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Artificially Toned Gold

Wahoo554Wahoo554 Posts: 1,086 ✭✭✭✭✭

I really like toned gold. I’ve read several recent discussions regarding artificially toned silver and am wondering if anybody has any insight concerning artificially toned gold. If anybody has any good photos of AT gold, iodine or otherwise please share.

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    SmudgeSmudge Posts: 9,254 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Go with patina.

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    Wahoo554Wahoo554 Posts: 1,086 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Smudge said:
    Go with patina.

    Is there a definitional difference between patina and toning? I understand that pure gold does not tone in the manner that silver does, but that as RickO pointed out, the copper elements can tarnish. I see countless images of beautiful CAC certified gold coins with dark or orange toning that I understand may have been imparted by a wood cabinet or a leather pouch. Is that coloration merely the product of certain substances adhering to the gold over time rather than an actual chemical reaction taking place?

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    jwittenjwitten Posts: 5,076 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I've seen a few .999 gold coins from the US mint get purple spots. Not sure how that happens. I happen to love toned gold (most of them at least). Seems to be a hit or miss thing on this board though.

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    SmudgeSmudge Posts: 9,254 ✭✭✭✭✭

    While I love toned gold some suspect it is at. Patina is safe from that and attractive. Old gold should not look like shiny brass imo.

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    Insider2Insider2 Posts: 14,452 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 26, 2018 9:05AM

    Many of the alterations are sold as "dirty gold." IMO they are ugly and hundreds were sent in to be conserved before the "dirty gold" fad kicked in a while back. It is just like toning. Decades ago you couldn't find a tarnished silver coin, now they are probably 40% of the market. Give the buyers what they want is a very good way to generate profits. :)

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    No HeadlightsNo Headlights Posts: 2,039 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Thanks for the educational post Bill.
    Great stuff

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    HemisphericalHemispherical Posts: 9,370 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @BillJones said:
    Here are the photos I promised to post for you.

    This 1891-CC half eagle was treated with iodine. I bought this piece thinking it was "crusty." It was "crusty," but the crust was iodine with flakes of it showing under a 10X glass. I didn't catch on to the problem until about a year after I had owned it.

    I sent this piece to PCGS to for a review. They agreed that the piece has been treated. They offered to remove the iodine and pay me a settlement, or buy the piece from me outright. I chose to sell it to PCGS. Two big thumbs up to PCGS for backing their product. B)

    The original grade was MS-62. After the iodine was removed the grade was MS-61.


    Thanks @BillJones I need to remember and check the gold.

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    slider23slider23 Posts: 638 ✭✭✭✭

    @BillJones said:
    Here are the photos I promised to post for you.

    This 1891-CC half eagle was treated with iodine. I bought this piece thinking it was "crusty." It was "crusty," but the crust was iodine with flakes of it showing under a 10X glass. I didn't catch on to the problem until about a year after I had owned it.

    I sent this piece to PCGS to for a review. They agreed that the piece has been treated. They offered to remove the iodine and pay me a settlement, or buy the piece from me outright. I chose to sell it to PCGS. Two big thumbs up to PCGS for backing their product. B)

    Bill, from photo is there any way to tell crusty vs iodine? Or is a loupe needed to check for iodine flakes?

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    BillJonesBillJones Posts: 33,484 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 26, 2018 8:21AM

    Flakes are one factor. The 1891-CC $5 gold had them. Also if the color looks "painted on" and not into the surface, that's a problem. Coppery toning is IN the coin; it's not just on the surface. That waht's having a coin processed to remove copper spots is often a waste of money. In a year or so there is good chance that they will return.

    Retired dealer and avid collector of U.S. type coins, 19th century presidential campaign medalets and selected medals. In recent years I have been working on a set of British coins - at least one coin from each king or queen who issued pieces that are collectible. I am also collecting at least one coin for each Roman emperor from Julius Caesar to ... ?
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    Insider2Insider2 Posts: 14,452 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @slider23 asked: "...is there any way to tell crusty vs iodine? Or is a loupe needed to check for iodine flakes?

    I've not seen an iodine flake in my life. Maybe the iodine discolored some debris on the coin. Perhaps "iodine residue" might convey the look a little better. :wink:

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    ashelandasheland Posts: 22,693 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I love that crusty look when it's original.

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    HillbillyCollectorHillbillyCollector Posts: 515 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited April 2, 2024 9:37PM

    ****MISTAKE*******
    Posted in wrong thread.

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