otherwise noted, my posts here represent my personal opinions.

  • TreashuntTreashunt Posts: 6,747 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @davewesen said:
    nice, what is a LCD? They sure are nice. I like the type 1's, but they all are artistic.

    on the second reverse, what do you think the lines in the fields are that are generally in the 2 o'clock to 8 o'clock direction?

    LCD= Local Coin Dealer

    Frank

    BHNC #203

  • They could be light cleaning marks no doubt. They are also in square plastic holders which I prefer to put my coins in. I will take better images when I get home.

  • MFeld I wish you were still a dealer. I would really like to buy coins from someone like you.
    I'm curious about what you collect. My guess is that you have an amazing collection of something. I would really like to see some of your coins.
    Of course I don't want to intrude on your privacy and do not mean to if I am.

  • DeplorableDanDeplorableDan Posts: 2,521 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Watchtower said:
    MFeld I wish you were still a dealer. I would really like to buy coins from someone like you.
    I'm curious about what you collect. My guess is that you have an amazing collection of something. I would really like to see some of your coins.
    Of course I don't want to intrude on your privacy and do not mean to if I am.

    I too would love if Mfeld was still a dealer, Im sure that back in the day he was a pleasure to do business with. That being said, you can still buy coins "from" him (sort of?). Heritage typically has a few coins in stock for BIN prices. Its not an extensive inventory, but if you ever see something you're interested in, he may be able to pull the coin and take a look at it for you. Same thing with coins being offered in heritage auctions. My most recent purchase that I have another thread about is a $5 Indian that was a heritage BIN item. For example, they have these SLQ's in stock right now:

    https://coins.ha.com/c/search-results.zx?Ne=304&N=51+791+2088+794+367&ic4=Refine-CoinCategory-102615

    With your coins, its hard to tell because the images are out of focus but the 1926 looks like a problem free AU?. The 1921 appears to have possibly been subject to a light cleaning as Mark suggested. We would need better images to be sure, but even so theres nothing wrong a light cleaning if you enjoy the coin, and the dealer was honest with you about it. We often hear stories about people who paid strong for a coin back in the day, only to find out decades later that their coins are cleaned or have hidden problems.They go to sell them to another dealer and are upset to learn they won't even break even on the coin. This is part of the reason that its recommended to buy graded examples until you have the experience to distinguish a cleaned coin from an original. You've indicated this is going to be your plan moving forward, so I commend you for taking in the advice you receive here and look forward to seeing some of your future purchases 🙂.

  • Please don't misunderstand. I am just showing them because I like them.

  • 291fifth291fifth Posts: 23,930 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Define "fair deal".

    All glory is fleeting.
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0
    edited February 3, 2023 8:17AM

    @291fifth said:
    Define "fair deal".

    Edited to ask, may I ask you what you consider a fair deal?
    We can compare thoughts and I will let you know if I concur.
    Thank you

  • spyglassdesignspyglassdesign Posts: 1,488 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited February 3, 2023 8:23AM

    If you are happy with the price and the coin then it is a fair deal for you.

    If you aren't already, you can check coinfacts.com to get a rough approximation for a coin to make sure you aren't paying more than you will ever get back should you need to sell. They even have an app so you can check in real time at the lcs.

    Congrats they are nice looking coins!

  • pursuitoflibertypursuitofliberty Posts: 6,585 ✭✭✭✭✭

    A little out of focus but the 26-D looks like could be high AU and worthwhile (might have a wipe on the reverse)

    The 21 is a great date. The coin appears to have been cleaned (wiped, maybe not terribly but it does look noticeable), and is 50ish in details


    “We are only their care-takers,” he posed, “if we take good care of them, then centuries from now they may still be here … ”

    Todd - BHNC #242
  • 291fifth291fifth Posts: 23,930 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Watchtower said:

    @291fifth said:
    Define "fair deal".

    Edited to ask, may I ask you what you consider a fair deal?
    We can compare thoughts and I will let you know if I concur.
    Thank you

    It's not my definition, it's your definition that is important. I see two raw Standing Liberty Quarters but can't grade them from those photos. Since they are raw I would expect them to be sold at a discounted price. There is no reason why you should be generous when buying raw coins since the seller hasn't paid the price for slabbing or taken the chance the coins will end up in the dreaded "genuine" holders.

    All glory is fleeting.
  • TomBTomB Posts: 20,725 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I love SLQs also. If you want a FH example then go for a 1917 Type I, these often came with FH and while they aren't exactly cheap, they can be gorgeous.

    I'm not certain if you want opinions on the coins or not, but the 1921 is absolutely circulated and dipped. I wouldn't go so far as to call it cleaned, even though hairlines are evident on the reverse, because dipped AU coinage typically shows circulation hairlines all over it. The images are fairly out of focus, but the coin appears to me to be an AU53/55. My guesstimate of a fair price or "fair deal" (really more accurately "market price") on that coin would be about $1,000 if it were already certified by PCGS as problem-free. However, and this is a big however, lots of folks might not want the coin (myself included) because of it being so bright and an AU while others might want it more. The 1926-D is a bit more tricky to figure out as it appears to have full cartwheel luster and might be MS, but I can't tell what that darkened line of chatter going from Ms. Liberty's head, down her neck and all the way down her right leg are from. Is it toning? Lighting artifact? Light rub? I don't know. I suspect it has been dipped as well as there is a partial fingerprint on the reverse and these often appear after a coin is dipped and handled too soon. I'm not concerned about the flat head since this is an issue known for the "dish head" look. I'd guesstimate this at MS6/63 with a value of about $225 with the same caveat as the 1921 that the coin would be in a PCGS problem-free holder.

    I have no idea what you paid and better images would go a long way toward allowing examination of the coins.

    Thomas Bush Numismatics & Numismatic Photography

    In honor of the memory of Cpl. Michael E. Thompson

    image
  • I'll take some time either tonight or tomorrow to try to get better images. I will also remove them from the plastic holders as this may make a big difference. I find the less I handle the actual coin the better. My hard worked hands tend to fumble a lot where small items are concerned.
    Thank you Tom for your input. I paid less for the 1921 than speculated.

  • @spyglassdesign said:
    If you are happy with the price and the coin then it is a fair deal for you.

    If you aren't already, you can check coinfacts.com to get a rough approximation for a coin to make sure you aren't paying more than you will ever get back should you need to sell. They even have an app so you can check in real time at the lcs.

    Congrats they are nice looking coins!

    Thank you for the compliment. This justifies a reason for posting and adds to the fun for me. I want to share and enjoy my coins with others. Kind of like an online coin club while simultaneously learning how to grade, avoid pitfalls and making friends.

  • braddickbraddick Posts: 23,072 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I won't add to the seasoned comments above other than to state I do appreciate the full strike on the date of the 1921.

    peacockcoins

  • MFeldMFeld Posts: 12,005 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @TomB said:
    I love SLQs also. If you want a FH example then go for a 1917 Type I, these often came with FH and while they aren't exactly cheap, they can be gorgeous.

    I'm not certain if you want opinions on the coins or not, but the 1921 is absolutely circulated and dipped. I wouldn't go so far as to call it cleaned, even though hairlines are evident on the reverse, because dipped AU coinage typically shows circulation hairlines all over it. The images are fairly out of focus, but the coin appears to me to be an AU53/55. My guesstimate of a fair price or "fair deal" (really more accurately "market price") on that coin would be about $1,000 if it were already certified by PCGS as problem-free. However, and this is a big however, lots of folks might not want the coin (myself included) because of it being so bright and an AU while others might want it more. The 1926-D is a bit more tricky to figure out as it appears to have full cartwheel luster and might be MS, but I can't tell what that darkened line of chatter going from Ms. Liberty's head, down her neck and all the way down her right leg are from. Is it toning? Lighting artifact? Light rub? I don't know. I suspect it has been dipped as well as there is a partial fingerprint on the reverse and these often appear after a coin is dipped and handled too soon. I'm not concerned about the flat head since this is an issue known for the "dish head" look. I'd guesstimate this at MS6/63 with a value of about $225 with the same caveat as the 1921 that the coin would be in a PCGS problem-free holder.

    I have no idea what you paid and better images would go a long way toward allowing examination of the coins.

    Tom, based on the images, (which leave much to be desired) my guess is that the 1926-D is also AU. I base that primarily on the lighter color seen up and down most of the right side of the eagle’s left-facing wing. It’s difficult for me to imagine that it’s anything other than rub. That said, I don’t always imagine correctly.

    Mark Feld* of Heritage Auctions*Unless otherwise noted, my posts here represent my personal opinions.

  • TomBTomB Posts: 20,725 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I think you are correct, Mark.

    Thomas Bush Numismatics & Numismatic Photography

    In honor of the memory of Cpl. Michael E. Thompson

    image
  • I'll work on my images tonight. I can do better.

  • DeplorableDanDeplorableDan Posts: 2,521 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited February 3, 2023 9:13AM

    @MFeld said:

    @TomB said:
    I love SLQs also. If you want a FH example then go for a 1917 Type I, these often came with FH and while they aren't exactly cheap, they can be gorgeous.

    I'm not certain if you want opinions on the coins or not, but the 1921 is absolutely circulated and dipped. I wouldn't go so far as to call it cleaned, even though hairlines are evident on the reverse, because dipped AU coinage typically shows circulation hairlines all over it. The images are fairly out of focus, but the coin appears to me to be an AU53/55. My guesstimate of a fair price or "fair deal" (really more accurately "market price") on that coin would be about $1,000 if it were already certified by PCGS as problem-free. However, and this is a big however, lots of folks might not want the coin (myself included) because of it being so bright and an AU while others might want it more. The 1926-D is a bit more tricky to figure out as it appears to have full cartwheel luster and might be MS, but I can't tell what that darkened line of chatter going from Ms. Liberty's head, down her neck and all the way down her right leg are from. Is it toning? Lighting artifact? Light rub? I don't know. I suspect it has been dipped as well as there is a partial fingerprint on the reverse and these often appear after a coin is dipped and handled too soon. I'm not concerned about the flat head since this is an issue known for the "dish head" look. I'd guesstimate this at MS6/63 with a value of about $225 with the same caveat as the 1921 that the coin would be in a PCGS problem-free holder.

    I have no idea what you paid and better images would go a long way toward allowing examination of the coins.

    Tom, based on the images, (which leave much to be desired) my guess is that the 1926-D is also AU. I base that primarily on the lighter color seen up and down most of the right side of the eagle’s left-facing wing. It’s difficult for me to imagine that it’s anything other than rub. That said, I don’t always imagine correctly.

    Agree, and I'm pretty sure that the details on the high points of the shield are worn, as well.

    Edit: Unless that's due to a weaker strike I guess , as it doesn't have the same lighter color

  • Okay guys I tried to take better images. I don't think you are far off with your grading and comments on these coins. Regardless they are cool and I like them. I will reveal what I paid for the 1921 and that was $850. It's one coin I do not believe I am upside down on but you can tell me. I also used my scope to image the die break on the 1926D. You will find the identical break on a same date coin with heritage. Some might think this devalues the coin. I actually like this feature. I would also agree with you Dan on the weak strike on the 1921.
    New and improved images, maybe?




  • TomBTomB Posts: 20,725 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The die crack on the 1926-D does not hurt the coin at all. Perhaps there are a few folks who wouldn't want it because of the crack, but they would be a small percentage of collectors.

    Thomas Bush Numismatics & Numismatic Photography

    In honor of the memory of Cpl. Michael E. Thompson

    image
  • It's a pretty bad die crack. You can see the going across the top but that chip/crack on the outside edge is wild!

Leave a Comment

BoldItalicStrikethroughOrdered listUnordered list
Emoji
Image
Align leftAlign centerAlign rightToggle HTML viewToggle full pageToggle lights
Drop image/file