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Hello everyone new here 2000 error penny?

Hi guys and gals, hope the day

is treating you well 😊

I started coin collecting about a year ago when I saw my first 1776 1976 bicentennial Washington quarter. Had no idea about the dynamics of change and just got hooked.

The other day as I was looking through a group of coins(my friends have been giving me their loose saved up change they find my hobby amusing) which is nice and I stumbled on this penny.

Is this something common? I tried to look it up but I'm not even sure what I'm looking for.

Thanks for reading and cheers again everyone! πŸ˜„

Comments

  • TwoSides2aCoinTwoSides2aCoin Posts: 41,936 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Greased filled the die. This obliterated the details in the date. Cool find. Keep up the search

  • _J_H_B__J_H_B_ Posts: 10 ✭

    @TwoSides2aCoin said:
    Greased filled the die. This obliterated the details in the date. Cool find. Keep up the search

    Greased filled the die, okay neat! I'll be more attentive of these terms(boy theres a lot of them). Thank you for letting me know!

  • WAYNEASWAYNEAS Posts: 734 ✭✭✭✭

    Welcome aboard.
    Is it a 2001 date?
    I'll say that the light date is due to die wear or the die becoming "filled in" with maybe grease or both.
    I am sure that you will get some better answers here in a short time.
    Keep up the roll searches.

  • ErrorsOnCoinsErrorsOnCoins Posts: 12,026 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Nice die fill error coin.

    Welcome :)

  • FredWeinbergFredWeinberg Posts: 4,900 ✭✭✭✭✭

    We call it 'struck thru grease"

    ...it can be machinery oil, or grease.

    Collector & Dealer in Major Mint Error Coins & Currency since the 1960's.Co-Author of Whitman's "100 Greatest U.S. Mint Error Coins", and the Error Coin Encyclopedia, Vols., III & IV.
    Authenticator for Major Mint Errors
    for PCGS. A 42 +-Year PNG Member, and an ICTA Board Member.A full time coin dealer since 1972.
  • _J_H_B__J_H_B_ Posts: 10 ✭

    @WAYNEAS said:
    Welcome aboard.
    Is it a 2001 date?
    I'll say that the light date is due to die wear or the die becoming "filled in" with maybe grease or both.
    I am sure that you will get some better answers here in a short time.
    Keep up the roll searches.

    When the light shines on just right you can read "2000" I think maybe a D mint mark, its really hard to tell. I asked a local coin dealer about it and he said the date was probably rubbed off.

  • _J_H_B__J_H_B_ Posts: 10 ✭

    @FredWeinberg said:
    We call it 'struck thru grease"

    ...it can be machinery oil, or grease.

    Struck thru grease, okay. I had no idea that that could happen. I can't wait til our mint opens up so I can go on a tour. How neat are coins, right?

  • ErrorsOnCoinsErrorsOnCoins Posts: 12,026 ✭✭✭✭✭

    J_H_B said:

    @WAYNEAS said:
    Welcome aboard.
    Is it a 2001 date?
    I'll say that the light date is due to die wear or the die becoming "filled in" with maybe grease or both.
    I am sure that you will get some better answers here in a short time.
    Keep up the roll searches.

    When the light shines on just right you can read "2000" I think maybe a D mint mark, its really hard to tell. I asked a local coin dealer about it and he said the date was probably rubbed off.

    Your local dealer is wrong and should not be giving advice on error coins :o

  • WAYNEASWAYNEAS Posts: 734 ✭✭✭✭

    J_H_B said:

    @WAYNEAS said:
    Welcome aboard.
    Is it a 2001 date?
    I'll say that the light date is due to die wear or the die becoming "filled in" with maybe grease or both.
    I am sure that you will get some better answers here in a short time.
    Keep up the roll searches.

    When the light shines on just right you can read "2000" I think maybe a D mint mark, its really hard to tell. I asked a local coin dealer about it and he said the date was probably rubbed off.

    Well if it is a 2000 date, the coin is a standard "close AM" type. The wide AM's are more desirable and a little harder to find. Notice in "America" that there is a space between the E and the M and the M almost touches the A. A wide AM has the M more evenly spaced towards the E. Keep up your searches.
    Next time you see your dealer, you can inform him of what and how this actually happened.

  • @WAYNEAS said:

    J_H_B said:

    @WAYNEAS said:
    Welcome aboard.
    Is it a 2001 date?
    I'll say that the light date is due to die wear or the die becoming "filled in" with maybe grease or both.
    I am sure that you will get some better answers here in a short time.
    Keep up the roll searches.

    When the light shines on just right you can read "2000" I think maybe a D mint mark, its really hard to tell. I asked a local coin dealer about it and he said the date was probably rubbed off.

    Well if it is a 2000 date, the coin is a standard "close AM" type. The wide AM's are more desirable and a little harder to find. Notice in "America" that there is a space between the E and the M and the M almost touches the A. A wide AM has the M more evenly spaced towards the E. Keep up your searches.
    Next time you see your dealer, you can inform him of what and how this actually happened.

    Hum hum, interesting, now I wish it was a 2001! How fun!

    Thank you for the information, I'm really glad I joined this group. This is so much more enjoyable with other to talk to about it πŸ˜ƒ

  • JimnightJimnight Posts: 7,984 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Grease filled die.

  • lkeigwinlkeigwin Posts: 16,196 ✭✭✭✭✭

    We call it grease-filled but the truth is the grease wasn't an oily blob.

    Grease, combined with metal shavings and other residue, formed a very hard substance that got substantially harder with each successive strike. Eventually it fell away. But while it was there it prevented devices from striking-up.
    Lance.

  • rickoricko Posts: 79,051 ✭✭✭✭✭

    J_H_B ... There are a lot of terms and slang associated with coin collecting. It will take time, but you will see them here frequently. Somewhere there was a thread about it and listed acronyms and terms... you might try the search function. Your best bet is to get the Redbook... runs about $15 ... Has lots of terms explained and is a valuable reference for U.S. coins. Good luck, Cheers, RickO

  • WAYNEASWAYNEAS Posts: 734 ✭✭✭✭

    J_H_B said:

    @WAYNEAS said:

    J_H_B said:

    @WAYNEAS said:
    Welcome aboard.
    Is it a 2001 date?
    I'll say that the light date is due to die wear or the die becoming "filled in" with maybe grease or both.
    I am sure that you will get some better answers here in a short time.
    Keep up the roll searches.

    When the light shines on just right you can read "2000" I think maybe a D mint mark, its really hard to tell. I asked a local coin dealer about it and he said the date was probably rubbed off.

    Well if it is a 2000 date, the coin is a standard "close AM" type. The wide AM's are more desirable and a little harder to find. Notice in "America" that there is a space between the E and the M and the M almost touches the A. A wide AM has the M more evenly spaced towards the E. Keep up your searches.
    Next time you see your dealer, you can inform him of what and how this actually happened.

    Hum hum, interesting, now I wish it was a 2001! How fun!

    Thank you for the information, I'm really glad I joined this group. This is so much more enjoyable with other to talk to about it πŸ˜ƒ

    The info that I provided is for the 2000 coin and not the 2001.
    Other hard to find AM coins are: the 98 Wide AM, 98 S close AM, 99 Wide AM, 99 S close AM and again the 2000 Wide AM.
    Good luck in your search.

  • JRoccoJRocco Posts: 14,066 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @lkeigwin said:
    We call it grease-filled but the truth is the grease wasn't an oily blob.

    Grease, combined with metal shavings and other residue, formed a very hard substance that got substantially harder with each successive strike. Eventually it fell away. But while it was there it prevented devices from striking-up.
    Lance.

    For a newbie to better understand this imagine lifting the hood and looking at some of the gunk, that oily thick cruddy gunk in some of the corners of the engine. Mixture of grease and whatever buildup. Now imagine some of that getting between the planchet and the die during the strike. The result is what you see here, a strike thru β€œgrease”

    Some coins are just plain "Interesting"
  • tincuptincup Posts: 3,702 ✭✭✭✭

    Welcome to the forum. You came to the right place to get the answers to your coin collecting questions. There are many very experienced individuals on this forum.

    ----- kj
  • TwoSides2aCoinTwoSides2aCoin Posts: 41,936 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited January 14, 2021 11:09AM

    BTW, being struck through just about everything else ( wire, cloth, debris) results in a greater value for the coin. Go figure.

  • WAYNEASWAYNEAS Posts: 734 ✭✭✭✭

    Here is a 2020 wide AM I found in a roll search a while back

  • _J_H_B__J_H_B_ Posts: 10 ✭

    Okay that makes a lot of sense. I wasn't quite understanding how grease could do that. But now I get it if it mixed with other stuff and then blocked the press.

    Interesting, thank you everyone for the information πŸ˜„

  • abcde12345abcde12345 Posts: 3,095 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Jimnight said:
    Grease filled die.

    <3

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