White metal tokens and medals....Post them here

coinsarefuncoinsarefun Posts: 17,596 ✭✭✭✭✭

Sometimes they really don't receive much respect but I collect them for the amazing history behind them.
This one is from the Williamson Building in the late 1800's in Cleveland, Ohio. I'm from there and can never say no when I see a nice inexpensive white metal token. This is the size of a silver dollar.
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If anyone wants to post their white metal tokens or medals, please post them. There are many so-called dollars also.
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The WILLIAMSON BUILDING, which stood on Public Square, served as the monumental gateway to Euclid Ave. for over 80 years. This 17-story building was begun in April 1899, and was ready for occupancy on 1 April 1900. It was the tallest building in the city when constructed. It replaced an earlier, 4-story Williamson Bldg. on the site which had been built 1889-90 and damaged by fire in 1895. Both stood on the site of the old Samuel Williamson homestead.
Horse drawn wagons and pedestrians occupied the streets in this image of the building in 1910

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Comments

  • rickoricko Posts: 63,649 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Wow... built in a year... from start to occupancy.... Amazing... would not happen today.. between ridiculous regulations, permits and graft, that would take a minimum of five years. Beautiful medal though... Thanks Stef.. I do like it... Cheers, RickO

  • coinsarefuncoinsarefun Posts: 17,596 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Thanks @ricko I was amused with the idea it was built in a year too. Nowadays I'm happy to built a 6
    unit townhome complex in 12-15 month's :D

  • OuthaulOuthaul Posts: 6,078 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The metal type is what precipitates the disrespect. True medal collectors appreciate ALL medals where others who just dabble in them tend to go for the gold, silver, and bronze.

    Just my eversohumble observation.

    Never take a front row seat at a Bris.
    Proud recipient and founding member of the "YOU SUCK" Club since 8/31/04 - USAF Retired: 1974 - 1994

  • coinsarefuncoinsarefun Posts: 17,596 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Outhaul said:
    The metal type is what precipitates the disrespect. True medal collectors appreciate ALL medals where others who just dabble in them tend to go for the gold, silver, and bronze.

    Just my eversohumble observation.

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    I do agree with that statement. Plus white metal is often plagued with pits and spots if not preserved well.
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    There are quite a few rare white metal pieces that range from political as I'm showing now and many
    Merchant's.
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    1864 CAMPAIGN DEWITT-AL-1864-3, WM ABRAHAM LINCOLN EX. JOHN J. FORD JR.
    Very rare perhaps 4-6 known.
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  • aus3000tinaus3000tin Posts: 359 ✭✭✭

    @ricko said:
    Wow... built in a year... from start to occupancy.... Amazing... would not happen today.. between ridiculous regulations, permits and graft, that would take a minimum of five years. Beautiful medal though... Thanks Stef.. I do like it... Cheers, RickO

    Probably NO indoor plumbing, NO electricity, definitely NO fire sprinklers , etc.
    So I can a 17 story (only 7 floors from the photo that I count) building being built in a year's time.

    Stories are NOT the number of floors but a length of height equivalant to 10 feet.

    I do like the coin.

    Is it aluminum ?

    Chris

  • GluggoGluggo Posts: 2,169 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I am pretty sure these are white medal but to tired to pull them out and certify.

  • numismagramnumismagram Posts: 53 ✭✭✭

    Here's an exceedingly rare George Washington white metal Penny Token for Chapter 25 of Akron, OH...




    And a lustrous white metal Medal commemorating Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee...




    And lastly, in a similar vein, an architectural aluminum Medal from Sweden for the 1896 Nordic Industrial and Craft Exhibition in Malmö...

    Jeremy Bostwick

    For exceptional works of medallic art, check out our current inventory at Numismagram!

  • EXOJUNKIEEXOJUNKIE Posts: 1,157 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Here are a couple of politicals.

    I'm addicted to exonumia ... it is numismatic crack!

    ANA LM

    30+ years of active military service and still going!
  • keetskeets Posts: 20,208 ✭✭✭✭✭

    True medal collectors appreciate ALL medals where others who just dabble in them tend to go for the gold, silver, and bronze

    while this is true in part it overlooks the problems mentioned by coinsarefun, pits and spots among others. White Metal which is typically Tin, Pewter or Pot Metal was cheaper. with the problems the alloy sufferers from it didn't fare well over the years and left much of what was struck either cloudy or suffering from black spots, commonly called Tin Pest. given the choice of such a medal or one struck in (usually)lower numbers that look much nicer, most collectors will choose the latter.

    it's interesting to note that even at the WCE in 1892-3 that Aluminum was still prohibitively expensive, moreso than even Silver.

    I have several White Metal SC$'s which are R-6+ mainly because they are available and priced reasonably. other same design alloy types just aren't as likely to be found and when they do, bidding is more heated. my hunch is that other Exonumia collectors understand the things mentioned above.




    image
  • Namvet69Namvet69 Posts: 2,073 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I am always on the lookout for off metal pieces in great shape. They are out there lounging around and hiding with exonumia and trinkets. Nice looking items for sure. The hunt continues. Peace Roy

  • coinsarefuncoinsarefun Posts: 17,596 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I did forget to mention that mine must be aluminum because it is very light compared to other regular white metal that I have. It’s also crazy to think aluminum once was the most expensive metal in the world during the 1800’s. Double the price of gold.
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    Very nice pieces posted here.

  • ElemintElemint Posts: 510 ✭✭✭✭

    I'm not sure if this is 'White Metal" or not but I like the design and the symbolism. I had two at one point, lost one and found this 3 years later on the bay. MS69 for sure!

  • QCCoinGuyQCCoinGuy Posts: 191 ✭✭✭

    I picked this one up a few months ago. More information here:


    Working on a new website.
    Check it out if you have moment.

  • BroadstruckBroadstruck Posts: 28,240 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Gluggo said:
    I am pretty sure these are white medal but to tired to pull them out and certify.

    Your "I Take The Responsibility" HT-70 hard times token is Copper.

    To Err Is Human.... To Collect Err's Is Just Too Much Darn Tootin Fun!
  • QE GuyQE Guy Posts: 13 ✭✭

  • coinsarefuncoinsarefun Posts: 17,596 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Well, an unexpected amount of white metal have been posted here.....I love it, thanks everyone.
    @QE Guy really nice and quite rare too.
    @QCCoinGuy I love the medal and love the history......thanks for posting it.
    @CommemKing I always liked that one, thanks
    @keets nice ones
    @Gluggo yours is copper as @Broadstruck mentioned.
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    .Let keep them coming

  • BroadstruckBroadstruck Posts: 28,240 ✭✭✭✭✭

    1876 Stephen F. Whitman & Sons, Chocolatier, Philadelphia, PA, 23mm Diameter, White Metal.

    This pictorial token has a reversible die design which shows a smiling & frowning face.

    It's unique as a unlisted variety which was never documented by Benjamin Wright, Edgar Adams. Donald Miller, or Russell Rulau.


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    In 1842, a 19-year-old Quaker named Stephen F. Whitman set up a small "confectionery and fruiterer shoppe" on Market Street near the Philadelphia waterfront. His shop attracted Philadelphians from all walks of life, leading citizens to sailors. Thanks to exotic ingredients taken to Whitman by well-traveled sailors, his candies quickly gained renown across the Northeast.

    Whitman was an innovative marketer; he knew that presentation could be as important as taste to some customers. So he created beautiful packaging and well-crafted advertising campaigns that focused prospective customers on the quality of his candies. Whitman's became a familiar name, thanks to ads in newspapers and magazines as early as 1857.

    Business thrived, and the company's facility in Philadelphia expanded. New products, including tinned Instantaneous Chocolate, brought acclaim and boosted profits. In 1869, the next generation took the reins when Horace Whitman replaced his father as company president. Horace introduced America to cellophane, a then-wondrous material that helped keep candy fresh, colorful and clean.

    By 1907, Whitman's Candies were appearing on the shelves in "better drug stores" across the region. Four years later, Walter Sharp stepped in as president; he developed new products and initiated the company's money-back guarantee that continues to this day. Sharp also created the Whitman's Sampler®, an assortment of the company's best-selling chocolates. Inspired by a cross-stitched sampler hanging in his home, Sharp worked with a skilled employee to create the sampler that's reproduced on Sampler boxes to this day. By 1915, the Sampler had become America's best-selling box of chocolates, a position it still holds today.

    The company has a long history of honoring servicemen and women. During World War I, the company began distributing chocolates to soldiers, another noble tradition the company continues today. Whitman's Candies survived the Great Depression without sacrificing quality, lowering prices, or reducing dealer profits. In fact, more magazine ads were run in the 1930s, at the height of the Depression, than at any other time in the company's history.

    Products and packaging evolved ... new products were added ... and the company continued to prosper. With the start of World War II, the company introduced the beautiful Land, Sea and Air Tins. Women working the candy lines added handwritten notes to packages sent to soldiers; some of those notes results in long-term friendships and in a few cases, marriage.

    Refrigerated display cases in 1946 enabled dealers to store fresh candy longer. After WWII, Hollywood's brightest stars promoted Whitman's Candies, often in exchange for payment in chocolate and a mention of the star's latest movie.

    As America became more health-conscious, the company introduced Light Chocolates in 1984, Sugar Free candies in 2001, and the Net Carb line in 2003. In 2005, Whitman's partnered with Weight Watchers International® to produce a line of Weight Watchers Chocolates.

    Consumers continue to recognize Whitman's as one of a handful of brands that have stood the test of time, a true sampler of American ideals and values. It is fitting, then, that American presidents offer Whitman's Samplers to guests at the White House and those traveling on Air Force One.

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    To Err Is Human.... To Collect Err's Is Just Too Much Darn Tootin Fun!
  • ConnecticoinConnecticoin Posts: 10,935 ✭✭✭✭

    All those coins in NGC prong holders might want to cross them to PCGS

  • coinsarefuncoinsarefun Posts: 17,596 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Connecticoin That is a fantastic piece!!
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    All I have is a Fantasy die trial struck by Ron Landis at Gallery Mint Museum
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  • BillJonesBillJones Posts: 27,130 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited February 11, 2019 12:00PM

    Barnum’s New York City museum token. This piece was struck in England. This piece is made of silver plated white metal.


    19th century view of the building.

    The building as it burned. Confederate spies set it on fire during the Civil War, but that was not the blaze that did it in.

    Retired dealer and avid collector of U.S. type coins, 19th century presidential campaign medalets and selected medals. In recent years I have been working on a set of British coins - at least one coin from each king or queen who issued pieces that are collectible.
  • WillieBoyd2WillieBoyd2 Posts: 3,657 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I have had this token since the mid 1960's and have not been able to identify it or the Colonial Fund, except that it is not the current one.

    image
    Colonial Fund 51st Anniversary
    White metal, 37 mm, 18.52 gm

    Obverse:
    THE COLONIAL FUND INC.
    51ST. ANNIVERSARY YEAR
    THIS IS NOT A PROSPECTUS

    Reverse:
    IDLE DOLLARS EARN NO INCOME
    THE COLONIAL FUND INC.
    OVER 50 YEARS INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT EXPERIENCE
    COLONIAL DISTRIBUTORS INC.

    :)

    http://www.brianrxm.com
    The Mysterious Egyptian Magic Coin
    Coins in Movies and Coins on Television
    The San Francisco 1949 Mexico 1898 Peso Restrike


  • RegulatedRegulated Posts: 2,965 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The popular Betts-614A medal:

    (I love beating a dead horse).

    David McCarthy - Kagin's - IG: X_COINNERD_X

    What is now proved was once only imagined. - William Blake
  • ZoinsZoins Posts: 17,398 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited February 12, 2019 4:36AM

    @Connecticoin said:
    All those coins in NGC prong holders might want to cross them to PCGS

    White metal is very soft so it's much better stored without prongs.

    Unfortunately the damage is done for many pieces but, thanks to @Broadstruck, NGC will now use prongless holders for white metal.

    Would this be a candidate for Coin Restoration Services:

    https://crsstockton.com/

  • ZoinsZoins Posts: 17,398 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited February 13, 2019 8:03PM

    John Quinn Civil War store card by William Henry Bridgens in white metal. It's a R8 with 2 in MS63 and 1 in MS64.

  • ZoinsZoins Posts: 17,398 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited February 13, 2019 8:14PM

    This one isn't mine but I just noticed that Steve Hayden also handled a MS63 of my token above.

    Given that only 3 specimens of this token are known, what are the chances that Hayden has also handled the 3rd specimen?

  • GluggoGluggo Posts: 2,169 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Broadstruck said:

    @Gluggo said:
    I am pretty sure these are white medal but to tired to pull them out and certify.

    Your "I Take The Responsibility" HT-70 hard times token is Copper.

    Thank you for that, your correct a HT-70. I guess the color fooled me, but here is one.

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