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Amazing Patterns

ZoinsZoins Posts: 33,811 ✭✭✭✭✭
edited November 11, 2018 5:41PM in U.S. Coin Forum

Patterns are rare and pricey so they don't often come up in discussion.

This thread is for any pattern that you appreciate.

Here are some I've recently ran across that I thought were worth posting:

J-A1915-3 Copper Panama-Pacific PCGS SP65RD pop 1/0 unique

This is a unique 60mm copper hub trial. It was owned by Anthony Swiatek who purchased it from Sol Kaplan, and it was possibly in the Virgil Brand collection earlier. It sold for $99,875.00 in the Swiatek sale at 2015 FUN.

Links:

J-1962/P-2030 Copper Panama-Pacific No-S Half Dollar NGC PR66+* RB CAC pop 1/0

This is Eric's example and is the finest known. It was sold by Heritage in 2013 for $199,750.00.

Known examples include:

  • NGC PR66+* RB - Eric Pfeiffer Newman
  • NGC PR65 RB - Abe Kosoff, Bob Simpson
  • PCGS PR63 BN - Benjamin Maximillian "B. Max" Mehl

Links include:

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Comments

  • MrEurekaMrEureka Posts: 23,820 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 11, 2018 3:26AM

    Splashers and Hub Trials are indexed separately.

    The $50 is here:

    uspatterns.stores.yahoo.net/p3548.html

    Andy Lustig

    Doggedly collecting coins of the Central American Republic.

    Visit the Society of US Pattern Collectors at USPatterns.com.
  • specialistspecialist Posts: 956 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I placed the only 2 sets know for the Pan Pac 50C-Silver, copper, and gold! I still get asked today about having my customer sell them.

  • MrEurekaMrEureka Posts: 23,820 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @specialist said:
    I placed the only 2 sets know for the Pan Pac 50C-Silver, copper, and gold! I still get asked today about having my customer sell them.

    Did they both go to the same client?

    Andy Lustig

    Doggedly collecting coins of the Central American Republic.

    Visit the Society of US Pattern Collectors at USPatterns.com.
  • morgansforevermorgansforever Posts: 8,425 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The J-1609 (Schoolgirl) is my favorite and the J-1590 (Washlady) is my second favorite pattern.

    World coins FSHO Hundreds of successful BST transactions U.S. coins FSHO
  • coinsarefuncoinsarefun Posts: 21,662 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Well @zoins you pretty much nailed the coolest ones that I would like.....lol
    Also, that are a few trade dollar atterns that are also stunning

  • rickoricko Posts: 98,724 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Very impressive...Items such as these must have been brought out of the mint initially and tightly held ever since then....Cheers, RickO

  • LakesammmanLakesammman Posts: 17,243 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Nice! :+1:

    Sure would like to see a pic of the 3 piece set, especially the gold.

    "My friends who see my collection sometimes ask what something costs. I tell them and they are in awe at my stupidity." (Baccaruda, 12/03).I find it hard to believe that he (Trump) rushed to some hotel to meet girls of loose morals, although ours are undoubtedly the best in the world. (Putin 1/17) Gone but not forgotten. IGWT, Speedy, Bear, BigE, HokieFore, John Burns, Russ, TahoeDale, Dahlonega, Astrorat, Stewart Blay, Oldhoopster, Broadstruck, Ricko.
  • CaptHenwayCaptHenway Posts: 31,429 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Wowzer!

    Numismatist. 50 year member ANA. Winner of four ANA Heath Literary Awards; three Wayte and Olga Raymond Literary Awards; Numismatist of the Year Award 2009, and Lifetime Achievement Award 2020. Winner numerous NLG Literary Awards.
  • ZoinsZoins Posts: 33,811 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I added a bit more information on the 1915 Copper Pan Pac half in the OP, including other known specimens and links to descriptions Heritage, Newman Numismatic Portal and USPatterns.com. Slowing trying to assemble and link to more information on these great pieces.

  • specialistspecialist Posts: 956 ✭✭✭✭✭

    No Andy, my longest customer whom I built complete Comment set for including proofs and the Lincoln Pattern has one group-and of course Mr Simpson has the other.

    I own the Copper PCGS PR67 RB

  • ZoinsZoins Posts: 33,811 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited December 13, 2020 3:50PM

    Great to know Laura.

    Here's some updated info on PCGS MS67RB and MS66RB.

    J-1962/P-2030 Copper Panama-Pacific No-S Half Dollar - PCGS PR67 RB pop 1/0 - Woodin-Swiatek-Sperber Specimen

    Here's the auction listing for the PCGS PR67 RB from Stack's for now (since you never know how long they will last before Stack's deletes them):

    https://auctions.stacksbowers.com/lots/view/3-52DZZ

    It mentions the following provenance:

    Provenance: Possibly ex Treasury Secretary W.G. McAdoo; William Woodin; B. Max Mehl's sale of the Fred E. Olsen Collection, November 1944, lot 625; Abe Kosoff and Sol Kaplan; purchased by Anthony Swiatek at a Shaker-Heights Coin Show in 1971; Heritage's FUN Signature Auction of January 2015, lot 4505.

    Since the provenance mentions Fred Olsen, is this the same coin as the PCGS PR63 Olsen specimen mentioned by Heritage in 2013?

    1. PR63 Brown PCGS. Fred E. Olsen Collection (B. Max Mehl, 11/1944), lot 625, realized $180; possibly Denver ANA (Heritage, 8/1996), lot 5193, realized $15,400.

    Here's the TrueView:

    J-1962/P-2030 Copper Panama-Pacific No-S Half Dollar - PCGS PR66 RB pop 1/1 - Newman-Simpson Specimen

    The Newman coin has since been crossed and is now in the Simpson collection as a PCGS PR66 RB non-CAC, previously NGC PR66+* RB CAC. Has Simpson sold off the Kosoff coin?

  • BaronVonBaughBaronVonBaugh Posts: 1,835 ✭✭✭✭

    I have a J208. It is a 1858 IHC. It looks just like the 1859 IHC. I like the patterns that were later adopted into regular coins.

  • specialistspecialist Posts: 956 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Mr Simpson has not sold any. The coin I own is like a stray out there.

  • ZoinsZoins Posts: 33,811 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 11, 2018 8:18PM

    Of note, the J-1962 PCGS PR67 RB and J-A1915-3 where both owned by Sol Kaplan and Anthony Swiatek. Both coins were picked up by Anthony Swiatek at a Shaker-Heights Coin Show in 1971 and held until 2015 FUN, being off the market for 41 years!

    At NGC, the Newman coin was on top at NGC PR66+* RB CAC with the Woodin-Swiatek coin second at NGC PR66 RB. Both crossed to PCGS and switched places with the Woodin-Swiatek-Sperber coin coming in at PCGS PR67 RB non-CAC and the Newman-Simpson coin coming in at PCGS PR66 RB non-CAC.

    Here is the Heritage listing for the Swiatek sale:

    Here's the list of known specimens from that listing:

    Roster of 1915 No S Panama-Pacific Half Dollars, Judd-1962
    1. PR66+ ★ Red and Brown NGC. Possibly Treasury Secretary W.G. McAdoo; unknown intermediaries; Eric P. Newman; Selections From the Eric P. Newman Collection, Part I (Heritage, 4/2013), lot 4048, realized $199,750.
    2. PR66 Red and Brown NGC. Possibly Treasury Secretary W.G. McAdoo; William Woodin; Fred E. Olsen Collection (B. Max Mehl, 11/1944), lot 625, realized $180; Abe Kosoff and Sol Kaplan; purchased by Anthony Swiatek at a Shaker-Heights Coin Show in 1971; the present coin.
    3. PR65 Red and Brown NGC. Possibly Treasury Secretary W.G. McAdoo; unknown intermediaries; Abe Kosoff; Saint Louis ANA (New England Rare Coin Auctions, 7/1979), lot 1363, offered with an example of Judd-1960 and Judd-1961 in separate lots, realized $5,000; Sound Beach Collection (Heritage, 11/2003), lot 11251, offered with the other coins from the 1979 ANA in separate lots, realized $63,250; Southern collection; Simpson Collection.

    Additional Appearances
    A. PR63 Brown PCGS. Denver ANA (Heritage, 8/1996), lot 5193, realized $15,400, possibly the same as number 3 above.
    B. Proof. A specimen exhibited by F.C.C. Boyd at the June 11, 1943 meeting of the New York Numismatic Club, per the July 1943 issue of The Numismatist, Page 559. This citation could represent any of the coins mentioned above. (NGC ID# 2AMH, PCGS# 72266)

  • RogerBRogerB Posts: 8,852 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 11, 2018 8:48PM

    Zerbe's suggestion that copper piece were made for Secretary McAdoo is, like much of other "stuff" - fantasy...repeated until it has the veneer of truth but none of the substance.

  • ZoinsZoins Posts: 33,811 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 11, 2018 9:31PM

    @RogerB said:
    Zerbe's suggestion that copper piece were made for Secretary McAdoo is, like much of other "stuff" - fantasy...repeated until it has the veneer of truth but none of the substance.

    Any thoughts on Virgil Brand possibly owning the Pan Pac octagonal hub trial?

  • ZoinsZoins Posts: 33,811 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 12, 2018 2:13AM

    The gold Pan Pac No-S half dollar is interesting, as the PCGS and HA information on this coin seems to have inconsistencies. Minimally, PCGS CoinFacts may be confusing.

    1. PCGS CoinFacts (http://www.pcgscoinfacts.com/Coin/Detail/12176) shows two sets of images for the two known specimens but closer inspection shows the photos to be of the same coin!
    2. PCGS CoinFacts and population now show a census 2 for PCGS PR64, but the description lists "PCGS PR64" for the Brand specimen and "PR63 estimated grade" for the Olsen specimen. In the HA descriptions, both were graded NGC PF64.

    HA identifies the Lemus specimen as the Olsen specimen and says that Simpson owned the Brand specimen (twice, in 2009 and 2010). PCGS cert verification and TrueView shows Simpson to own the Lemus collection coin now so it also appears that Simpson has owned both known specimens, the Olsen specimen and the Brand specimen? Or is this due to confusion with this piece?

    Here's the information from PCGS CoinFacts. The larger photos are below. Closer inspection shows they appear to be the same coin. Note:

    1. Five black dots above "P" in EXPOSITION
    2. One black dot in second "O" in EXPOSITION
    3. One black dot in "O" in DOLLAR
    4. Mark at end of "F" in HALF
    5. Subtle "Z" scratched under "T" in UNITED


    J1960 / P2031 Gold Pan-Pac No-S Half Dollar Olsen-Lemus Specimen NGC PF64 non-CAC

    It's useful to refer to this as the Lemus specimen because Heritage has 2 sets of photos that say "LEMUS COLLECTION" on the NGC slab insert.

    Here are Heritage's listings for the Olsen specimen:

    The census is given as the following. The difference between 2009 and 2010 is that in 2010's description, the Lemus Collection is added, which is interesting since the Lemus provenance is already on the slab in the 2009 auction.

    Census. Only two pieces are known.
    1. Fred E. Olsen Collection (B. Max Mehl, 11/1944), lot 1769, which realized an astounding $4,250; King Farouk; Palace Collections of Egypt (Sotheby's, 1954), lot 309; Norweb Collection (Bowers and Merena, 11/1988), lot 3307; Lemus Collection (Heritage, 1/2009), lot 1962, where it brought $345,000. PR64 NGC. The present specimen.
    2. Virgil Brand; Burdette G. Johnson; Celina Coin Co.; A. Friedman; ANA (New England Rare Coin Auctions, 7/1979), lot 1365; Sound Beach Collection (Heritage, 11/2003), lot 11252, which brought $165,000.85; Southern Collection; Simpson Collection. PR64 NGC.

    The other interesting thing is that the Brand specimen is listed as being owned by Simpson but PCGS shows the Olsen specimen as pedigreed to Simpson now so both coins have been in the Simson collection. So, it seems at least at one point, Simpson owned each known specimen.

    J1960 / P2031 Gold Pan-Pac No-S Half Dollar Brand-Simpson Specimen PCGS PR64 non-CAC

    Here are Heritage's listings for the Brand specimen:

    The auction is from 2003 so the photos are that great and they are older, however, it appears possible that this coin is different than the Olsen coin from the HA photos. I didn't embed them here because I don't feel like doing Photoshop right now but might do it later. For now, follow the HA link.

    PCGS CoinFacts says PCGS 31672697 is the Brand-Simpson specimen, graded PCGS PR64. The TrueView is below.

    Differences seem to be:

    1. HA Brand specimen is missing the tell-tale spots in the later Olsen photos: Five black dots above "P" in EXPOSITION, One black dot in second "O" in EXPOSITION
    2. HA Brand specimen has dark areas under "C" in PACIFIC, "R" in DOLLAR, and a dark line through 7 o'clock for "O" in DOLLAR.

    Mystery

    So, if the CoinFacts photos are of the same coin, which coin is it?

    • HA says their 2009 and 2010 photos are the Olsen specimen
    • PCGS says their TrueView of 31672697 is the Brand specimen
    • HA says their 2003 photos are the Brand specimen

    If the HA photos are to be believed, did PCGS mistakenly attributed the TrueView of PCGS 31672697 to the Brand specimen when it is actually the Olsen-Lemus specimen?

    Or, are the two photos in PCGS CoinFacts supposed to be both of the Olsen-Lemus specimen which has been regraded to PCGS PR64? And that there is supposed to be no photo of the Brand specimen even though the grades would seem to give that impression. In this case, both Olsen and Brand specimens would have found their way to Simpson.

  • RogerBRogerB Posts: 8,852 ✭✭✭✭✭

    No thoughts about Brand. Are his collection inventories in ANS?

  • 2ltdjorn2ltdjorn Posts: 2,329 ✭✭✭✭

    Good information

    WTB... errors, New Orleans gold, and circulated 20th key date coins!
  • ZoinsZoins Posts: 33,811 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited December 2, 2018 11:12PM

    Thought it was worth listing the Gilt Half Unions as they are certainly some amazing patterns. Here are two with TrueViews, one from Simpson and another from Farouk.

    1877 Gilt Half Union - Judd-1549 - Simpson - PCGS PR64 - Pop 1/0

    1877 Gilt Half Union - Judd-1549 - Farouk - PCGS PR63 - pop 3/1

    Given the 2015 and 2014 Heritage Auctions, provenance, scratch behind the hair bun and discoloration by the first start on the obverse, they appear to be the same coin, indicating that this coin is now NGC PF63+ and no longer a PCGS PR63.

  • ZoinsZoins Posts: 33,811 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited December 4, 2018 11:09PM

    Here's a unique piece that is being offered by Heritage. Wonder if Simpson will pick it up?

    (1857) Double Eagle Reverse Die Trial - J-A1857-9, Unique Copper Striking - Garrett - MS64 RB

    Anthony Paquet indicates this die trial is unique in a letter to Lewis Hayden dated May 3, 1877:

    At your request I will state that the impression on a copper planchet from the reverse die for the twenty dollar gold piece, showing eagle and star, presented to you by me, is the only impression ever struck from said die. The die was engraved by myself about the year 1861, as a pattern, and not having been accepted it was, by direction of the Director of the U.S. Mint, destroyed by me personally after this impression had been taken.

    Heritage indicates it was last sold in the 1980 Garrett Part 2 sale for $9,000. If correct, it means this has been off the market for 38 years. It will be interesting to see where this ends up now.

    Ex: Lefferts Collection (Edward Cogan, 9/1878); Britton Collection (George Cogan, 1/1883); Garrett Collection, Part II (Bowers and Ruddy, 3/1980), lot 1095, where it sold for $9,000.

    Heritage image:

    CoinFacts image:

    Older USPatterns.com image:

  • RegulatedRegulated Posts: 2,983 ✭✭✭✭✭

    There are a couple US Assay Office die impressions on large copper planchets like that.

    David McCarthy - Kagin's - IG: X_COINNERD_X

    What is now proved was once only imagined. - William Blake
  • ZoinsZoins Posts: 33,811 ✭✭✭✭✭

    What is on top of the ribbon on Paquet's double eagle reverse? It looks like an apple or cherry to me.

  • CaptHenwayCaptHenway Posts: 31,429 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Zoins said:
    What is on top of the ribbon on Paquet's double eagle reverse? It looks like an apple or cherry to me.

    Just an extra curl to the ribbon.

    Numismatist. 50 year member ANA. Winner of four ANA Heath Literary Awards; three Wayte and Olga Raymond Literary Awards; Numismatist of the Year Award 2009, and Lifetime Achievement Award 2020. Winner numerous NLG Literary Awards.
  • ZoinsZoins Posts: 33,811 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @CaptHenway said:

    @Zoins said:
    What is on top of the ribbon on Paquet's double eagle reverse? It looks like an apple or cherry to me.

    Just an extra curl to the ribbon.

    Ah yes, I see that now. Too bad, I was hoping for something different with a story!

  • RogerBRogerB Posts: 8,852 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited December 3, 2018 9:15AM

    It's a kumquat...being eaten by a small ornamental bunny.

  • CaptHenwayCaptHenway Posts: 31,429 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Zoins said:
    What is on top of the ribbon on Paquet's double eagle reverse? It looks like an apple or cherry to me.

    Now if it was a cherry, it would be in the Cherry Picker's Guide!

    o:)

    Numismatist. 50 year member ANA. Winner of four ANA Heath Literary Awards; three Wayte and Olga Raymond Literary Awards; Numismatist of the Year Award 2009, and Lifetime Achievement Award 2020. Winner numerous NLG Literary Awards.
  • specialistspecialist Posts: 956 ✭✭✭✭✭

    There are some changes in the pedigrees of the PP coins. Simpson actually let me sell his first set to a commem collecting customer I have. Simpson and I then assembled a second set for hi. So in copper he now has the PR66RB NGC. NONE of his coins have yet to go to CAC. He has owned BOTH gold PP 's. One is now in that commem. Pretty cool stuff!

  • ZoinsZoins Posts: 33,811 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited December 4, 2018 7:36PM

    @specialist said:
    There are some changes in the pedigrees of the PP coins. Simpson actually let me sell his first set to a commem collecting customer I have. Simpson and I then assembled a second set for hi. So in copper he now has the PR66RB NGC. NONE of his coins have yet to go to CAC. He has owned BOTH gold PP 's. One is now in that commem. Pretty cool stuff!

    Thanks for the update. Great to know that Simpson is a seller too. Gives hope to other collectors! ;)

  • ZoinsZoins Posts: 33,811 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The Paquet 1857 Double Eagle reverse splasher sold for $20,400.00. Wonder who's collection it's in now.

    https://coins.ha.com/itm/patterns/-1857-double-eagle-reverse-die-trial-j-a1857-9-unique-ms64-red-and-brown-pcgs-ex-garrett-this-uniface-die-tria/a/1291-4819.s?ic16=ViewItem-BrowseTabs-Inventory-BuyNowFromOwner-MyBids-101116

    There's an interesting image taken by PCGS when it was in another holder. Anyone know what holder this was?

  • RogerBRogerB Posts: 8,852 ✭✭✭✭✭

    A quick terminology consistency check.
    The Paquet design piece is a "die trial" in copper; these were also made in tin, lead, bronze, pewter, zinc, solder and other cheap, soft metals. Usually, a die is surface hardened prior to making a die trial to prevent damage.

    A "splasher" is made to quickly examine a master hub or master die design during engraving work to make sure changes are as expected; this is done by pressing the cold, soft steel die into a puddle of tin, lead or solder that has been poured on a flat surface. The col die instantly solidifies liquid metal without possible deformation of the steel die.

    (For examples of use of soft steel dies to strike patterns see the 1916 dime and quarter, first pieces of May, 1916.)

  • ZoinsZoins Posts: 33,811 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @RogerB said:
    A quick terminology consistency check.
    The Paquet design piece is a "die trial" in copper; these were also made in tin, lead, bronze, pewter, zinc, solder and other cheap, soft metals. Usually, a die is surface hardened prior to making a die trial to prevent damage.

    A "splasher" is made to quickly examine a master hub or master die design during engraving work to make sure changes are as expected; this is done by pressing the cold, soft steel die into a puddle of tin, lead or solder that has been poured on a flat surface. The col die instantly solidifies liquid metal without possible deformation of the steel die.

    (For examples of use of soft steel dies to strike patterns see the 1916 dime and quarter, first pieces of May, 1916.)

    Thanks for the info Roger. I'll read up on splashers more now!

  • ZoinsZoins Posts: 33,811 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The Paquet die trial sold for $20,400.00 at FUN. It was fun to have the high bid early on and then see where this ended up. It's still pedigreed only to Garrett.

  • ZoinsZoins Posts: 33,811 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited March 10, 2019 7:54AM

    Flowing Hair Stella in Aluminum

    I ran across these today and think they are amazing.

    Heritage lists the following known specimens from a 2016 auction. Of note, the second specimen, PCGS PR65 NGC is a gilt aluminum specimen.

    https://coins.ha.com/itm/patterns/1880-4-flowing-hair-four-dollar-stella-judd-1659-pollock-1859-high-r7-pr64-cameo-pcgs-cac/a/1238-4437.s?ic4=GalleryView-ShortDescription-071515

    Roster of 1880 Flowing Hair Aluminum Stellas, Judd-1659
    1. PR67 PCGS. Paramount (Rare Coin List #10, 6/1975); Jeff Browning; Dallas Bank Collection (Sotheby's and Stack's, 10/2001), lot 370; Simpson Collection.
    2. PR65 NGC. Auction '89 (Superior, 7/1989), lot 874; September Sale (Stack's, 9/2003), lot 704; David Queller; Lemus Collection (Heritage, 1/2009), lot 1938. Gilt aluminum.
    3. PR64 Cameo PCGS. FUN Signature Auction (Heritage, 1/2007), lot 1600. The present piece.
    4. Gem Proof. Dr. Edward Maris; Maris Collection (H.P. Smith, 6/1886), lot 227; T. Harrison Garrett; Garrett Collection (Stack's, 3/1976), part of a complete set of aluminum stellas in lot 668; Harry W. Bass, Jr.; Harry W. Bass Foundation.
    5. Brilliant Uncirculated. Rio Rancho Estate (Superior, 10/1974), lot 138. Gilt aluminum (plate matching confirms this is not the Lemus Collection example in number 2 above).

    Additional Appearances It is quite likely that some, and perhaps most, of these other appearances cited in the literature actually represent duplications of the coins above. They include:
    A. Two pieces owned by Virgil Brand.
    B. King Farouk; Palace Collections of Egypt (Sotheby's, 2/1954), lot 1995.
    C. King Farouk; Palace Collections of Egypt (Sotheby's, 2/1954), lot 2025.
    D. The William H. Woodin-1914 ANS Exhibition-Waldo Newcomer coin.
    E. Lee G. Lahrman Collection (Abe Kosoff, 2/1963), lot 915.
    F. August F. Hausske, Central States Auction (RARCOA,5/1969), lot 273.
    G. 50th Anniversary Sale (Kagin's, 5/1975), lot 1061.

    These are the two listed by CoinFacts:

    1880 $4 Flowing Hair $4 Stella in Aluminum (Judd-1659, Pollock-1859) PCGS PR68 Cameo, Simpson

    This is pedigreed to Simpson.

    This may be the PCGS PR67 specimen mentioned by Heritage in their 2016 ANA description. The PCGS pops list only 2, one in 64 and one in 68. I need to track down a PCGS PR67 photo to compare.

    1880 $4 Flowing Hair $4 Stella in Aluminum (Judd-1659, Pollock-1859) PCGS PR64 Cameo CAC

    This coin doesn't have a pedigree but was sold by Heritage twice, at 2016 ANA for $76,375.00 and at 2007 FUN for $63,250.00. It had a different cert number in 2007 (10007615) which no longer verifies. Comparison of the 11224592 TrueView and 10007615 Heritage photos show numerous diagnostics indicating they are the same coin.

  • ZoinsZoins Posts: 33,811 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited March 10, 2019 8:54AM

    Here's a related J-1659 gilt aluminum 1880 Stella.

    1880 $4 Flowing Hair $4 Stella in Aluminum (Judd-1659 Gilt) PCGS PR64+, Pop 0/1/0, Simpson, Lemus

    It looks like the Lemus / Queller Family specimen by comparing photos with the Heritage 2009 FUN auction, and thus not the Rio Rancho Estate specimen. Here's information on the Lemus specimen which was in a NGC slab. It seems like the coin is still certified by NGC as a pop 0/1/0 there.

  • specialistspecialist Posts: 956 ✭✭✭✭✭

    on the pan pacs-Simspon has a set and so does another customer of mine (copper, silver, and gold). The second collector we built a mega commem set for and includes patetrns and proofs!

    pick a pattern, we probably have it in SImspon-so long as it was nice. he "fired" ones he did not like.

  • ZoinsZoins Posts: 33,811 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited March 10, 2019 5:36PM

    @specialist said:
    on the pan pacs-Simspon has a set and so does another customer of mine (copper, silver, and gold). The second collector we built a mega commem set for and includes patetrns and proofs!

    pick a pattern, we probably have it in SImspon-so long as it was nice. he "fired" ones he did not like.

    It's great that Bob has so many awesome patterns. It's great to run across these and see they have his pedigree. It would be nice if other pedigrees were kept with his. For example, it would be great if the gilt aluminum 1880 Stella said "Lemus, Simpson" instead of just Simpson.

    Did any of your clients pick up the Paquet double eagle die trial above? Also, do you know who owns the Pan Pac hub trial in the first post?

  • koynekwestkoynekwest Posts: 10,048 ✭✭✭✭✭

  • specialistspecialist Posts: 956 ✭✭✭✭✭

    a dealer owns the die trial. I can't get to his value for it. he brings it to shows

  • ZoinsZoins Posts: 33,811 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited April 22, 2019 7:10AM

    1907 St Gaudens Indian Head Double Eagle J-1776 PR67

    I got interested in reading a bit more about this as it was recently noted that a $15M private treaty offer for this pattern was declined.

    The following is from Bowers and Ruddy Galleries who handled the 1981 ANA sale:

    "The most valuable United States coin" is a title which can justifiably have several claimants, at least so far as theoretical values are concerned. But, it is certain that a leading contender is a piece which is included in the present catalogue: the beautiful and unique 1907 Indian Head $20, MCMVII (1907), in high relief.

    An interesting part of this history of this coin is that it was owned by Paramount who seems to have traded it for a hoard of Redfield silver dollars which it then sold in the special holders.

    Paramount International purchased the entire collection from Brownlee and Leidman later in 1973. Several of the gold patterns were traded to A-Mark for Redfield silver dollars, which were sold for several years by Paramount in specially designed Redfield holders.

    The white background photo below is courtesy of David Akers/Bob Harwell on PCGS CoinFacts. I placed it on a black background below.

    Pedigree History paraphrased from Jack Hancock and Bob Harwell: (http://www.raregold.com/pages/page/Judd1776) and PCGS (https://www.pcgs.com/setregistry/u-s-patterns/complete-sets/complete-gold-patterns/alltimeset/22286) along with some full names I found online.

    • major North Eastern collector of Saint Gaudens coinage
    • 1981: Jack Hancock and Bob Harwell (Hancock & Harwell Rare Coins) purchased the coin in the ANA Auction in 1981 for $475,000, setting a record auction price at the time.
    • 1979: Julian Leidman (Maryland dealer) purchased for $500,000 in private treaty from A-Mark Financial
    • A-Mark Financial acquired the coin from Paramount International in a trade for Redfield silver dollars, which Paramount sold in specially designed Redfield holders.
    • 1973: Paramount International Coin Corporation (David Akers) purchased it along with many other gold patterns from Brownlee and Leidman in 1973.
    • 1973: Mike Brownlee and Julian Leidman purchased the Wilkison's collection in a transaction brokered by Tennessee Coin Exchange. John Wilkison's company, Wilkison International, was founded in 1972.
    • 1956: Dr. John Edwin Wilkison Sr. of Tennessee purchased from Kosoff in 1956 for $10,000.
    • Abe Kosoff went to Cairo and bought the coin for the second time for 1,200 Egyptian Pounds or approximately $3,400.
    • King Farouk purchased the coin for slightly less than $10,000 from Kosoff and Kreisberg.
    • Abe Kosoff and Abner Kreisberg (Numismatic Gallery) purchased for $1,500 from wife of Fred C.C. Boyd shortly after Kosoff and Kreisberg sold the rest of Boyd's collection in 1944 and 1945.
    • Fred Charles Cogswell Boyd (owner of Union News Company) purchased the coin from Edgar Adams who was offering the coin on behalf of Waldo C. Newcomer.
    • Waldo Charles Newcomer, well-known Baltimore collector, obtained the piece directly from the estate of Charles Barber, the Chief Engraver of the U.S. Mint when the piece was struck.
    • Charles Edward Barber obtained this pattern for his private collection from the Mint.

    Here's some info on John E Wilkison's company:

    Wilkison International is a coin dealer specializing in certified, investment-quality rare gold coins from around the world. Wilkison is an NGC and PCGS authorized dealer founded in 1972 by renowned numismatist Dr. John E. Wilkison, known for assembling one of the world’s finest collections of U.S. gold coins. Their selection includes ancient and modern, high-grade gold coins. Some of the rarest gold coins in the world can be found here. Their entire inventory can be viewed and purchased online.

  • CaptHenwayCaptHenway Posts: 31,429 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Amazing indeed!

    Numismatist. 50 year member ANA. Winner of four ANA Heath Literary Awards; three Wayte and Olga Raymond Literary Awards; Numismatist of the Year Award 2009, and Lifetime Achievement Award 2020. Winner numerous NLG Literary Awards.
  • HemisphericalHemispherical Posts: 9,370 ✭✭✭✭✭

    That is amazing!

  • kbbpllkbbpll Posts: 542 ✭✭✭✭

    I got interested in this one, apparently the only Barber dime pattern and in the Smithsonian. Barber must have really liked the extra fold under the right ribbon, because he added it back to the design in 1901.

  • ms70ms70 Posts: 13,945 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited April 22, 2019 7:18AM

    If only we had these today!

    Great transactions with oih82w8, JasonGaming, Moose1913.

  • ZoinsZoins Posts: 33,811 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @ms70 said:
    If only we had these today!

    It was nice when Mint employees could take patterns for their personal collections like Charles Barber did for the St. Gaudens Indian Head Double Eagle. More recently, the US Mint reclaimed the 1974-D Aluminum Cent which was in the collection of Harry Edmond Lawrence, a former deputy superintendent of the Denver Mint.

  • RogerBRogerB Posts: 8,852 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited April 22, 2019 9:04AM

    RE: "It was nice when Mint employees could take patterns for their personal collections like Charles Barber did for the St. Gaudens [sic] Indian Head Double Eagle."

    Barber did not make pattern and experimental pieces for his personal collection. The pieces were ordered by the mint director - some at instruction from President Roosevelt. Barber, along with several other officers, was permitted to buy pieces that were not otherwise allocated to the President. This avoided having to melt the pieces to balance the gold bullion account.

    In 1908 members of the Assay Commission were each offered one 1907 $10 Saint-Gaudens coin with periods on the reverse and knife rims. Only member William Ashbrook was interested and he bought all coins the others refused.

    [See Renaissance of American Coinage 1905-1908 for details.]

  • CoinosaurusCoinosaurus Posts: 9,612 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Saul Teichman's spreadsheet of significant patterns in the Brand collection is at:

    https://nnp.wustl.edu/library/archivedetail/513927?Year=2017&take=50

  • RogerBRogerB Posts: 8,852 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Thanks! Who wouldn't love to have that bunch of patterns - even if they were disorganized!

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