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Lost package by USPS to PSA

FrankC79FrankC79 Posts: 9

Hi All,
Looking for any knowledge and experience in this area. Really crushed by this one. Just got back into the sports cards world with my son. We took hours look through my old cards for the best ones. Got them all together and sent them to PSA to be graded on 11/19. USPS Tracking on 11/24 says delayed in transit from Philadelphia to next hub. And that is it! I get nothing from USPS they can’t find it. PSA does nothing but look at USPS tracking. Am I just out of luck? Kiss them cards good bye! Please let me know if anyone can help.

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Comments

  • ndleondleo Posts: 3,519 ✭✭✭✭

    Do you mean 10/19 and 10/24? What service did you use to send it? Express? Priority?

    Mike
  • I’ve had a handful say delayed in transit over past few months .. some took up to 2 weeks to update , but they all eventually arrived

  • AhmanfanAhmanfan Posts: 3,872 ✭✭✭

    Have you called the local postmaster to start an investigation?

    Collecting
    HOF SIGNED FOOTBALL RCS
  • 1951WheatiesPremium1951WheatiesPremium Posts: 3,288 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @FrankC79 said:

    Hi All,
    Looking for any knowledge and experience in this area. Really crushed by this one. Just got back into the sports cards world with my son. We took hours look through my old cards for the best ones. Got them all together and sent them to PSA to be graded on 11/19. USPS Tracking on 11/24 says delayed in transit from Philadelphia to next hub. And that is it! I get nothing from USPS they can’t find it. PSA does nothing but look at USPS tracking. Am I just out of luck? Kiss them cards good bye! Please let me know if anyone can help.

    Frank,

    I assume those are October dates and not November dates? Time travel is not possible yet.

    Use the tracking number and contact USPS. I am guessing much of the US postal resources in Pennsylvania have been allocated toward ballot collection and sweeps for the last 2-3 weeks and impacting normal service.

    I would say if you have patience and persistence you’ll be fine.

    Curious about the rare, mysterious and beautiful 1951 Wheaties Premium Photos?

    https://forums.collectors.com/discussion/987963/1951-wheaties-premium-photos-set-registry#latest

  • ndleondleo Posts: 3,519 ✭✭✭✭

    @1951WheatiesPremium said:

    @FrankC79 said:

    Hi All,
    Looking for any knowledge and experience in this area. Really crushed by this one. Just got back into the sports cards world with my son. We took hours look through my old cards for the best ones. Got them all together and sent them to PSA to be graded on 11/19. USPS Tracking on 11/24 says delayed in transit from Philadelphia to next hub. And that is it! I get nothing from USPS they can’t find it. PSA does nothing but look at USPS tracking. Am I just out of luck? Kiss them cards good bye! Please let me know if anyone can help.

    Frank,

    I assume those are October dates and not November dates? Time travel is not possible yet.

    Use the tracking number and contact USPS. I am guessing much of the US postal resources in Pennsylvania have been allocated toward ballot collection and sweeps for the last 2-3 weeks and impacting normal service.

    I would say if you have patience and persistence you’ll be fine.

    This true. It seems that the ballot mail made the USPS say "F" it to everything else. My packages got scanned 1-2 days late, which really did a Ned Beatty Deliverance to my TR rating.

    Mike
  • FrankC79FrankC79 Posts: 9
    edited November 10, 2020 2:22PM

    Hi - Sorry I meant 10/19. Last note from USPS tracking was 10/24. All my tracking request got answers from CA post office. They didn’t have it. They checked with philly PO they said package got on plane. PSA just looks up tracking. I know the mail have been crazy in US with election. But coming up on a month. Losing hope. I used USPS Priority Mail Flat Rate Box.

  • 1951WheatiesPremium1951WheatiesPremium Posts: 3,288 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @FrankC79 said:
    Hi - Sorry I meant 10/19. Last note from USPS tracking was 10/24. All my tracking request got answers from CA post office. They didn’t have it. They checked with philly PO they said package got on plane. PSA just looks up tracking. I know the mail have been crazy in US with election. But coming up on a month. Losing hope. I used USPS Priority Mail Flat Rate Box.

    Did you ship with a tracking number?

    Curious about the rare, mysterious and beautiful 1951 Wheaties Premium Photos?

    https://forums.collectors.com/discussion/987963/1951-wheaties-premium-photos-set-registry#latest

  • Yes. Last update from 10/24. In-Transit

    October 24, 2020
    In Transit, Arriving Late

    Both CA and Philly Post Office can not find it to make update.

  • 1951WheatiesPremium1951WheatiesPremium Posts: 3,288 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @FrankC79 said:
    Yes. Last update from 10/24. In-Transit

    October 24, 2020
    In Transit, Arriving Late

    Both CA and Philly Post Office can not find it to make update.

    These things have a way of turning up over time.

    It’s in Philly or LA facility somewhere is my guess. Again, I think things should start flowing through post offices again soon.

    Stay on top of them

    Curious about the rare, mysterious and beautiful 1951 Wheaties Premium Photos?

    https://forums.collectors.com/discussion/987963/1951-wheaties-premium-photos-set-registry#latest

  • flcardtraderflcardtrader Posts: 676 ✭✭✭

    Has a lost mail claim been formally submitted or are you calling each of the PO's?

    Lost mail claim can be submitted here in step 3 -> https://www.usps.com/help/claims.htm

    For me, formal claims have (in most cases) gotten the item delivered, albeit days/week(s) after the expected delivery date.

    [email protected]

    Longtime Set Builder

    Wantlists and Tradelists on my Site:

    http://flcardtrader.16mb.com

    Let's Trade!
  • PROMETHIUS88PROMETHIUS88 Posts: 2,675 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Sent a sub a couple years ago that got lost in the mail. USPS of course denied the claim as I had no receipts for what I actually paid for each individual card. And though they knew it didn't get to the destination, they refused to even refund my shipping cost.
    A month or so later, it shows up at PSA as logged. From what I gather, the shipping label must have gotten ripped off somehow but they got the contents there by the PSA packing slip inside the box. To this day the tracking number still shows in transit.
    With all that is going on, I would follow the steps advised above but give it more time. It's 2020 after all!!

  • wrestlingcardkingwrestlingcardking Posts: 4,538 ✭✭✭✭

    For some items that have significant value I make a package within a package in case there is damage to the outside envelope or box and have it addressed once again to the destination internally. I do not do this each and every time but it calms my nerves a bit to make the additional step.

    BUYING Frank Gotch T229 Kopec
    Looking to BUY n332 1889 SF Hess cards and high grade cards from 19th century especially. "Once you have wrestled everything else in life is easy" Dan Gable
  • Update : Thank You all for the details. Looks like my claim was approved for $58.30. The insurance and price I paid for shipping. Could not provide receipts. Hope it still shows up. Hard one to swallow. $58 dollars for 2 Montana, Taylor, White, Young, and Rice rookie cards. Nothing more I can do. Calls going no where. Take it on the chin.

  • blurryfaceblurryface Posts: 2,222 ✭✭✭✭✭

    thinking it will still show up in a month or two. have faith!

    the best ability is availability.

  • bobbyw8469bobbyw8469 Posts: 6,992 ✭✭✭

    @FrankC79 said:
    Update : Thank You all for the details. Looks like my claim was approved for $58.30. The insurance and price I paid for shipping. Could not provide receipts. Hope it still shows up. Hard one to swallow. $58 dollars for 2 Montana, Taylor, White, Young, and Rice rookie cards. Nothing more I can do. Calls going no where. Take it on the chin.

    Seems cheap for all those cards.....maybe you should have insured for more?

  • Copyboy1Copyboy1 Posts: 146 ✭✭✭
    edited November 11, 2020 12:46PM

    Sometimes they turn up a month later. But I got a screaming deal on 3 cards several months back. Package was lost. I waited hoping they'd turn up. Nope.

    Now those 3 cards I paid $400 for? They'd cost me close to $1000 to re-buy. :|

  • blurryfaceblurryface Posts: 2,222 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 11, 2020 1:29PM

    @bobbyw8469 said:

    @FrankC79 said:
    Update : Thank You all for the details. Looks like my claim was approved for $58.30. The insurance and price I paid for shipping. Could not provide receipts. Hope it still shows up. Hard one to swallow. $58 dollars for 2 Montana, Taylor, White, Young, and Rice rookie cards. Nothing more I can do. Calls going no where. Take it on the chin.

    Seems cheap for all those cards.....maybe you should have insured for more?

    they require recent receipts proving what you paid. since they were part of his sons and his collections, i doubt he wanted to falsely create any and commit insurance fraud against the us govt.

    they will show up.

    the best ability is availability.

  • daltexdaltex Posts: 1,077 ✭✭✭✭

    My first sub ha a similar problem. Eventually I got a letter from the Los Angeles post office with my shipping label apparently cut from the box. I assume my package had been stolen by a postal employee. Ever since I've sent registered.

  • sjjs28sjjs28 Posts: 290 ✭✭✭

    Wishing you nothing but the best - but just wanted to recant an experience I had many years ago ...
    A group of my buddies and I were submitting cherry picked cards from the Bonds Rookies' era.
    150 of the best of the best - boxed up and sent to PSA (and insured!!) -
    Never made it. Never heard from it again - all these many years.

    Search and investigated and no one could locate it (stolen??)

    Here's the fun part - we insured if for $1000 - $1500, don't really remember anymore.
    Guess what happened when we tried to collect on the insurance??
    USPS wanted an accounting what was inside - no problem: we had a line by line inventory
    Next they wanted to know the value of what was lost - we estimated the value at $25 - $50 each. Should be pretty close if they 9 or 10's as we expected.
    Well the post office didn't want to hear any of that .... they told us the cards were worth $0.01 or a $0.10 based on their information - they were ready to cut a check for $15 to settle the claim. Bogus
    We tried to explain how the intricacies of the PSA grading system worked and how the cards were much more valuable and just any example of that (those) cards once they were graded. Not flying.
    We told them to choke on their $15.00

    Here's the point of the story -
    I hope you insured them and maybe went as far as taking pictures -
    But unfortunately they were heading to California, not returning from California.
    If it was the other way around - the replacement value would be easier to ascertain.
    If they are not found and If a claim is made, you can throw out all of the care you took to hi-grade for the "best" and assume
    "pennies on the card" vs. what you valued them for...

    Good Luck

    Steve Saldutti
    [email protected]
    Collector of 1964 Topps Stand Ups, 1965 Embossed and 1971 Topps Baseball.
    Registered Sets: 1964 Stand Ups, 1965 Embossed and 1971 (Baseball)
  • TabeTabe Posts: 4,081 ✭✭✭✭

    @1951WheatiesPremium said:

    Did you ship with a tracking number?

    All domestic packages, regardless of rate, come with a tracking number now.

  • So Agree! That is how I thought it worked. Who has a receipt for everything.

  • 1951WheatiesPremium1951WheatiesPremium Posts: 3,288 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @JoeBanzai said:

    @sjjs28 said:
    Wishing you nothing but the best - but just wanted to recant an experience I had many years ago ...
    A group of my buddies and I were submitting cherry picked cards from the Bonds Rookies' era.
    150 of the best of the best - boxed up and sent to PSA (and insured!!) -
    Never made it. Never heard from it again - all these many years.

    Search and investigated and no one could locate it (stolen??)

    Here's the fun part - we insured if for $1000 - $1500, don't really remember anymore.
    Guess what happened when we tried to collect on the insurance??
    USPS wanted an accounting what was inside - no problem: we had a line by line inventory
    Next they wanted to know the value of what was lost - we estimated the value at $25 - $50 each. Should be pretty close if they 9 or 10's as we expected.
    Well the post office didn't want to hear any of that .... they told us the cards were worth $0.01 or a $0.10 based on their information - they were ready to cut a check for $15 to settle the claim. Bogus
    We tried to explain how the intricacies of the PSA grading system worked and how the cards were much more valuable and just any example of that (those) cards once they were graded. Not flying.
    We told them to choke on their $15.00

    Here's the point of the story -
    I hope you insured them and maybe went as far as taking pictures -
    But unfortunately they were heading to California, not returning from California.
    If it was the other way around - the replacement value would be easier to ascertain.
    If they are not found and If a claim is made, you can throw out all of the care you took to hi-grade for the "best" and assume
    "pennies on the card" vs. what you valued them for...

    Good Luck

    I realize i will lose the argument, but why on earth should you have to prove the value of anything you insure after the item is lost by the insurer? The insurance was purchased at the rate determined (in these cases) by the USPS, if they lose the package they should issue the insurance amount purchased. Seems like fraud to me.

    If they enter into an agreement like this and want proof of value, it should be done prior to the purchase.

    Legal experts, what am I missing?

    Insurance is for ‘up to‘ and in this case, they’re going to do their own valuations.

    PS - They’re right; ungraded cards hold very little value when compared with graded, right? It’s why we all send cards there...

    Curious about the rare, mysterious and beautiful 1951 Wheaties Premium Photos?

    https://forums.collectors.com/discussion/987963/1951-wheaties-premium-photos-set-registry#latest

  • bobbybakerivbobbybakeriv Posts: 1,701 ✭✭✭

    PS - They’re right; ungraded cards hold very little value when compared with graded, right? It’s why we all send cards there...

    Interesting. Why bother to insure raw cards at all (unless you have a high-dollar card with proof of purchase price)? For example, I may buy a raw '75 Topps card for $50 in hopes that it grades out well (thus increasing it's value substantially). I am honestly just asking not debating your logic. I usually insure my cards for what I feel is the raw market value ($50 in this case) but didn't realize the USPS is going to pay pennies on the dollar.

  • Im fairly new here. Ive been back in the hobby for a little over a year. A hobby that consumed my childhood. The cards lost out to girls, then women. Fast forward, I married and they once again have more than their share of my attention... I have a thought since we're all in this together, It can be devastating to loose a package. To those that lost is it morally ok to have victim post a list of what they lost and we can all contribute copies of receipts we may have for identical items? most receipts block out cc info anyways ....

  • usps I can remember ten yrs abo but a half oz gold mexican coin from ebay it was sent with tracking but no signoture confirmation required.. i was on edge waiting for my 900.00 dollar coin .. as soon as it arrived I left work to oick up from home. It was marked delivered I was home with in 15mins no packagwe asked wife no package nothing but, it was marked as delivered. I turned red fuming i tracked dowm mailman two blocks away. ( im 6'1 230llbs and look scrappy, especially ten years ago at 29 or 30) i walked up to mail man stuck out my arm as he started to attemt to ignore and walk away i simply told him you have something thats mine.. he was scared shaking and told me he didnt deliver because he wasnt sure i still lived there( name posted on box to avoid this) At the time i lived in questionable area and mail men were always different . anyways , he handed over poorly packaged coin ( coin was ssimply dropped in regular envelope and set 1/2 oz coin that u could feel i dont know how it made ot that far... keep in mind he gave me coin I scolded him as I walked away I realized I never even told him my address... same for ups where my wiife works constantly new employees , revolving door. guys getting fired for stealing packages everyday.. She says literally everyday. they get searched in and out but guys still manage evryday to steal ... There is no safe method of mail. insurance is a must but like mentioned needs to be researched on how to collect if something bad happens

  • sjjs28sjjs28 Posts: 290 ✭✭✭

    Prior to COVID, based on what happened a long time ago - I still don't mail cards to PSA anymore.
    I only drop them to the PSA folks sitting behind the counter at the Philly show.
    Limits my submissions to 3 times a year, but I feel better about putting the onus on the PSA crew to get them in the proper hands (their own!)

    With the Philly show cancelled and nothing coming until possibly March 2021,
    I'm going to have to mail my next submission ....
    The prospects of waiting until March 2021 and then the PSA turn around time - I may not see the cards i'm sitting on until 2022!!!

    Everything I've read and seen so far puts me soundly in Orioles93 methodology moving forward.

    Steve Saldutti
    [email protected]
    Collector of 1964 Topps Stand Ups, 1965 Embossed and 1971 Topps Baseball.
    Registered Sets: 1964 Stand Ups, 1965 Embossed and 1971 (Baseball)
  • blurryfaceblurryface Posts: 2,222 ✭✭✭✭✭

    collectibles insurance is a much easier route.

    can also cover inbound and outbound packages along with other instances or things that typical homeowners or postal insurance doesn't.

    if you ship a decent amount of packages, the amount of postal insurance purchased (which is a joke, obv) pretty much pays for the annual premium.

    the best ability is availability.

  • grote15grote15 Posts: 28,100 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 11, 2020 7:59PM

    @blurryface said:
    collectibles insurance is a much easier route.

    can also cover inbound and outbound packages along with other instances or things that typical homeowners or postal insurance doesn't.

    if you ship a decent amount of packages, the amount of postal insurance purchased (which is a joke, obv) pretty much pays for the annual premium.

    This. My collectibles policy covers up to $2500 for packages shipped via USPS Priority mail with signature confirmation or up to 60K for packages shipped USPS Registered or Express Mail with signature confirmation. If you ship a lot of packages, the money you save on postal insurance will pay for a nice percentage of your policy each year. And you don't have to worry about fighting the USPS for an insurance claim they are likely to never pay anyway.



    Collecting 1970s Topps baseball wax, rack and cello packs, as well as PCGS graded Half Cents, Large Cents, Two Cent pieces and Three Cent Silver pieces.
  • I sure hope this works out for you. The guys here feel your pain.

  • sayheywyosayheywyo Posts: 220 ✭✭✭

    Feeling your pain!!! Postage would indicate that insurance was $3000. Was it the 6 cards you mentioned or more? A claim for priority mail can be filed after 15 days and up to 60 days after mailing. You may have been able to create/obtain an invoice indicating paid value and also a statement from a hobbyist/dealer for an opinion of potential value to substantiate your reason of insuring as documentation to send to USPS with claim. Is the claim already closed now?

  • Dpeck100Dpeck100 Posts: 10,872 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I quit insuring raw cards I mail to PSA years ago and spend the money on speed and ship them overnight. I was disappointed when I found out I was paying for insurance I really could never collect on and figure my odds of something going array are greatly reduced using their premium service level.

    Good luck on your cards. Hopefully it’s a Covid issue. Earlier in the year packages from Japan were taking over three months and no tracking updates were happening.

  • JoeBanzaiJoeBanzai Posts: 8,279 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @1951WheatiesPremium said:

    @JoeBanzai said:

    @sjjs28 said:
    Wishing you nothing but the best - but just wanted to recant an experience I had many years ago ...
    A group of my buddies and I were submitting cherry picked cards from the Bonds Rookies' era.
    150 of the best of the best - boxed up and sent to PSA (and insured!!) -
    Never made it. Never heard from it again - all these many years.

    Search and investigated and no one could locate it (stolen??)

    Here's the fun part - we insured if for $1000 - $1500, don't really remember anymore.
    Guess what happened when we tried to collect on the insurance??
    USPS wanted an accounting what was inside - no problem: we had a line by line inventory
    Next they wanted to know the value of what was lost - we estimated the value at $25 - $50 each. Should be pretty close if they 9 or 10's as we expected.
    Well the post office didn't want to hear any of that .... they told us the cards were worth $0.01 or a $0.10 based on their information - they were ready to cut a check for $15 to settle the claim. Bogus
    We tried to explain how the intricacies of the PSA grading system worked and how the cards were much more valuable and just any example of that (those) cards once they were graded. Not flying.
    We told them to choke on their $15.00

    Here's the point of the story -
    I hope you insured them and maybe went as far as taking pictures -
    But unfortunately they were heading to California, not returning from California.
    If it was the other way around - the replacement value would be easier to ascertain.
    If they are not found and If a claim is made, you can throw out all of the care you took to hi-grade for the "best" and assume
    "pennies on the card" vs. what you valued them for...

    Good Luck

    I realize i will lose the argument, but why on earth should you have to prove the value of anything you insure after the item is lost by the insurer? The insurance was purchased at the rate determined (in these cases) by the USPS, if they lose the package they should issue the insurance amount purchased. Seems like fraud to me.

    If they enter into an agreement like this and want proof of value, it should be done prior to the purchase.

    Legal experts, what am I missing?

    Insurance is for ‘up to‘ and in this case, they’re going to do their own valuations.

    PS - They’re right; ungraded cards hold very little value when compared with graded, right? It’s why we all send cards there...

    OK, so insuring cards is a waste of time. Since they are basically lying to you about covering your losses, why not keep a receipt for an expensive item and claim it's that?

    To my way of thinking, when you pay for a specific amount of insurance THAT'S what you should get if it's lost. NOT whatever the insurer decides it's worth.................without ever seeing the item.

    WHAT A CROCK OF CHIT!

    2013,14 and 15 Certificate Award Winner Harmon Killebrew Master Set and Master Topps Set
  • 1951WheatiesPremium1951WheatiesPremium Posts: 3,288 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @JoeBanzai said:

    @1951WheatiesPremium said:

    @JoeBanzai said:

    @sjjs28 said:
    Wishing you nothing but the best - but just wanted to recant an experience I had many years ago ...
    A group of my buddies and I were submitting cherry picked cards from the Bonds Rookies' era.
    150 of the best of the best - boxed up and sent to PSA (and insured!!) -
    Never made it. Never heard from it again - all these many years.

    Search and investigated and no one could locate it (stolen??)

    Here's the fun part - we insured if for $1000 - $1500, don't really remember anymore.
    Guess what happened when we tried to collect on the insurance??
    USPS wanted an accounting what was inside - no problem: we had a line by line inventory
    Next they wanted to know the value of what was lost - we estimated the value at $25 - $50 each. Should be pretty close if they 9 or 10's as we expected.
    Well the post office didn't want to hear any of that .... they told us the cards were worth $0.01 or a $0.10 based on their information - they were ready to cut a check for $15 to settle the claim. Bogus
    We tried to explain how the intricacies of the PSA grading system worked and how the cards were much more valuable and just any example of that (those) cards once they were graded. Not flying.
    We told them to choke on their $15.00

    Here's the point of the story -
    I hope you insured them and maybe went as far as taking pictures -
    But unfortunately they were heading to California, not returning from California.
    If it was the other way around - the replacement value would be easier to ascertain.
    If they are not found and If a claim is made, you can throw out all of the care you took to hi-grade for the "best" and assume
    "pennies on the card" vs. what you valued them for...

    Good Luck

    I realize i will lose the argument, but why on earth should you have to prove the value of anything you insure after the item is lost by the insurer? The insurance was purchased at the rate determined (in these cases) by the USPS, if they lose the package they should issue the insurance amount purchased. Seems like fraud to me.

    If they enter into an agreement like this and want proof of value, it should be done prior to the purchase.

    Legal experts, what am I missing?

    Insurance is for ‘up to‘ and in this case, they’re going to do their own valuations.

    PS - They’re right; ungraded cards hold very little value when compared with graded, right? It’s why we all send cards there...

    OK, so insuring cards is a waste of time. Since they are basically lying to you about covering your losses, why not keep a receipt for an expensive item and claim it's that?

    To my way of thinking, when you pay for a specific amount of insurance THAT'S what you should get if it's lost. NOT whatever the insurer decides it's worth.................without ever seeing the item.

    WHAT A CROCK OF CHIT!

    To be clear, I’m not endorsing this just pointing out how insurance works.

    If you don’t have AllState ‘Accident Forgiveness’ or something similar in your policy and you wreck a brand new car?

    Good luck with your insurance company getting back full value. It’s a ‘negotiation’ but the odds are heavily slanted one way in both cases.

    Hypothetically, and let’s be honest, if you send a group of 100 projected post 1980 10s and PSA agrees with none of them, are you still out thousands?

    Curious about the rare, mysterious and beautiful 1951 Wheaties Premium Photos?

    https://forums.collectors.com/discussion/987963/1951-wheaties-premium-photos-set-registry#latest

  • daltexdaltex Posts: 1,077 ✭✭✭✭

    @JoeBanzai said:

    @1951WheatiesPremium said:

    @JoeBanzai said:

    @sjjs28 said:
    Wishing you nothing but the best - but just wanted to recant an experience I had many years ago ...
    A group of my buddies and I were submitting cherry picked cards from the Bonds Rookies' era.
    150 of the best of the best - boxed up and sent to PSA (and insured!!) -
    Never made it. Never heard from it again - all these many years.

    Search and investigated and no one could locate it (stolen??)

    Here's the fun part - we insured if for $1000 - $1500, don't really remember anymore.
    Guess what happened when we tried to collect on the insurance??
    USPS wanted an accounting what was inside - no problem: we had a line by line inventory
    Next they wanted to know the value of what was lost - we estimated the value at $25 - $50 each. Should be pretty close if they 9 or 10's as we expected.
    Well the post office didn't want to hear any of that .... they told us the cards were worth $0.01 or a $0.10 based on their information - they were ready to cut a check for $15 to settle the claim. Bogus
    We tried to explain how the intricacies of the PSA grading system worked and how the cards were much more valuable and just any example of that (those) cards once they were graded. Not flying.
    We told them to choke on their $15.00

    Here's the point of the story -
    I hope you insured them and maybe went as far as taking pictures -
    But unfortunately they were heading to California, not returning from California.
    If it was the other way around - the replacement value would be easier to ascertain.
    If they are not found and If a claim is made, you can throw out all of the care you took to hi-grade for the "best" and assume
    "pennies on the card" vs. what you valued them for...

    Good Luck

    I realize i will lose the argument, but why on earth should you have to prove the value of anything you insure after the item is lost by the insurer? The insurance was purchased at the rate determined (in these cases) by the USPS, if they lose the package they should issue the insurance amount purchased. Seems like fraud to me.

    If they enter into an agreement like this and want proof of value, it should be done prior to the purchase.

    Legal experts, what am I missing?

    Insurance is for ‘up to‘ and in this case, they’re going to do their own valuations.

    PS - They’re right; ungraded cards hold very little value when compared with graded, right? It’s why we all send cards there...

    OK, so insuring cards is a waste of time. Since they are basically lying to you about covering your losses, why not keep a receipt for an expensive item and claim it's that?

    To my way of thinking, when you pay for a specific amount of insurance THAT'S what you should get if it's lost. NOT whatever the insurer decides it's worth.................without ever seeing the item.

    WHAT A CROCK OF CHIT!

    To my way of thinking, insurance should cover exactly what the contract says it will cover. It is not the USPS's fault if you buy their product without reading or understanding the contract. If I recall correctly, you've twice on this thread suggested resorting to insurance fraud to be "made whole". I have little doubt, but no hard evidence, that this is a federal crime. All it takes is for the package to turn up after you've been compensated for the fraudulently claimed contents, and you're in a heap of trouble.

  • bobbybakerivbobbybakeriv Posts: 1,701 ✭✭✭

    @daltex said:

    @JoeBanzai said:

    @1951WheatiesPremium said:

    @JoeBanzai said:

    @sjjs28 said:
    Wishing you nothing but the best - but just wanted to recant an experience I had many years ago ...
    A group of my buddies and I were submitting cherry picked cards from the Bonds Rookies' era.
    150 of the best of the best - boxed up and sent to PSA (and insured!!) -
    Never made it. Never heard from it again - all these many years.

    Search and investigated and no one could locate it (stolen??)

    Here's the fun part - we insured if for $1000 - $1500, don't really remember anymore.
    Guess what happened when we tried to collect on the insurance??
    USPS wanted an accounting what was inside - no problem: we had a line by line inventory
    Next they wanted to know the value of what was lost - we estimated the value at $25 - $50 each. Should be pretty close if they 9 or 10's as we expected.
    Well the post office didn't want to hear any of that .... they told us the cards were worth $0.01 or a $0.10 based on their information - they were ready to cut a check for $15 to settle the claim. Bogus
    We tried to explain how the intricacies of the PSA grading system worked and how the cards were much more valuable and just any example of that (those) cards once they were graded. Not flying.
    We told them to choke on their $15.00

    Here's the point of the story -
    I hope you insured them and maybe went as far as taking pictures -
    But unfortunately they were heading to California, not returning from California.
    If it was the other way around - the replacement value would be easier to ascertain.
    If they are not found and If a claim is made, you can throw out all of the care you took to hi-grade for the "best" and assume
    "pennies on the card" vs. what you valued them for...

    Good Luck

    I realize i will lose the argument, but why on earth should you have to prove the value of anything you insure after the item is lost by the insurer? The insurance was purchased at the rate determined (in these cases) by the USPS, if they lose the package they should issue the insurance amount purchased. Seems like fraud to me.

    If they enter into an agreement like this and want proof of value, it should be done prior to the purchase.

    Legal experts, what am I missing?

    Insurance is for ‘up to‘ and in this case, they’re going to do their own valuations.

    PS - They’re right; ungraded cards hold very little value when compared with graded, right? It’s why we all send cards there...

    OK, so insuring cards is a waste of time. Since they are basically lying to you about covering your losses, why not keep a receipt for an expensive item and claim it's that?

    To my way of thinking, when you pay for a specific amount of insurance THAT'S what you should get if it's lost. NOT whatever the insurer decides it's worth.................without ever seeing the item.

    WHAT A CROCK OF CHIT!

    To my way of thinking, insurance should cover exactly what the contract says it will cover. It is not the USPS's fault if you buy their product without reading or understanding the contract. If I recall correctly, you've twice on this thread suggested resorting to insurance fraud to be "made whole". I have little doubt, but no hard evidence, that this is a federal crime. All it takes is for the package to turn up after you've been compensated for the fraudulently claimed contents, and you're in a heap of trouble.

    I get what you are saying and I certainly don't condone any type of fraud. However, every time I have purchased insurance via the USPS, it has been at the counter and I was not once explicitly asked to sign a "contract." The employee simply asks 'would you like additional insurance?' to which I respond 'yes' and the amount. I am sure it is in the fine print somewhere but I have never been pointed to a contract nor explanation of the process. I did not know that in the case of loss, the USPS then determines the value irrespective of how much insurance you purchased. This seems to be poor customer service at the least to me. After all, they do charge you for the value you estimate the items to be worth and price their coverage accordingly. It seems shady to then decide the value estimation was not accurate after you've paid for the coverage. Anyhow, I now know better than to buy additional coverage in the future (for the types of submissions I conduct anyhow). It simply wouldn't pay off in the event of a loss.

  • 1951WheatiesPremium1951WheatiesPremium Posts: 3,288 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @bobbybakeriv said:

    @daltex said:

    @JoeBanzai said:

    @1951WheatiesPremium said:

    @JoeBanzai said:

    @sjjs28 said:
    Wishing you nothing but the best - but just wanted to recant an experience I had many years ago ...
    A group of my buddies and I were submitting cherry picked cards from the Bonds Rookies' era.
    150 of the best of the best - boxed up and sent to PSA (and insured!!) -
    Never made it. Never heard from it again - all these many years.

    Search and investigated and no one could locate it (stolen??)

    Here's the fun part - we insured if for $1000 - $1500, don't really remember anymore.
    Guess what happened when we tried to collect on the insurance??
    USPS wanted an accounting what was inside - no problem: we had a line by line inventory
    Next they wanted to know the value of what was lost - we estimated the value at $25 - $50 each. Should be pretty close if they 9 or 10's as we expected.
    Well the post office didn't want to hear any of that .... they told us the cards were worth $0.01 or a $0.10 based on their information - they were ready to cut a check for $15 to settle the claim. Bogus
    We tried to explain how the intricacies of the PSA grading system worked and how the cards were much more valuable and just any example of that (those) cards once they were graded. Not flying.
    We told them to choke on their $15.00

    Here's the point of the story -
    I hope you insured them and maybe went as far as taking pictures -
    But unfortunately they were heading to California, not returning from California.
    If it was the other way around - the replacement value would be easier to ascertain.
    If they are not found and If a claim is made, you can throw out all of the care you took to hi-grade for the "best" and assume
    "pennies on the card" vs. what you valued them for...

    Good Luck

    I realize i will lose the argument, but why on earth should you have to prove the value of anything you insure after the item is lost by the insurer? The insurance was purchased at the rate determined (in these cases) by the USPS, if they lose the package they should issue the insurance amount purchased. Seems like fraud to me.

    If they enter into an agreement like this and want proof of value, it should be done prior to the purchase.

    Legal experts, what am I missing?

    Insurance is for ‘up to‘ and in this case, they’re going to do their own valuations.

    PS - They’re right; ungraded cards hold very little value when compared with graded, right? It’s why we all send cards there...

    OK, so insuring cards is a waste of time. Since they are basically lying to you about covering your losses, why not keep a receipt for an expensive item and claim it's that?

    To my way of thinking, when you pay for a specific amount of insurance THAT'S what you should get if it's lost. NOT whatever the insurer decides it's worth.................without ever seeing the item.

    WHAT A CROCK OF CHIT!

    To my way of thinking, insurance should cover exactly what the contract says it will cover. It is not the USPS's fault if you buy their product without reading or understanding the contract. If I recall correctly, you've twice on this thread suggested resorting to insurance fraud to be "made whole". I have little doubt, but no hard evidence, that this is a federal crime. All it takes is for the package to turn up after you've been compensated for the fraudulently claimed contents, and you're in a heap of trouble.

    I get what you are saying and I certainly don't condone any type of fraud. However, every time I have purchased insurance via the USPS, it has been at the counter and I was not once explicitly asked to sign a "contract." The employee simply asks 'would you like additional insurance?' to which I respond 'yes' and the amount. I am sure it is in the fine print somewhere but I have never been pointed to a contract nor explanation of the process. I did not know that in the case of loss, the USPS then determines the value irrespective of how much insurance you purchased. This seems to be poor customer service at the least to me. After all, they do charge you for the value you estimate the items to be worth and price their coverage accordingly. It seems shady to then decide the value estimation was not accurate after you've paid for the coverage. Anyhow, I now know better than to buy additional coverage in the future (for the types of submissions I conduct anyhow). It simply wouldn't pay off in the event of a loss.

    For the record, this is when shipping raw cards to PSA only.

    If a card is already graded, I would think it has a more clearly defined and quantified value and therefore USPS insurance would be much more worthwhile.

    My only point was many people send in cards (of all eras and types) that fall short of PSA’s expectations and standards.

    So if you are sending a 1993 Topps Jeter that you think is a 10 but it comes back a 7, it’s a difference in value from call it $500 at PSA 10 to call it...what at PSA 7?

    Curious about the rare, mysterious and beautiful 1951 Wheaties Premium Photos?

    https://forums.collectors.com/discussion/987963/1951-wheaties-premium-photos-set-registry#latest

  • dad2cl3dad2cl3 Posts: 331 ✭✭✭✭

    Sounds like car insurance. Pay out is equal to the appraised value of the loss determined by the insurance company. It is not paid based on the car owner’s determination of the loss.

    Jason

  • JoeBanzaiJoeBanzai Posts: 8,279 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @daltex said:

    @JoeBanzai said:

    @1951WheatiesPremium said:

    @JoeBanzai said:

    @sjjs28 said:
    Wishing you nothing but the best - but just wanted to recant an experience I had many years ago ...
    A group of my buddies and I were submitting cherry picked cards from the Bonds Rookies' era.
    150 of the best of the best - boxed up and sent to PSA (and insured!!) -
    Never made it. Never heard from it again - all these many years.

    Search and investigated and no one could locate it (stolen??)

    Here's the fun part - we insured if for $1000 - $1500, don't really remember anymore.
    Guess what happened when we tried to collect on the insurance??
    USPS wanted an accounting what was inside - no problem: we had a line by line inventory
    Next they wanted to know the value of what was lost - we estimated the value at $25 - $50 each. Should be pretty close if they 9 or 10's as we expected.
    Well the post office didn't want to hear any of that .... they told us the cards were worth $0.01 or a $0.10 based on their information - they were ready to cut a check for $15 to settle the claim. Bogus
    We tried to explain how the intricacies of the PSA grading system worked and how the cards were much more valuable and just any example of that (those) cards once they were graded. Not flying.
    We told them to choke on their $15.00

    Here's the point of the story -
    I hope you insured them and maybe went as far as taking pictures -
    But unfortunately they were heading to California, not returning from California.
    If it was the other way around - the replacement value would be easier to ascertain.
    If they are not found and If a claim is made, you can throw out all of the care you took to hi-grade for the "best" and assume
    "pennies on the card" vs. what you valued them for...

    Good Luck

    I realize i will lose the argument, but why on earth should you have to prove the value of anything you insure after the item is lost by the insurer? The insurance was purchased at the rate determined (in these cases) by the USPS, if they lose the package they should issue the insurance amount purchased. Seems like fraud to me.

    If they enter into an agreement like this and want proof of value, it should be done prior to the purchase.

    Legal experts, what am I missing?

    Insurance is for ‘up to‘ and in this case, they’re going to do their own valuations.

    PS - They’re right; ungraded cards hold very little value when compared with graded, right? It’s why we all send cards there...

    OK, so insuring cards is a waste of time. Since they are basically lying to you about covering your losses, why not keep a receipt for an expensive item and claim it's that?

    To my way of thinking, when you pay for a specific amount of insurance THAT'S what you should get if it's lost. NOT whatever the insurer decides it's worth.................without ever seeing the item.

    WHAT A CROCK OF CHIT!

    To my way of thinking, insurance should cover exactly what the contract says it will cover. It is not the USPS's fault if you buy their product without reading or understanding the contract. If I recall correctly, you've twice on this thread suggested resorting to insurance fraud to be "made whole". I have little doubt, but no hard evidence, that this is a federal crime. All it takes is for the package to turn up after you've been compensated for the fraudulently claimed contents, and you're in a heap of trouble.

    I do not condone fraud.

    The postal employee asks if you want to purchase insurance and asks you how much you want to insure the package for without saying you will have to prove the value of the packages contents if they lose it. This certainly is a poor way to sell a service. There certainly is an implication that you will receive the amount that you "purchase".

    It certainly seems that in the example given the USPS is going to completely rip you off. They simply are not going to try to come to any kind of fair value for your items that they lost.

    It really shouldn't matter what your item is actually worth. You pay more money for more insurance and since they are the ones selling the insurance to protect you from a loss because of their failure to deliver they should simply pay out the amount that you have agreed upon.

    Insurance companies are allowed to collect your money and then decide not to pay when you make a claim. Not really the way it should work, especially when they also charge you ahead of time to make up for the fraudulent claims they do occasionally pay out.

    Basically there's seems to be no good reason to EVER buy insurance from the USPS from everything I have heard, unless you have proof of value ahead of time. This would seem to be nearly impossible when sending cards in for grading.

    Remember, I said I would lose the argument. ;-)

    2013,14 and 15 Certificate Award Winner Harmon Killebrew Master Set and Master Topps Set
  • grote15grote15 Posts: 28,100 ✭✭✭✭✭

    It's virtually useless to insure raw cards as in many cases they are worth a fraction of what they would be worth potentially after grading (assuming they grade) and it is often difficult to provide purchase documentation to prove value.



    Collecting 1970s Topps baseball wax, rack and cello packs, as well as PCGS graded Half Cents, Large Cents, Two Cent pieces and Three Cent Silver pieces.
  • JoeBanzaiJoeBanzai Posts: 8,279 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @dad2cl3 said:
    Sounds like car insurance. Pay out is equal to the appraised value of the loss determined by the insurance company. It is not paid based on the car owner’s determination of the loss.

    Jason

    Generally you should make out ok on car insurance as there is a "blue book" value on a vehicle. In this case the insurer makes their decision.......................how?

    2013,14 and 15 Certificate Award Winner Harmon Killebrew Master Set and Master Topps Set
  • JoeBanzaiJoeBanzai Posts: 8,279 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @1951WheatiesPremium said:

    @bobbybakeriv said:

    @daltex said:

    @JoeBanzai said:

    @1951WheatiesPremium said:

    @JoeBanzai said:

    @sjjs28 said:
    Wishing you nothing but the best - but just wanted to recant an experience I had many years ago ...
    A group of my buddies and I were submitting cherry picked cards from the Bonds Rookies' era.
    150 of the best of the best - boxed up and sent to PSA (and insured!!) -
    Never made it. Never heard from it again - all these many years.

    Search and investigated and no one could locate it (stolen??)

    Here's the fun part - we insured if for $1000 - $1500, don't really remember anymore.
    Guess what happened when we tried to collect on the insurance??
    USPS wanted an accounting what was inside - no problem: we had a line by line inventory
    Next they wanted to know the value of what was lost - we estimated the value at $25 - $50 each. Should be pretty close if they 9 or 10's as we expected.
    Well the post office didn't want to hear any of that .... they told us the cards were worth $0.01 or a $0.10 based on their information - they were ready to cut a check for $15 to settle the claim. Bogus
    We tried to explain how the intricacies of the PSA grading system worked and how the cards were much more valuable and just any example of that (those) cards once they were graded. Not flying.
    We told them to choke on their $15.00

    Here's the point of the story -
    I hope you insured them and maybe went as far as taking pictures -
    But unfortunately they were heading to California, not returning from California.
    If it was the other way around - the replacement value would be easier to ascertain.
    If they are not found and If a claim is made, you can throw out all of the care you took to hi-grade for the "best" and assume
    "pennies on the card" vs. what you valued them for...

    Good Luck

    I realize i will lose the argument, but why on earth should you have to prove the value of anything you insure after the item is lost by the insurer? The insurance was purchased at the rate determined (in these cases) by the USPS, if they lose the package they should issue the insurance amount purchased. Seems like fraud to me.

    If they enter into an agreement like this and want proof of value, it should be done prior to the purchase.

    Legal experts, what am I missing?

    Insurance is for ‘up to‘ and in this case, they’re going to do their own valuations.

    PS - They’re right; ungraded cards hold very little value when compared with graded, right? It’s why we all send cards there...

    OK, so insuring cards is a waste of time. Since they are basically lying to you about covering your losses, why not keep a receipt for an expensive item and claim it's that?

    To my way of thinking, when you pay for a specific amount of insurance THAT'S what you should get if it's lost. NOT whatever the insurer decides it's worth.................without ever seeing the item.

    WHAT A CROCK OF CHIT!

    To my way of thinking, insurance should cover exactly what the contract says it will cover. It is not the USPS's fault if you buy their product without reading or understanding the contract. If I recall correctly, you've twice on this thread suggested resorting to insurance fraud to be "made whole". I have little doubt, but no hard evidence, that this is a federal crime. All it takes is for the package to turn up after you've been compensated for the fraudulently claimed contents, and you're in a heap of trouble.

    I get what you are saying and I certainly don't condone any type of fraud. However, every time I have purchased insurance via the USPS, it has been at the counter and I was not once explicitly asked to sign a "contract." The employee simply asks 'would you like additional insurance?' to which I respond 'yes' and the amount. I am sure it is in the fine print somewhere but I have never been pointed to a contract nor explanation of the process. I did not know that in the case of loss, the USPS then determines the value irrespective of how much insurance you purchased. This seems to be poor customer service at the least to me. After all, they do charge you for the value you estimate the items to be worth and price their coverage accordingly. It seems shady to then decide the value estimation was not accurate after you've paid for the coverage. Anyhow, I now know better than to buy additional coverage in the future (for the types of submissions I conduct anyhow). It simply wouldn't pay off in the event of a loss.

    For the record, this is when shipping raw cards to PSA only.

    If a card is already graded, I would think it has a more clearly defined and quantified value and therefore USPS insurance would be much more worthwhile.

    My only point was many people send in cards (of all eras and types) that fall short of PSA’s expectations and standards.

    So if you are sending a 1993 Topps Jeter that you think is a 10 but it comes back a 7, it’s a difference in value from call it $500 at PSA 10 to call it...what at PSA 7?

    Yes I was talking about raw cards. The question is, what exactly is that Jeter card worth? You don't know until it gets the grade.

    I see some of Jeter's raw cards sell for $500.00. Do you think the USPS would pay that? Would you then have to prove that there was actually a 1993 Jeter S/P card in the package?

    2013,14 and 15 Certificate Award Winner Harmon Killebrew Master Set and Master Topps Set
  • dad2cl3dad2cl3 Posts: 331 ✭✭✭✭

    @JoeBanzai said:

    @dad2cl3 said:
    Sounds like car insurance. Pay out is equal to the appraised value of the loss determined by the insurance company. It is not paid based on the car owner’s determination of the loss.

    Jason

    Generally you should make out ok on car insurance as there is a "blue book" value on a vehicle. In this case the insurer makes their decision.......................how?

    In lieu of documented valuation of the items lost, they likely have some default valuation that they fall back on.

    Jason

  • blurryfaceblurryface Posts: 2,222 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @JoeBanzai said:

    @1951WheatiesPremium said:

    @JoeBanzai said:

    @sjjs28 said:
    Wishing you nothing but the best - but just wanted to recant an experience I had many years ago ...
    A group of my buddies and I were submitting cherry picked cards from the Bonds Rookies' era.
    150 of the best of the best - boxed up and sent to PSA (and insured!!) -
    Never made it. Never heard from it again - all these many years.

    Search and investigated and no one could locate it (stolen??)

    Here's the fun part - we insured if for $1000 - $1500, don't really remember anymore.
    Guess what happened when we tried to collect on the insurance??
    USPS wanted an accounting what was inside - no problem: we had a line by line inventory
    Next they wanted to know the value of what was lost - we estimated the value at $25 - $50 each. Should be pretty close if they 9 or 10's as we expected.
    Well the post office didn't want to hear any of that .... they told us the cards were worth $0.01 or a $0.10 based on their information - they were ready to cut a check for $15 to settle the claim. Bogus
    We tried to explain how the intricacies of the PSA grading system worked and how the cards were much more valuable and just any example of that (those) cards once they were graded. Not flying.
    We told them to choke on their $15.00

    Here's the point of the story -
    I hope you insured them and maybe went as far as taking pictures -
    But unfortunately they were heading to California, not returning from California.
    If it was the other way around - the replacement value would be easier to ascertain.
    If they are not found and If a claim is made, you can throw out all of the care you took to hi-grade for the "best" and assume
    "pennies on the card" vs. what you valued them for...

    Good Luck

    I realize i will lose the argument, but why on earth should you have to prove the value of anything you insure after the item is lost by the insurer? The insurance was purchased at the rate determined (in these cases) by the USPS, if they lose the package they should issue the insurance amount purchased. Seems like fraud to me.

    If they enter into an agreement like this and want proof of value, it should be done prior to the purchase.

    Legal experts, what am I missing?

    Insurance is for ‘up to‘ and in this case, they’re going to do their own valuations.

    PS - They’re right; ungraded cards hold very little value when compared with graded, right? It’s why we all send cards there...

    why not keep a receipt for an expensive item and claim it's that?

    >

    because thats insurance fraud punishable by imprisonment and hefty fines.

    the best ability is availability.

  • JoeBanzaiJoeBanzai Posts: 8,279 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @dad2cl3 said:

    @JoeBanzai said:

    @dad2cl3 said:
    Sounds like car insurance. Pay out is equal to the appraised value of the loss determined by the insurance company. It is not paid based on the car owner’s determination of the loss.

    Jason

    Generally you should make out ok on car insurance as there is a "blue book" value on a vehicle. In this case the insurer makes their decision.......................how?

    In lieu of documented valuation of the items lost, they likely have some default valuation that they fall back on.

    Jason

    The poster above who actually filed a claim said "pennies on the dollar" of course he might be biased.

    I wonder if the "default valuation" is one tenth the cost of a pack of baseball cards. You could make a great argument for that.

    This is why I go back to the valuation that's made when the salesperson asks you how much insurance you want to pay for and then charges you for that much.

    2013,14 and 15 Certificate Award Winner Harmon Killebrew Master Set and Master Topps Set
  • dad2cl3dad2cl3 Posts: 331 ✭✭✭✭
  • JoeBanzaiJoeBanzai Posts: 8,279 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @blurryface said:

    @JoeBanzai said:

    @1951WheatiesPremium said:

    @JoeBanzai said:

    @sjjs28 said:
    Wishing you nothing but the best - but just wanted to recant an experience I had many years ago ...
    A group of my buddies and I were submitting cherry picked cards from the Bonds Rookies' era.
    150 of the best of the best - boxed up and sent to PSA (and insured!!) -
    Never made it. Never heard from it again - all these many years.

    Search and investigated and no one could locate it (stolen??)

    Here's the fun part - we insured if for $1000 - $1500, don't really remember anymore.
    Guess what happened when we tried to collect on the insurance??
    USPS wanted an accounting what was inside - no problem: we had a line by line inventory
    Next they wanted to know the value of what was lost - we estimated the value at $25 - $50 each. Should be pretty close if they 9 or 10's as we expected.
    Well the post office didn't want to hear any of that .... they told us the cards were worth $0.01 or a $0.10 based on their information - they were ready to cut a check for $15 to settle the claim. Bogus
    We tried to explain how the intricacies of the PSA grading system worked and how the cards were much more valuable and just any example of that (those) cards once they were graded. Not flying.
    We told them to choke on their $15.00

    Here's the point of the story -
    I hope you insured them and maybe went as far as taking pictures -
    But unfortunately they were heading to California, not returning from California.
    If it was the other way around - the replacement value would be easier to ascertain.
    If they are not found and If a claim is made, you can throw out all of the care you took to hi-grade for the "best" and assume
    "pennies on the card" vs. what you valued them for...

    Good Luck

    I realize i will lose the argument, but why on earth should you have to prove the value of anything you insure after the item is lost by the insurer? The insurance was purchased at the rate determined (in these cases) by the USPS, if they lose the package they should issue the insurance amount purchased. Seems like fraud to me.

    If they enter into an agreement like this and want proof of value, it should be done prior to the purchase.

    Legal experts, what am I missing?

    Insurance is for ‘up to‘ and in this case, they’re going to do their own valuations.

    PS - They’re right; ungraded cards hold very little value when compared with graded, right? It’s why we all send cards there...

    why not keep a receipt for an expensive item and claim it's that?

    >

    because thats insurance fraud punishable by imprisonment and hefty fines.

    Well, I would never do that. What I won't ever do again is buy insurance from the USPS.

    2013,14 and 15 Certificate Award Winner Harmon Killebrew Master Set and Master Topps Set
  • JoeBanzaiJoeBanzai Posts: 8,279 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @dad2cl3 said:
    Here’s the link to their indemnity terms. https://pe.usps.com/text/dmm300/609.htm#ep1098416

    Jason

    Thank you. Looks like there's absolutely no reason to purchase insurance EVER from the USPS.

    You MIGHT be covered if you are a seller of a card and can use the ebay transaction as proof of value.

    Just curious..........What about the 1960 Post Killebrew I sent to PSA for grading that I bought 20 years ago and PSA just started grading?

    No, I don't have the receipt.

    2013,14 and 15 Certificate Award Winner Harmon Killebrew Master Set and Master Topps Set
  • blurryfaceblurryface Posts: 2,222 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @JoeBanzai said:

    @blurryface said:

    @JoeBanzai said:

    @1951WheatiesPremium said:

    @JoeBanzai said:

    @sjjs28 said:
    Wishing you nothing but the best - but just wanted to recant an experience I had many years ago ...
    A group of my buddies and I were submitting cherry picked cards from the Bonds Rookies' era.
    150 of the best of the best - boxed up and sent to PSA (and insured!!) -
    Never made it. Never heard from it again - all these many years.

    Search and investigated and no one could locate it (stolen??)

    Here's the fun part - we insured if for $1000 - $1500, don't really remember anymore.
    Guess what happened when we tried to collect on the insurance??
    USPS wanted an accounting what was inside - no problem: we had a line by line inventory
    Next they wanted to know the value of what was lost - we estimated the value at $25 - $50 each. Should be pretty close if they 9 or 10's as we expected.
    Well the post office didn't want to hear any of that .... they told us the cards were worth $0.01 or a $0.10 based on their information - they were ready to cut a check for $15 to settle the claim. Bogus
    We tried to explain how the intricacies of the PSA grading system worked and how the cards were much more valuable and just any example of that (those) cards once they were graded. Not flying.
    We told them to choke on their $15.00

    Here's the point of the story -
    I hope you insured them and maybe went as far as taking pictures -
    But unfortunately they were heading to California, not returning from California.
    If it was the other way around - the replacement value would be easier to ascertain.
    If they are not found and If a claim is made, you can throw out all of the care you took to hi-grade for the "best" and assume
    "pennies on the card" vs. what you valued them for...

    Good Luck

    I realize i will lose the argument, but why on earth should you have to prove the value of anything you insure after the item is lost by the insurer? The insurance was purchased at the rate determined (in these cases) by the USPS, if they lose the package they should issue the insurance amount purchased. Seems like fraud to me.

    If they enter into an agreement like this and want proof of value, it should be done prior to the purchase.

    Legal experts, what am I missing?

    Insurance is for ‘up to‘ and in this case, they’re going to do their own valuations.

    PS - They’re right; ungraded cards hold very little value when compared with graded, right? It’s why we all send cards there...

    why not keep a receipt for an expensive item and claim it's that?

    >

    because thats insurance fraud punishable by imprisonment and hefty fines.

    Well, I would never do that. What I won't ever do again is buy insurance from the USPS.

    both are equally great ideas.

    the best ability is availability.

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