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Mega Dime

ctf_error_coinsctf_error_coins Posts: 15,433 ✭✭✭✭✭

This is one of the largest dimes that I have handled. It is larger than a quarter. It is Massive.

Backstory... I first saw this dime on Fred's website and when I went to buy it, it had already sold. Bummer. I believe he had 2 other 2007 D huge die cap dimes and I bought one of them. A very cool coin that I bought for my son's birth year error coin type set. When I became a coin dealer, I put all my coins into inventory as required. The 2007 D dime die cap I had sold quickly.

Fast forward to recently when saw this example. I had to have it a bought it instantly.

Post a huge dime if you have one.

Comments

  • rickoricko Posts: 98,724 ✭✭✭✭✭

    WOW!!! @ErrorsOnCoins .... Another great error. Any backstory with this one? I know it is unlikely, but with major errors such as this, I always wonder where they were found. Cheers, RickO

  • 3stars3stars Posts: 2,281 ✭✭✭✭✭

    That’s pretty amazing! Can only imagine how thin it has to be to expand to that size.

    Previous transactions: Wondercoin, goldman86, dmarks, Type2
  • ctf_error_coinsctf_error_coins Posts: 15,433 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @ricko said:
    WOW!!! @ErrorsOnCoins .... Another great error. Any backstory with this one? I know it is unlikely, but with major errors such as this, I always wonder where they were found. Cheers, RickO

    You will have to ask Fred for the backstory which I would love to hear.

    Here is my best guess ....

    As we have talked about on numerous threads, there are four ways that error coins get into the market.

    1) Regular manufacturing errors that get out through normal means.

    2) Regular manufacturing errors that get smuggled out by mint employees.

    3) Regular manufacturing errors that get sorted out by a coin rolling companies such as brinks and then sold to an error coin dealer.

    4) Midnight minting by mint employees and smuggled out by mint employees.

    I will take option number 3. Real mint error made on accident and found by Brinks and then sold to a coin dealer.

  • ZoinsZoins Posts: 33,811 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Very interesting multi-struck die cap @ErrorsOnCoins!

    It looks flat from the photos.

    Can you guess how many times it was struck?

  • ctf_error_coinsctf_error_coins Posts: 15,433 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Zoins said:
    Very interesting multi-struck die cap @ErrorsOnCoins!

    It looks flat from the photos.

    Can you guess how many times it was struck?

    It is not flat. The reverse is very cupped up.

    Not crazy enough to try to count the strikes. Multi struck works for me.

  • ctf_error_coinsctf_error_coins Posts: 15,433 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I bid hard on that coin and did not win.

    I should have bid higher.

  • ZoinsZoins Posts: 33,811 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @ErrorsOnCoins said:
    I bid hard on that coin and did not win.

    I should have bid higher.

    They are both great coins. It can be tough to lose, but you do have an abundance of great coins!

    But I was wondering if we can ask PCGS to count going forwards so more could be made :)

  • ctf_error_coinsctf_error_coins Posts: 15,433 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Zoins said:

    @ErrorsOnCoins said:
    I bid hard on that coin and did not win.

    I should have bid higher.

    They are both great coins. It can be tough to lose, but you do have an abundance of great coins!

    But I was wondering if we can ask PCGS to count going forwards so more could be made :)

    As a collector, I hated losing a coin to another collector.

    As a dealer, it is so much easier and I just move on.

  • ByersByers Posts: 1,458 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Great visual and dramatic die cap!

    mikebyers.com Dealer in Major Mint Errors, Die Trials & Patterns - Author of NLG Best World Coin Book World's Greatest Mint Errors - Publisher & Editor of minterrornews.com.
  • ZoinsZoins Posts: 33,811 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @ErrorsOnCoins said:

    @Zoins said:

    @ErrorsOnCoins said:
    I bid hard on that coin and did not win.

    I should have bid higher.

    They are both great coins. It can be tough to lose, but you do have an abundance of great coins!

    But I was wondering if we can ask PCGS to count going forwards so more could be made :)

    As a collector, I hated losing a coin to another collector.

    As a dealer, it is so much easier and I just move on.

    Good thinking. In the end, it's good for collectors to think they are just temporary caretakers... so does that mean everyone is a dealer in the very end? :)

  • rickoricko Posts: 98,724 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @ErrorsOnCoins ... Thanks for the reply.... And the four options. Cheers, RickO

  • 3stars3stars Posts: 2,281 ✭✭✭✭✭

    It just happened to be exactly 100 times? I think a bit of tongue in cheek humor on that one.

    Previous transactions: Wondercoin, goldman86, dmarks, Type2
  • Mr Lindy Mr Lindy Posts: 982 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited December 3, 2022 4:42PM

    2007D was a leaky year and Mint for Errors that made it out.

    Some seem made for market, like a 30c piece I own, others seem, like your Dime, minting mistakes riddled out of coinage stream that then made it out.

    My picture here is a 2007D 1c

    @ErrorsOnCoins said:

    @ricko said:
    WOW!!! @ErrorsOnCoins .... Another great error. Any backstory with this one? I know it is unlikely, but with major errors such as this, I always wonder where they were found. Cheers, RickO

    You will have to ask Fred for the backstory which I would love to hear.

    Here is my best guess ....

    As we have talked about on numerous threads, there are four ways that error coins get into the market.

    1) Regular manufacturing errors that get out through normal means.

    2) Regular manufacturing errors that get smuggled out by mint employees.

    3) Regular manufacturing errors that get sorted out by a coin rolling companies such as brinks and then sold to an error coin dealer.

    4) Midnight minting by mint employees and smuggled out by mint employees.

    I will take option number 3. Real mint error made on accident and found by Brinks and then sold to a coin dealer.

  • OAKSTAROAKSTAR Posts: 5,786 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I just don't have the vocabulary to articulate your errors!


    Disclaimer: I'm not a dealer, trader, grader, investor or professional numismatist. I'm just a hobbyist. (To protect me but mostly you! 🤣 )

  • JimnightJimnight Posts: 10,804 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Nice one!

  • tcollectstcollects Posts: 825 ✭✭✭✭

    he had a vision for our country

  • ctf_error_coinsctf_error_coins Posts: 15,433 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @LindyS said:
    2007D was a leaky year and Mint for Errors that made it out.

    Some seem made for market, like a 30c piece I own, others seem, like your Dime, minting mistakes riddled out of coinage stream that then made it out.

    My picture here is a 2007D 1c

    @ErrorsOnCoins said:

    @ricko said:
    WOW!!! @ErrorsOnCoins .... Another great error. Any backstory with this one? I know it is unlikely, but with major errors such as this, I always wonder where they were found. Cheers, RickO

    You will have to ask Fred for the backstory which I would love to hear.

    Here is my best guess ....

    As we have talked about on numerous threads, there are four ways that error coins get into the market.

    1) Regular manufacturing errors that get out through normal means.

    2) Regular manufacturing errors that get smuggled out by mint employees.

    3) Regular manufacturing errors that get sorted out by a coin rolling companies such as brinks and then sold to an error coin dealer.

    4) Midnight minting by mint employees and smuggled out by mint employees.

    I will take option number 3. Real mint error made on accident and found by Brinks and then sold to a coin dealer.

    LindyS, yes this coin could have been made on accident and then got leaked out by a mint employee(s) making option 2 possible as well.

  • ZoinsZoins Posts: 33,811 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @ErrorsOnCoins said:

    @LindyS said:
    2007D was a leaky year and Mint for Errors that made it out.

    Some seem made for market, like a 30c piece I own, others seem, like your Dime, minting mistakes riddled out of coinage stream that then made it out.

    My picture here is a 2007D 1c

    @ErrorsOnCoins said:

    @ricko said:
    WOW!!! @ErrorsOnCoins .... Another great error. Any backstory with this one? I know it is unlikely, but with major errors such as this, I always wonder where they were found. Cheers, RickO

    You will have to ask Fred for the backstory which I would love to hear.

    Here is my best guess ....

    As we have talked about on numerous threads, there are four ways that error coins get into the market.

    1) Regular manufacturing errors that get out through normal means.

    2) Regular manufacturing errors that get smuggled out by mint employees.

    3) Regular manufacturing errors that get sorted out by a coin rolling companies such as brinks and then sold to an error coin dealer.

    4) Midnight minting by mint employees and smuggled out by mint employees.

    I will take option number 3. Real mint error made on accident and found by Brinks and then sold to a coin dealer.

    LindyS, yes this coin could have been made on accident and then got leaked out by a mint employee(s) making option 2 possible as well.

    Anything know about the 2007 events?

  • ctf_error_coinsctf_error_coins Posts: 15,433 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Zoins said:

    @ErrorsOnCoins said:

    @LindyS said:
    2007D was a leaky year and Mint for Errors that made it out.

    Some seem made for market, like a 30c piece I own, others seem, like your Dime, minting mistakes riddled out of coinage stream that then made it out.

    My picture here is a 2007D 1c

    @ErrorsOnCoins said:

    @ricko said:
    WOW!!! @ErrorsOnCoins .... Another great error. Any backstory with this one? I know it is unlikely, but with major errors such as this, I always wonder where they were found. Cheers, RickO

    You will have to ask Fred for the backstory which I would love to hear.

    Here is my best guess ....

    As we have talked about on numerous threads, there are four ways that error coins get into the market.

    1) Regular manufacturing errors that get out through normal means.

    2) Regular manufacturing errors that get smuggled out by mint employees.

    3) Regular manufacturing errors that get sorted out by a coin rolling companies such as brinks and then sold to an error coin dealer.

    4) Midnight minting by mint employees and smuggled out by mint employees.

    I will take option number 3. Real mint error made on accident and found by Brinks and then sold to a coin dealer.

    LindyS, yes this coin could have been made on accident and then got leaked out by a mint employee(s) making option 2 possible as well.

    Anything know about the 2007 events?

    That's above my pay grade.

    I buy in the secondary market.

  • Mr Lindy Mr Lindy Posts: 982 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I wasn't there so I don't actually know first-hand.

    ;^)

    Fred enlightened me, maybe Jon too. They were the sources for mine.

    They both handled them years ago when there was an awesome selection. I think several 2007D errors from the leak changed hands via Heritage too. You might find the past auction lots as you are a Master Numismatic Researcher. It would be great if you shared once you create that handy linky.

    I actually never bought an error via Heritage, so I do not have their completed error coin listings memorized. The Misfits are loaded with error treasures. Somebody is letting go of a lifetime collection.

    @Zoins said:

    @ErrorsOnCoins said:

    @LindyS said:
    2007D was a leaky year and Mint for Errors that made it out.

    Some seem made for market, like a 30c piece I own, others seem, like your Dime, minting mistakes riddled out of coinage stream that then made it out.

    My picture here is a 2007D 1c

    @ErrorsOnCoins said:

    @ricko said:
    WOW!!! @ErrorsOnCoins .... Another great error. Any backstory with this one? I know it is unlikely, but with major errors such as this, I always wonder where they were found. Cheers, RickO

    You will have to ask Fred for the backstory which I would love to hear.

    Here is my best guess ....

    As we have talked about on numerous threads, there are four ways that error coins get into the market.

    1) Regular manufacturing errors that get out through normal means.

    2) Regular manufacturing errors that get smuggled out by mint employees.

    3) Regular manufacturing errors that get sorted out by a coin rolling companies such as brinks and then sold to an error coin dealer.

    4) Midnight minting by mint employees and smuggled out by mint employees.

    I will take option number 3. Real mint error made on accident and found by Brinks and then sold to a coin dealer.

    LindyS, yes this coin could have been made on accident and then got leaked out by a mint employee(s) making option 2 possible as well.

    Anything know about the 2007 events?

  • ZoinsZoins Posts: 33,811 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited December 4, 2022 12:33PM

    @LindyS said:
    I wasn't there so I don't actually know first-hand.

    ;^)

    Fred enlightened me, maybe Jon too. They were the sources for mine.

    They both handled them years ago when there was an awesome selection. I think several 2007D errors from the leak changed hands via Heritage too. You might find the past auction lots as you are a Master Numismatic Researcher. It would be great if you shared once you create that handy linky.

    I actually never bought an error via Heritage, so I do not have their completed error coin listings memorized. The Misfits are loaded with error treasures. Somebody is letting go of a lifetime collection.

    @Zoins said:

    @ErrorsOnCoins said:

    @LindyS said:
    2007D was a leaky year and Mint for Errors that made it out.

    Some seem made for market, like a 30c piece I own, others seem, like your Dime, minting mistakes riddled out of coinage stream that then made it out.

    My picture here is a 2007D 1c

    @ErrorsOnCoins said:

    @ricko said:
    WOW!!! @ErrorsOnCoins .... Another great error. Any backstory with this one? I know it is unlikely, but with major errors such as this, I always wonder where they were found. Cheers, RickO

    You will have to ask Fred for the backstory which I would love to hear.

    Here is my best guess ....

    As we have talked about on numerous threads, there are four ways that error coins get into the market.

    1) Regular manufacturing errors that get out through normal means.

    2) Regular manufacturing errors that get smuggled out by mint employees.

    3) Regular manufacturing errors that get sorted out by a coin rolling companies such as brinks and then sold to an error coin dealer.

    4) Midnight minting by mint employees and smuggled out by mint employees.

    I will take option number 3. Real mint error made on accident and found by Brinks and then sold to a coin dealer.

    LindyS, yes this coin could have been made on accident and then got leaked out by a mint employee(s) making option 2 possible as well.

    Anything know about the 2007 events?

    Seems like we need @FredWeinberg and @SullivanNumismatics to chime in!

  • Mr Lindy Mr Lindy Posts: 982 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited December 4, 2022 3:30PM

    Here's some 2007D errors offered by Heritage:

    https://coins.ha.com/c/search-results.zx?No=25&Nty=1&Ntk=SI_Titles-Desc&Ne=230&N=51+790+231+232&Ntt="2007-D"+ERROR&limitTo=790+231+232

    Only a few at Heritage seem extreme. I own two of them. I've seen more exotics elsewhere

  • ZoinsZoins Posts: 33,811 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @LindyS said:
    Here's some 2007D errors offered by Heritage:

    https://coins.ha.com/c/search-results.zx?No=25&Nty=1&Ntk=SI_Titles-Desc&Ne=230&N=51+790+231+232&Ntt="2007-D"+ERROR&limitTo=790+231+232

    Only a few at Heritage seem extreme. I own two of them. I've seen more exotics elsewhere

    The first one looks awesome!

    The second one looks neat!


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