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Post your coin glass!

Coin glass, or "Silver age glass," is a spectacular combination of numismatics and whatever you call the hobby of collecting glassware. Although genuine coins usually weren't used to create glass featuring a coin, the designs copied onto the glass could be very successful in recreating the original coin design chosen. It often resulted in a fragile, beautiful, sometimes-coated-in-toxic-paint-or-having-uranium-inclusions piece of art. Post any coin glass you might have lying about or have pictures of!

Here's some on eBay:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/284858152689?mkcid=16&mkevt=1&mkrid=711-127632-2357-0&ssspo=MoN13_UoT46&sssrc=2349624&ssuid=ws-7tvnjshe&var=&widget_ver=artemis&media=COPY

Young Numismatist

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    OAKSTAROAKSTAR Posts: 5,806 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Disclaimer: I'm not a dealer, trader, grader, investor or professional numismatist. I'm just a hobbyist. (To protect me but mostly you! 🤣 )

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    OAKSTAROAKSTAR Posts: 5,806 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Oh sorry, that kind of glass...............never mind!

    Disclaimer: I'm not a dealer, trader, grader, investor or professional numismatist. I'm just a hobbyist. (To protect me but mostly you! 🤣 )

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    OldhoopsterOldhoopster Posts: 2,930 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The ex got it in the divorce 😭

    FYI - The Corning Museum of Glass has quite a few pieces of coin glass on display.

    Member of the ANA since 1982
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    rickoricko Posts: 98,724 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Not mine, just saw it surfing the net.... Cheers, RickO

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    PerryHallPerryHall Posts: 45,405 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Be careful---a lot of coin glass is still being produced in the style of the antique coin glass.

    Worry is the interest you pay on a debt you may not owe.

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    rheddenrhedden Posts: 6,616 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited June 26, 2022 9:13AM

    Here's another post that misses the mark in terms of actually being "coin glass." These "coin glasses" were offered for sale in the 1990s, if I recall correctly. I ran into a whole mess of them in my friend's antiques collective in 2018. I think I picked them all up for $35 or so. Another set turned up locally that was even larger, and maybe I should have bought them, but I only have so much space in my cupboards. Plus, how many coin dealers am I going to have over at my house at once?

    Anyone want to play a drinking game? Every time one of your coins makes a gold CAC sticker, you have to take a shot of Goldschlager out of one of these golden tumblers. :p

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    OAKSTAROAKSTAR Posts: 5,806 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Disclaimer: I'm not a dealer, trader, grader, investor or professional numismatist. I'm just a hobbyist. (To protect me but mostly you! 🤣 )

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    dunkleosteus430dunkleosteus430 Posts: 471 ✭✭✭✭

    Interesting story, @rhedden . I believe the "original" coin glass was made in the late 19th century and featured patterns of real U.S. coins such as seated liberty coinage and Morgan dollars. The Morgan dollars on these pieces often had the date "1892". The piece @ricko posted was made sometime from 1958 to 1982, and was produced by a glass company called Fostoria. Fostoria's coin glass was unlike the 19th century coin glass as it didn't feature real coins, but rather medallion-like symbols with things like stars, eagles and bells, although each piece of glass had the date "1887" on it to commemorate when Fostoria was founded. Fostoria made many pieces for the company Avon, too. These pieces had the same "coins" as the normal Fostoria coin glass, but the date was changed to 1886, when Avon was founded.
    The piece I posted isn't related to either of those, and it was made in 1972 by a completely different company.

    Young Numismatist

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    BustDMsBustDMs Posts: 1,570 ✭✭✭✭✭

    If I’m not mistaken I think the first coin glass was made for the Colombian Expo, hence the 1892 date.

    Glass guys?

    Q: When does a collector become a numismatist?



    A: The year they spend more on their library than their coin collection.



    A numismatist is judged more on the content of their library than the content of their cabinet.
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    dunkleosteus430dunkleosteus430 Posts: 471 ✭✭✭✭

    @BustDMs I think I know what you're talking about, I believe there was an 1892 date on a glass medallion featuring the same design as the commemorative half dollar. There's one on eBay for $5000:

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/114267022210?mkcid=16&mkevt=1&mkrid=711-127632-2357-0&ssspo=xHzlV67YQO2&sssrc=2349624&ssuid=ws-7tvnjshe&var=&widget_ver=artemis&media=COPY

    However, I was talking about actual glassware (cups, plates, vases, etc.)
    Here's something I found on the original coin glass online:

    https://www.realorrepro.com/article/U.S.-Coin-Pattern--Pressed-Glass

    "Opinions still differ on why most of the coins in the pattern are dated 1892 when actual production began in 1891. Was the pattern to commemorate the Columbian Exhibition at the Chicago World's Fair of 1892? Or was it to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the U.S. Mint? No company records exist to tell us which is correct."

    Also, to @OAKSTAR -- why can't you just collect and eat chocolate coins?

    Young Numismatist

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    OAKSTAROAKSTAR Posts: 5,806 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I'm way ahead of you @dunkleosteus430! 🤣 😂

    Disclaimer: I'm not a dealer, trader, grader, investor or professional numismatist. I'm just a hobbyist. (To protect me but mostly you! 🤣 )

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    OldhoopsterOldhoopster Posts: 2,930 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Couldn't get the download, here's a reference to an article about the history of coin glass. No idea where or if it can be located outside of the CMoG

    https://www.cmog.org/library/history-coin-glass

    And a book

    https://www.cmog.org/library/us-coin-columbian-coin-pattern-glass-tim-timmerman-pete-rissell?search=library_collection:1d0ad6db249694155c0e2f7e5bbc4128&page=0

    Member of the ANA since 1982
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    OldhoopsterOldhoopster Posts: 2,930 ✭✭✭✭✭

    From the Corning Museum of Glass

    DESCRIPTION
    Colorless lead glass; blown, pattern-molded. Conical bowl with heavy, molded ribbing at base, pinched into diamonds ("nipt diamond waies"); three mereses above a hollow ball knop with four applied molded "raspberry" prunts and containing a silver Maundy 2d. coin of Queen Anne, dated 1713; above two small mereses and a hollow inverted baluster; folded foot; rough pontil mark on underside.

    Member of the ANA since 1982
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    amwldcoinamwldcoin Posts: 11,269 ✭✭✭✭✭

    This is what is real coin glass to me and is very collectible. There are quite a few different colors and many different pieces. I guess I have 10 or 12 pieces.

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    dunkleosteus430dunkleosteus430 Posts: 471 ✭✭✭✭

    @Oldhoopster said:
    Couldn't get the download, here's a reference to an article about the history of coin glass. No idea where or if it can be located outside of the CMoG

    https://www.cmog.org/library/history-coin-glass

    And a book

    https://www.cmog.org/library/us-coin-columbian-coin-pattern-glass-tim-timmerman-pete-rissell?search=library_collection:1d0ad6db249694155c0e2f7e5bbc4128&page=0

    Did those bring up an article for you? For me it just had some ID numbers and an author or something.
    The other links were good, though. Interesting 1794 cent! I wonder what it would grade. How would coins get into glass, though? It would probably be really high temperature and damage it, right?
    @lilolme I've seen a piece like that on eBay, just not as pretty. It's opaque and is the color of wood.

    @OAKSTAR , I hope this doesn't start a rivalry or anything, but...

    @amwldcoin you seem to have some Fostoria glass! Where'd you get it?

    Young Numismatist

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    OldhoopsterOldhoopster Posts: 2,930 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @dunkleosteus430 said:

    @Oldhoopster said:
    Couldn't get the download, here's a reference to an article about the history of coin glass. No idea where or if it can be located outside of the CMoG

    https://www.cmog.org/library/history-coin-glass

    And a book

    https://www.cmog.org/library/us-coin-columbian-coin-pattern-glass-tim-timmerman-pete-rissell?search=library_collection:1d0ad6db249694155c0e2f7e5bbc4128&page=0

    Did those bring up an article for you? For me it just had some ID numbers and an author or something.
    The other links were good, though. Interesting 1794 cent! I wonder what it would grade. How would coins get into glass, though? It would probably be really high temperature and damage it, right?

    The links did not have the actual articles, but with the titles and periodicals a person could do a deeper search to find them, if interested

    Your piece appears to be modern (recent Fostoria maybe). If I recall correctly, the original pressed pieces from the 1890s could not use the exact representation of US Coins (made the Govt upset). In addtion, the design was carved into a metal mold. That mold was filled with soft glass and pressed to form the object. It was easier and faster (and legal) to carve a close approximation without all the detail.

    The coins blown into glass pieces are very interesting. When I was last at the museum a few years ago, many were still on display. Unfortunately, you couldn't get close enough to see the coin in detail but some did have a "cloudy" appearance, either from the heat or residual gasses sealed in the cavity. I don't recall seeing the item with the 1794 cent, but did see some early English Silver and a bust dime

    Member of the ANA since 1982
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    amwldcoinamwldcoin Posts: 11,269 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @dunkleosteus430 said:

    @Oldhoopster said:
    Couldn't get the download, here's a reference to an article about the history of coin glass. No idea where or if it can be located outside of the CMoG

    https://www.cmog.org/library/history-coin-glass

    And a book

    https://www.cmog.org/library/us-coin-columbian-coin-pattern-glass-tim-timmerman-pete-rissell?search=library_collection:1d0ad6db249694155c0e2f7e5bbc4128&page=0

    Did those bring up an article for you? For me it just had some ID numbers and an author or something.
    The other links were good, though. Interesting 1794 cent! I wonder what it would grade. How would coins get into glass, though? It would probably be really high temperature and damage it, right?
    @lilolme I've seen a piece like that on eBay, just not as pretty. It's opaque and is the color of wood.

    @OAKSTAR , I hope this doesn't start a rivalry or anything, but...

    @amwldcoin you seem to have some Fostoria glass! Where'd you get it?

    Got most of them at coin shows over the years. Don't see much of it around these days.

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    Mr_SpudMr_Spud Posts: 4,436 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I saw this one at the local antique store today

    Mr_Spud

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    dunkleosteus430dunkleosteus430 Posts: 471 ✭✭✭✭

    @Mr_Spud is that even glass? Looks like metal from your photo.

    Young Numismatist

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    Mr_SpudMr_Spud Posts: 4,436 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited June 26, 2022 5:55PM

    It appeared to be metallized glass

    Mr_Spud

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    bearcavebearcave Posts: 3,993 ✭✭✭✭✭


    Is it anything like this/?

    Ken
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    dunkleosteus430dunkleosteus430 Posts: 471 ✭✭✭✭

    @bearcave I've seen stuff like that. They're usually given away by banks to clients or from businesses to employees. I wish my bank would give me one... Haha. It looks like a paperweight. There are many similar items on eBay, but most are Lincoln cents or Sacagawea dollars.

    Young Numismatist

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    rheddenrhedden Posts: 6,616 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @lilolme said:
    I don't know anything about coin glass. Don't know what this is but I liked the colors so now it is mine.
    Outer diameter about 3.5".

    Artificial toning on that Morgan. The chromatic don't progress in the right order. Plus, who else has a green/purple toned 1889? Oh wait...

    (I would have bought that dish in a heartbeat :) ).

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    bearcavebearcave Posts: 3,993 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @dunkleosteus430 😀
    It's acrylic and I knew it wasn't
    glass! I would say it's a good paperweight! I got mine off Ebay in the early 2000's.

    Ken
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    dunkleosteus430dunkleosteus430 Posts: 471 ✭✭✭✭

    @rhedden , here's one on eBay that's similar to the one that @lilolme has. It seems to be made by the same manufacturer, Joe St. Clair, just not iridescent.
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/255056384332?mkcid=16&mkevt=1&mkrid=711-127632-2357-0&ssspo=oFBnUVeuQTm&sssrc=2349624&ssuid=ws-7tvnjshe&var=&widget_ver=artemis&media=COPY

    @bearcave , here's another paperweight on eBay.
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/255439214512?mkcid=16&mkevt=1&mkrid=711-127632-2357-0&ssspo=k4WcdUWwRsa&sssrc=2349624&ssuid=ws-7tvnjshe&var=&widget_ver=artemis&media=COPY

    Looks like the dollar fell out, though, now there's only it's ghost!

    Young Numismatist

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    lilolmelilolme Posts: 2,457 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @bearcave said:
    @dunkleosteus430 😀
    It's acrylic and I knew it wasn't
    glass! I would say it's a good paperweight! I got mine off Ebay in the early 2000's.

    I just realized what that is. When I first saw it in the thread I didn't get it. I have several of these 'paperweight' coins. When I was in an area with antique stores and walking through if I saw one I bought it. Usually less than $20 and sometimes half that as I recall. So why not. Now the one with the polished cc dollar I got was much more. :)

    https://youtube.com/watch?v=2YNufnS_kf4 - Mama I'm coming home ...................................................................................................................................................................... RLJ 1958 - 2023

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    LewLew Posts: 170 ✭✭✭

    I have two. They both are glass.
    Both have symbol on reverse -- a V enclosed in a circle.
    They are both 3 1/2 inches diameter.
    Indian Head cent is dated 1884
    Mercury dime is dated 1916.
    There are 13 stars circled around coin image.

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    bearcavebearcave Posts: 3,993 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @lilolme said:

    @bearcave said:
    @dunkleosteus430 😀
    It's acrylic and I knew it wasn't
    glass! I would say it's a good paperweight! I got mine off Ebay in the early 2000's.

    I just realized what that is. When I first saw it in the thread I didn't get it. I have several of these 'paperweight' coins. When I was in an area with antique stores and walking through if I saw one I bought it. Usually less than $20 and sometimes half that as I recall. So why not. Now the one with the polished cc dollar I got was much more. :)

    I paid about that for mine !! 😀 it is a plain 1896 Morgan.

    Ken
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    Mr_SpudMr_Spud Posts: 4,436 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I spotted these coin glasses today in a vintage store. They match the ones rhedden posted

    Mr_Spud

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    dunkleosteus430dunkleosteus430 Posts: 471 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November 25, 2022 4:23PM

    Those are pretty cool! Thanks for sharing.

    Young Numismatist

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    lordmarcovanlordmarcovan Posts: 43,198 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Neat stuff in this thread.


    Explore collections of lordmarcovan on CollecOnline, management, safe-keeping, sharing and valuation solution for art piece and collectibles.
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    JetstreamJetstream Posts: 36 ✭✭✭

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    LazybonesLazybones Posts: 1,394 ✭✭✭✭✭

    USAF (Ret) 1974 - 1994 - The inherent vice of capitalism is the unequal sharing of blessings; the inherent virtue of socialism is the equal sharing of miseries. Remembering RickO, a brother in arms.

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