Some dipping advice

PTVETTERPTVETTER Posts: 4,795 ✭✭✭✭

Don’t dip clan coins
The copper ions will transfer to the surfaces

Pat Vetter,Mercury Dime registry set,1938 Proof set registry,Pat & BJ Coins:724-325-7211


Comments

  • PTVETTERPTVETTER Posts: 4,795 ✭✭✭✭

    Clad coins auto spell check does not always work

    Pat Vetter,Mercury Dime registry set,1938 Proof set registry,Pat & BJ Coins:724-325-7211


  • blitzdudeblitzdude Posts: 1,015 ✭✭✭✭

    Dip em all I say. Nice shiny coins just like they were meant to be.

  • Insider2Insider2 Posts: 8,372 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Hint, If you wish to brighten a clad coin, KEEP THE CHEMICAL AWAY FROM ITS EDGE. Now, go figure out how to do that - it's easy. B)

  • HemisphericalHemispherical Posts: 184 ✭✭✭

    @Insider2 said:
    Hint, If you wish to brighten a clad coin, KEEP THE CHEMICAL AWAY FROM ITS EDGE. Now, go figure out how to do that - it's easy. B)

    Coat the edge with some type of oil (or substance) that does will not combine with the chemical.

  • Timbuk3Timbuk3 Posts: 8,325 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Why would you want to dip clad coins ? Just asking !!! :)

    Timbuk3
  • MizzouMizzou Posts: 74 ✭✭✭

    I thought this thread was about a different kind of dipping -

  • TwoSides2aCoinTwoSides2aCoin Posts: 39,726 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Dip cookies in milk, for the best results.

  • Insider2Insider2 Posts: 8,372 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Timbuk3 said:
    Why would you want to dip clad coins ? Just asking !!! :)

    Simple, because it can improve their eye appeal or remove contamination.

  • @Hemispherical said:

    @Insider2 said:
    Hint, If you wish to brighten a clad coin, KEEP THE CHEMICAL AWAY FROM ITS EDGE. Now, go figure out how to do that - it's easy. B)

    Coat the edge with some type of oil (or substance) that does will not combine with the chemical.

    Been thinking about this... Use wax on the edge.

  • Namvet69Namvet69 Posts: 1,292 ✭✭✭✭

    I don't think acetone reacts with metal. What chemical are you talking about? Peace Roy

  • Insider2Insider2 Posts: 8,372 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Namvet69 said:
    I don't think acetone reacts with metal. What chemical are you talking about? Peace Roy

    Why do you think that?

  • KccoinKccoin Posts: 602 ✭✭✭

    @TwoSides2aCoin said:
    Dip cookies in milk, for the best results.

    now thats a dip i can admit to :o

  • PTVETTERPTVETTER Posts: 4,795 ✭✭✭✭

    I am referring to that blue silver dip

    Pat Vetter,Mercury Dime registry set,1938 Proof set registry,Pat & BJ Coins:724-325-7211


  • DMWJRDMWJR Posts: 5,784 ✭✭✭✭

    Dipping clan coins white? LOL. You hate copper you copper racist !! LOL.

    (I hate spellcheck).

    Yes, save the dip ... don't do clad. Dip doesn't work on nickel the same way as silver.

    Doug
    The Ultimate Flying Eagles
    https://www.pcgs.com/setregistry/showcase/3203
  • Insider2Insider2 Posts: 8,372 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 9, 2018 10:07AM

    A lot of opinions flying around this thread..."don't use acetone on metal, don't dip clad coins..." Yikes! I'm glad I don't listen to opinions or XXX may have never been started.

  • Insider2Insider2 Posts: 8,372 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Thanks Ricko,

    I added punctuation to my post as those opinions were not mine. I've been cleaning coins and jewelry (father was a watchmaker before starting an anodizing business) since I was 8 or 9 years old. :) I can't help myself when I see something needing cleaning. In the 1970's, we would call customers for permission to clean their coins when necessary for authentication. That option was eventually printed on the submission form to save us the trouble.

    PS Always learning new "tricks" and there is plenty still to learn. The "expert" coin doctors could teach all of us a thing or ten. :)

  • jwittenjwitten Posts: 2,836 ✭✭✭✭✭

    One of my 2017 Palladium coins had a big smudge on it. I dipped it (first time dipping a coin), and it graded 70! I was thrilled.

  • Namvet69Namvet69 Posts: 1,292 ✭✭✭✭

    Thank you Insider2 and ricko. Skip, I like your new user image. Peace Roy

  • RexfordRexford Posts: 406 ✭✭✭✭

    @blitzdude said:
    Dip em all I say. Nice shiny coins just like they were meant to be.

    Dipping is removing a tiny layer of metal from the surface of the coin, exposing the untarnished metal underneath. This is technically damaging the coin, and as a layer of metal is now missing it is NOT how it was meant to be.

  • Insider2Insider2 Posts: 8,372 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 9, 2018 1:22PM

    @Rexford said:

    @blitzdude said:
    Dip em all I say. Nice shiny coins just like they were meant to be.

    Dipping is removing a tiny layer of metal from the surface of the coin, exposing the untarnished metal underneath. This is technically damaging the coin, and as a layer of metal is now missing it is NOT how it was meant to be.

    Fortunately, when a coin is properly dipped multiple times, our human eyes cannot detect the infinitesimal amount of metal removed from its surface. However, I'll concede you this, some time between the first proper dip and the 10,000th proper dip (when the coin and your fingers have dissolved) you will see a difference.

    Let's please get real and stop posting about "removing metal" until we can see it! My chosen nickname at a place I once worked was "Dipper" :p

  • DIMEMANDIMEMAN Posts: 16,936 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Insider2 said:

    @Namvet69 said:
    I don't think acetone reacts with metal. What chemical are you talking about? Peace Roy

    Why do you think that?

    Because it doesn't. ;) :) B)


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  • Insider2Insider2 Posts: 8,372 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @DIMEMAN said:

    @Insider2 said:

    @Namvet69 said:
    I don't think acetone reacts with metal. What chemical are you talking about? Peace Roy

    Why do you think that?

    Because it doesn't. ;) :) B)

    It all depends on what you thought the definition of the word "react" is... :wink: If I let you look it up for yourself, you'll remember it longer and possibly understand my question that you quoted. :) o:)

  • RexfordRexford Posts: 406 ✭✭✭✭

    @Insider2 said:

    @Rexford said:

    @blitzdude said:
    Dip em all I say. Nice shiny coins just like they were meant to be.

    Dipping is removing a tiny layer of metal from the surface of the coin, exposing the untarnished metal underneath. This is technically damaging the coin, and as a layer of metal is now missing it is NOT how it was meant to be.

    Fortunately, when a coin is properly dipped multiple times, our human eyes cannot detect the infinitesimal amount of metal removed from its surface. However, I'll concede you this, some time between the first proper dip and the 10,000th proper dip (when the coin and your fingers have dissolved) you will see a difference.

    Let's please get real and stop posting about "removing metal" until we can see it! My chosen nickname at a place I once worked was "Dipper" :p

    Right, but my point is that dipping is not reverting the coin to it's proper state, but miscroscopically damaging it, even if you can't see it. Also, coins do look very different when dipped than when freshly made. Any coin with natural wear that has been dipped will look completely unnatural, and many uncirculated coins will look strange after being dipped because the rims of the devices will be unnaturally bright.

  • Insider2Insider2 Posts: 8,372 ✭✭✭✭✭

    While I agree that one dip will CHANGE a coin - I don't knowingly live at atomic particle level (my body does), let's agree that you are 100% correct and I may be correct as we'll never get to try the test below.

    I guarantee if I gave you or anyone a test using 5 new silver eagles, only dipping the same one, then placing them on a pad in a grading room (in different or the same position in the row each time) for you to examine; I think you would modify your opinion after ten tries (10 dips of same coin) to pick the newly dipped coin for each test. if you were very lucky, you might get one right - the blind rat theory. I'd also make you wear a mask and gloves in case I got lazy and did not dry and neutralize the coin properly. That way you could not smell it or feel any change in its temperature or moisture. :)

  • RexfordRexford Posts: 406 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November 9, 2018 3:58PM

    @Insider2 said:
    While I agree that one dip will CHANGE a coin - I don't knowingly live at atomic particle level (my body does), let's agree that you are 100% correct and I may be correct as we'll never get to try the test below.

    I guarantee if I gave you or anyone a test using 5 new silver eagles, only dipping the same one, then placing them on a pad in a grading room (in different or the same position in the row each time) for you to examine; I think you would modify your opinion after ten tries (10 dips of same coin) to pick the newly dipped coin for each test. if you were very lucky, you might get one right - the blind rat theory. I'd also make you wear a mask and gloves in case I got lazy and did not dry and neutralize the coin properly. That way you could not smell it or feel any change in its temperature or moisture. :)

    I agree, but I'm thinking more about older coins that actually look significantly different now than they did when made due to toning or wear.

  • Insider2Insider2 Posts: 8,372 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I agree, Dipping circulated coins is a very "tricky" business. IMO, it has not been mastered by most individuals.

  • RogerBRogerB Posts: 5,972 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I recommend that for dipping you do not buy apples that are very large. People can't get their teeth into them. Also, select a sweeter apple -- Fuji, Gala, etc., not Granny Smith which is a good baking apple.

  • batumibatumi Posts: 230 ✭✭✭

    @Insider2 said:
    Thanks Ricko,

    I added punctuation to my post as those opinions were not mine. I've been cleaning coins and jewelry (father was a watchmaker before starting an anodizing business) since I was 8 or 9 years old. :) I can't help myself when I see something needing cleaning. In the 1970's, we would call customers for permission to clean their coins when necessary for authentication. That option was eventually printed on the submission form to save us the trouble.

    PS Always learning new "tricks" and there is plenty still to learn. The "expert" coin doctors could teach all of us a thing or ten. :)

    Insider2: Even though I am curious as to certain methods, I am not holding my breath awaiting the 'expert' coin doctors to let their trade secrets out to the public!

  • Had a great-aunt that dipped. Found her snuff jars when clearing house.

  • Insider2Insider2 Posts: 8,372 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @batumi said: "Even though I am curious as to certain methods, I am not holding my breath awaiting the 'expert' coin doctors to let their trade secrets out to the public!"

    "Doctoring" is not good for the business. In addition to altering coins most probably know how to clean them.
    Cleaning coins properly is a good thing. Furthermore, information that we find on these chat boards might save one more coin from being ruined. The "doctors" are not going to let go of their secrets easily. I had to part with a rainbow CC dollar (before the prices skyrocketed) from my teaching set to get one of them to tell me how he puts color on a Morgan dollar. In the end, it was really of no use to detect alterations as the coins in his coins looked NT.

    Cleaning coins conserves them. I regularly remove stuff from coins (that many would not even see) before they are graded. Eventually, if left on the coin, they would become more detracting and etch the surface. Anyone can do it with magnification and some instructions.

    At the January 2020 FUN Show, I'll be giving a presentation "So You Want To Clean Your Coins."

  • DMWJRDMWJR Posts: 5,784 ✭✭✭✭

    I thought we were talking about clad coins here?

    Doug
    The Ultimate Flying Eagles
    https://www.pcgs.com/setregistry/showcase/3203
  • PTVETTERPTVETTER Posts: 4,795 ✭✭✭✭

    Funny how some subjects just take a life of their own
    Started out about clad coins
    However ANY information that help the hobby is welcome on my thread!

    Pat Vetter,Mercury Dime registry set,1938 Proof set registry,Pat & BJ Coins:724-325-7211


  • bidaskbidask Posts: 10,109 ✭✭✭✭

    @ricko said:
    @Insider2 .... Acetone is an organic solvent, it will NOT react with metal... it will not remove tarnish... it only removes organic residues. Cheers, RickO

    What solution is good for dipping modern silver coins?

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  • @Insider2 said:
    Hint, If you wish to brighten a clad coin, KEEP THE CHEMICAL AWAY FROM ITS EDGE. Now, go figure out how to do that - it's easy. B)

    Apply with a Q-Tip?

  • AkbeezAkbeez Posts: 1,649 ✭✭✭

    I know there have been numerous posts on clearing (not cleaning) copper cents of corrosion, but what is the current consensus on this? Got a stash of Indians and Lincolns that have CuSO4 growing on them. Gotta stop that!

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  • BlindedByEgoBlindedByEgo Posts: 10,416 ✭✭✭✭

    Everyone knows you can't skinny dip when you're clad.

  • Insider2Insider2 Posts: 8,372 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @DMWJR said:
    I thought we were talking about clad coins here?

    Round pieces of metal of different compositions are all basically the same. Only the chemicals and method to achieve the desired result is different.

  • Insider2Insider2 Posts: 8,372 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @CoinscratchFever said:

    @Insider2 said:
    Hint, If you wish to brighten a clad coin, KEEP THE CHEMICAL AWAY FROM ITS EDGE. Now, go figure out how to do that - it's easy. B)

    Apply with a Q-Tip?

    Told you it was easy!! :wink:

  • @Insider2 said:

    @CoinscratchFever said:

    @Insider2 said:
    Hint, If you wish to brighten a clad coin, KEEP THE CHEMICAL AWAY FROM ITS EDGE. Now, go figure out how to do that - it's easy. B)

    Apply with a Q-Tip?

    Told you it was easy!! :wink:

    Seriously? I didn't even know that the edge was affected differently, something happens during the strike?

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