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Need help on Modern day gold coins

_15 years ago I had 15 gold one ounce Buffalos, Maple Leafs...etc. I sold them to help family member. Now today if I buy them back, wouldn't it be smarter to buy current dates instead of the older date Buffalos that I sold? The older dates command a higher price, but are they really worth the difference in price going forward? I'm just buying to hold for children.

Comments

  • TomBTomB Posts: 20,726 ✭✭✭✭✭

    In my opinion, bullion gold is bullion gold. If you are buying it as a hedge against inflation, to diversify your holdings, as a play in the metals market or for any other reason where you don't care about a "set" then I would go for what you value as the most bang for the buck.

    Good luck!

    Thomas Bush Numismatics & Numismatic Photography

    In honor of the memory of Cpl. Michael E. Thompson

    image
  • jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,850 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited September 19, 2022 11:35AM

    Depends on what your buying. Older date bullion is usually cheaper than the current year. If you are talking graded material, most of them aren't worth the premium IMHO.

    If you're buying bullion, buy the closest to spot that you can get. If you want collector coins, then you might want the older coins that currently have a premium because that premium represents collector demand. However, premiums can evaporate and my crystal ball is broken.

    You can buy a 90% silver dime for $2. You can also buy a 1916-D dime for $1000+. Is the "premium" worth it?

  • rickoricko Posts: 98,724 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Even buying at today's prices (compared to twenty years ago), you will be paying a lot more than you did originally. So buy as close to spot as you can find. Unless you want 'collector' value.... and that can change... Then you will pay super premiums and 'hope' they continue to be valued. Good luck, Cheers, RickO

  • MarkKelleyMarkKelley Posts: 1,759 ✭✭✭✭✭

    To each his own but I personally would buy the lowest price regardless of dates.

  • derrybderryb Posts: 36,189 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Keep an open mind, or get financially repressed -Zoltan Pozsar

  • BillJonesBillJones Posts: 33,479 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited September 20, 2022 8:17AM

    So far as silver goes, a local dealer charges a dollar less for "old" American Silver Eagles than the current dates. If I were buying silver, I'd buy those coins for the least I could. Unless there is a "rare date" lurking somewhere, no one will care five or ten years from now what date is on the ASE.

    Retired dealer and avid collector of U.S. type coins, 19th century presidential campaign medalets and selected medals. In recent years I have been working on a set of British coins - at least one coin from each king or queen who issued pieces that are collectible. I am also collecting at least one coin for each Roman emperor from Julius Caesar to ... ?
  • Just getting back now. Thanks for information. When you say "as close to spot", I see on Ebay some dealers sell considerably less than others for the same bullion coin. It seems the "Bufaloes sell for more that say the Canadian Maple leaf. They are both .999999 fine. I assume the premium is for the US Buffalo stamp versus the Maple leaf. I just want the gold coins. One of every kind would suit me as I'm holding for the family. Is that a fair assumption?

  • AUandAGAUandAG Posts: 24,536 ✭✭✭✭✭

    A twenty dollar gold piece, historically, will buy a top notch, 3 piece mans suit (no purse or heels).
    So, I'd buy the least expensive I could get from a reliable source. Be sure you know how to test to see if they are real when you receive.
    bob :)

    Registry: CC lowballs (boblindstrom), bobinvegas1989@yahoo.com
  • JBKJBK Posts: 14,738 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I'm a little afraid to even ask, but you mentioned a couple times that you are buying/holding for children/family.

    Are these purely bullion "investments"? Are they collectables? Are you assuming/hoping that the recipients will have any interest?

    It's your decision either way, of course, but I am just wondering what the real motive is as it would impact any answers people offer.

  • @JBK

    I'm strictly buying for children/grandchildren as investments. I originally bought them 15 years ago to hold also. But I sold to help family member(who never paid me back!) I have coin collections and currency collections for myself that I will also leave them. I just think they would love gold bullion too. I think I see that I'll just follow advice and buy cheapest gold bullion. Thanks to all. AC PS Other than biting a gold coin, I don't know how to test it!!!

  • rec78rec78 Posts: 5,685 ✭✭✭✭✭

    If buying for bullion. Buy the coins with lowest premium over melt.

    image
  • Cougar1978Cougar1978 Posts: 7,613 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited September 25, 2022 8:17PM

    Buy slabbed MS69 bullion gold coins. AGB, AGE. I would look for ones close to melt.

    So Cali Area - Coins & Currency
  • CladiatorCladiator Posts: 17,919 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I'd love to inherit a bunch of old Engelhard, Pamp, Perth and Johnson Matthey gold bars :)

  • daltexdaltex Posts: 3,486 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @BillJones said:
    So far as silver goes, a local dealer charges a dollar less for "old" American Silver Eagles than the current dates. If I were buying silver, I'd buy those coins for the least I could. Unless there is a "rare date" lurking somewhere, no one will care five or ten years from now what date is on the ASE.

    And if you're stacking, I'd agree with you, but I think this is targeted at people who want to buy just one, or at most a few, to commemorate a special occasion. For example, a collector/silver bug might wish to have a 2022 dated Eagle to give to each member of his wedding party, or a 25th anniversary present. I may be wrong, but I think that is the reason they sell for more.

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