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Estimated value of these wheat cent errors?

Ik their condition overall is not great but I haven’t had much luck finding anything about these on a check list etc. 1929-s bottom part of “e” in one is minted behind it and the “u” in United on 1956 coin is actually a “v”. But yes.. thank you


Comments

  • silverpopsilverpop Posts: 4,987 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited February 5, 2020 10:30PM

    not sure the photos for one aren't clear enough to make out anything

    7/27/75

    https://colin-dickerson.imgbb.com/albums

    23 yrs to my brown eyed princess on 8/11/97

    the worst foe lies within the self

  • yspsalesyspsales Posts: 593 ✭✭✭✭

    About 2 cents...

    Spend your time more wisely.

    You are not learning anything and wasting time with the process you are employing.

    There is an old saying... "Buy the book before the coin."

    Buy the latest two editions of the Cherry Pickers Guide to Rare Die Varieties by Bill Fivaz.

    Then you are free to search the unlimited amount of ebay listings across a broad spectrum of series and years.

    Comes with pictures and notes about each coin. You can also use PCGS images for better resolution.

    Buy the book!

  • JBKJBK Posts: 7,551 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited February 6, 2020 6:04AM

    The top one could be a lamination. Not sure.

    The bottom one has post mint damage to the U.

    And you are still holding your coins wrong. Only hold them by the edges.

  • 291fifth291fifth Posts: 19,174 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Why are you wasting your time with stuff like this? The coins you show have minimal or no numismatic premium.
    Forget about finding your fortune in pocket change. That era came to an end in 1963.

    All glory is fleeting.
  • OldhoopsterOldhoopster Posts: 1,171 ✭✭✭✭✭

    First coin is a lamination error. Cool find, but it looks like it's been cleaned and has some environmental damage. It would be difficult to find someone who would pay more than the 2-3 cents you would get for common wheats. I would keep it if I found it, but many others wouldn't bother.

    Second coins is damaged

    Contrary to what the the "Get Rich From Pocket Change" YouTube hacks say, the chances of finding an error that you could sell for a buck or two is pretty slim. Stay away from them! You really need to learn about the minting process in order to find errors. The more you know, the easier it will be to spot real errors and avoid the junk. Don't worry about the value until you know it's an error. And even then, most errors you find will be minor and only worth a minor premium at best.

    Member of the ANA since 1982
  • astroratastrorat Posts: 8,618 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The 1929-S is a lamination (really a delamination) error and is fairly common.

    The 1956-P had post-mint damage (PMD).

    Numismatist Ordinaire
    See http://www.doubledimes.com for a free online reference for US twenty-cent pieces
  • JimnightJimnight Posts: 6,459 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Nice pics

  • rickoricko Posts: 75,429 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Nice pictures... You have a delamination and post mint damage...as stated above. No numismatic premium. Cheers, RickO

  • TreashuntTreashunt Posts: 5,080 ✭✭✭✭✭

    1: lamination, tiny added value, like 1 cent

    2) damage

    Frank

    BHNC #203

  • BuffaloIronTailBuffaloIronTail Posts: 4,640 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Jimnight said:
    Nice pics

    Nice pics

    Pete

    "I tell them there's no problems.....only solutions" - John Lennon
  • silverpopsilverpop Posts: 4,987 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited February 6, 2020 7:06AM

    pocket change will never make you rich, maybe there are some cool finds in change but not many nowadays, also most here do know their coins, plus make the photos clear, do up close shots of the areas you want us to look at or see and always either lay the coins down or hold them by the edges when taking photos

    7/27/75

    https://colin-dickerson.imgbb.com/albums

    23 yrs to my brown eyed princess on 8/11/97

    the worst foe lies within the self

  • SmudgeSmudge Posts: 5,681 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The get rich quick on pocket change sites online are misleading at best.

  • shorecollshorecoll Posts: 5,333 ✭✭✭✭✭

    One contrary note, in the 60's and 70's, hundreds of thousands of people checked their pocket change. Even with the sleazy hype, significantly fewer people are checking today, so when crooks or unknowing relatives (or both) dump grandpa's coins back in to circulation I'd postulate that the chances of finding stuff are better than they have been in the past. About 5 years ago my sister got a F-12 Barber quarter in change.

    ANA-LM, NBS, EAC
  • jedmjedm Posts: 1,871 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Maserati27 - I agree with what @shorecoll is saying about the crooks and or relatives putting coins back in circulation. I buy change from the bank to be used as change in a retail store. I am fairly certain that the only time I have ever found either a war nickel or mercury dime, or older silver quarter it has not been handed to me by a customer but came directly from a roll from the bank, and these occasions are few and very far between. I have seen a fair amount of nice uncirculated early '60s nickels in our nickel rolls. When I come across a really nice America the Beautiful quarter from these rolls I have set them aside to someday go thru and fill an album. I see many - lots and lots of state quarters that are uncirculated and almost 20 years old in the quarter rolls. Imho it's interesting and fun keeping an eye out, but I don't go out of my way very far to search for stuff.

  • topstuftopstuf Posts: 14,723 ✭✭✭✭✭

    :D

    ....Monetary Artifact Researcher.... B)

  • SonorandesertratSonorandesertrat Posts: 5,441 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @shorecoll said:
    One contrary note, in the 60's and 70's, hundreds of thousands of people checked their pocket change. Even with the sleazy hype, significantly fewer people are checking today, so when crooks or unknowing relatives (or both) dump grandpa's coins back in to circulation I'd postulate that the chances of finding stuff are better than they have been in the past. About 5 years ago my sister got a F-12 Barber quarter in change.

    When I was living in northern Utah, near the Idaho border, in the 1996-2006 period, I repeatedly received silver coins in change, and occasionally a Buffalo nickel. I always thought that kids were raiding caches of obsolete coins saved by their parents/grandparents.

    Member: EAC, NBS, C4, CWTS, ANA

    RMR: 'Wer, wenn ich schriee, hörte mich denn aus der Engel Ordnungen?'

    CJ: 'No one!' [Ain't no angels in the coin biz]
  • BillDugan1959BillDugan1959 Posts: 3,827 ✭✭✭✭✭

    People who drive Maseratis don't waste time messing with low-end poor condition pennies.

  • 291fifth291fifth Posts: 19,174 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I haven't found a coin in change that had any significant numismatic value in over 40 years.

    All glory is fleeting.
  • Maserati27Maserati27 Posts: 121 ✭✭✭

    Alright thank you guys I appreciate it

  • Maserati27Maserati27 Posts: 121 ✭✭✭

    The only coin I found that apparently was valuable was a 1867 flying eagle but as cool as I thought I found it it’s worth 5-8$ lol. So yeah I gotta realize its going to be very hard to find something great. But pcgs coins like that are good condition 1958 etc how come some go for $100+? Is it Bc they get them graded?

  • joeykoinsjoeykoins Posts: 6,032 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Oldhoopster said:
    First coin is a lamination error. Cool find, but it looks like it's been cleaned and has some environmental damage. It would be difficult to find someone who would pay more than the 2-3 cents you would get for common wheats. I would keep it if I found it, but many others wouldn't bother.

    Second coins is damaged

    Contrary to what the the "Get Rich From Pocket Change" YouTube hacks say, the chances of finding an error that you could sell for a buck or two is pretty slim. Stay away from them! You really need to learn about the minting process in order to find errors. The more you know, the easier it will be to spot real errors and avoid the junk. Don't worry about the value until you know it's an error. And even then, most errors you find will be minor and only worth a minor premium at best.

    You are right in the majority of your post but there still is that possibility one can find a nice error/variety coin in the wild. Even a key coin. Sure, most unlikely but still possible. I for one, won't ever give up.
    I do know your post is trying to help the OP by stopping and wasting the time. You are right, in the sense the OP should concentrate on big and better things. This is what makes this hobby so great. The vast amount of areas one can go to have fun in coin collecting! :)

    "Jesus died for you and for me, Thank you,Jesus"!!!

    --- If it should happen I die and leave this world and you want to remember me. Please only remember my opening Sig Line.
  • OldhoopsterOldhoopster Posts: 1,171 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @joeykoins said:

    @Oldhoopster said:
    First coin is a lamination error. Cool find, but it looks like it's been cleaned and has some environmental damage. It would be difficult to find someone who would pay more than the 2-3 cents you would get for common wheats. I would keep it if I found it, but many others wouldn't bother.

    Second coins is damaged

    Contrary to what the the "Get Rich From Pocket Change" YouTube hacks say, the chances of finding an error that you could sell for a buck or two is pretty slim. Stay away from them! You really need to learn about the minting process in order to find errors. The more you know, the easier it will be to spot real errors and avoid the junk. Don't worry about the value until you know it's an error. And even then, most errors you find will be minor and only worth a minor premium at best.

    You are right in the majority of your post but there still is that possibility one can find a nice error/variety coin in the wild. Even a key coin. Sure, most unlikely but still possible. I for one, won't ever give up.
    I do know your post is trying to help the OP by stopping and wasting the time. You are right, in the sense the OP should concentrate on big and better things. This is what makes this hobby so great. The vast amount of areas one can go to have fun in coin collecting! :)

    Yeah, and there is a chance that you can win the lottery too.

    BTW: I'm not sure what part of my post you disagree with? I never said you couldn't find something in change, and I never said people shouldn't search through change. I'm just trying to give the OP some realistic expectations.

    Member of the ANA since 1982
  • jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 13,350 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Maserati27 said:
    The onl ow come some go for $100+? Is it Bc they get them graded?

    A "good condition" 1958 goes for 3 cents. An EXTREMELY HIGH GRADE example goes for $100s. Why? Because they are scarce in those high grades and impossible to find roll searching. Coins banging around in change do not end up as MS68s.

    High values go with top pop coins where they are rare in that condition. Common condition coins go for comparatively very little: 3 cents for wheats and 1 cent for memorials.

  • JBKJBK Posts: 7,551 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Maserati27 said:
    But pcgs coins like that are good condition 1958 etc how come some go for $100+? Is it Bc they get them graded?

    Some people might disagree with me but as I see it, getting a coin graded does not increase its value. It makes it more marketable or saleable, which I suppose could help you maximize the $ or at least get a quicker sale, but the grade and inherent value do not go up because a coin is in a slab.

    As for the price differences you see for modern coins, the valuable versions are "condition rarities" - coins that are very common and have no added value in lower grades but are very rare in very high grades. And the chance of pulling a very high grade out of circulation is pretty nonexistent.

  • divecchiadivecchia Posts: 5,713 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Maserati27 said:
    The only coin I found that apparently was valuable was a 1867 flying eagle but as cool as I thought I found it it’s worth 5-8$ lol. So yeah I gotta realize its going to be very hard to find something great. But pcgs coins like that are good condition 1958 etc how come some go for $100+? Is it Bc they get them graded?

    The answer is, not just because they get them graded, but because they grade a very high grade like MS68RD.

    Donato

    Hobbyist & Collector (not an investor).
    Nolan Ryan Master Set ---- Nolan Ryan Topps Master Set
  • yspsalesyspsales Posts: 593 ✭✭✭✭

    Focus your search on common dates you can find in pocket change... ignore the rest.

    1992, 1998, 1999, 2000... have reverse errors
    1983, 1984, 1995, 1995d... have double died varieties

    Buy the book!

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