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Fifty years ago today, 11/9/67, the first Saturn V flew.

SkyManSkyMan Posts: 9,493 ✭✭✭✭✭
edited November 9, 2017 10:47PM in U.S. Coin Forum

Fifty years ago today, 11/9/67, the first Saturn V flew. This was the rocket that allowed the US to send men to the Moon. It stood taller than the Statue of Liberty, was more massive than six Boeing 747 jetliners and generated more thrust than two dozen of the jumbo jets.

Now the US can't even launch a human to low Earth orbit. We have to pay the Russians to take us up to the International Space Station.

Post a coin from 1967 or one that has a space based theme.


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    SaorAlbaSaorAlba Posts: 7,481 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Space exploration became an ugly red headed step child of the US government beginning in the late 1970s and eventually NASA will cease to exist. Roskomos will rule, and you wonder who won the space race?

    In memory of my kitty Seryozha 14.2.1996 ~ 13.9.2016 and Shadow 3.4.2015 - 16.4.21
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    1630Boston1630Boston Posts: 13,772 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @SkyMan
    Great to remind us all of 'our' collective endeavors and successes in the past. Great lift off photo. :smile:
    Thanks for sharing it :smile:

    Successful transactions with : MICHAELDIXON, Manorcourtman, Bochiman, bolivarshagnasty, AUandAG, onlyroosies, chumley, Weiss, jdimmick, BAJJERFAN, gene1978, TJM965, Smittys, GRANDAM, JTHawaii, mainejoe, softparade, derryb

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    rickoricko Posts: 98,724 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Such a great period in American ingenuity and progress.... sad that the space program was crushed by politics. Cheers, RickO

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    CaptHenwayCaptHenway Posts: 31,563 ✭✭✭✭✭

    A mighty bird. Saw the one on display at the Smithsonian. Sad that we could not build one today if we had the guts to do so.

    Numismatist. 50 year member ANA. Winner of four ANA Heath Literary Awards; three Wayte and Olga Raymond Literary Awards; Numismatist of the Year Award 2009, and Lifetime Achievement Award 2020. Winner numerous NLG Literary Awards.
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    tincuptincup Posts: 4,785 ✭✭✭✭✭

    It's been quite a few years ago... but on a trip to Johnson Space Center there was one displayed outside lying down on the ground; one could walk up to it, around it and touch it. It is a vivid memory of standing next to the rocket thruster end, just the sheer magnitude of it. AWESOME is the only word I could come up with, that man could build such a thing...

    ----- kj
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    BobSavBobSav Posts: 913 ✭✭✭

    Wow I feel really old now, I was in grade school when that happened.
    Here's to the men that had the balls to get on top of that thing and take it for a ride,
    Bob

    Past transactions with:
    Lordmarcovan, WTCG, YogiBerraFan, Phoenin21, LindeDad, Coll3ctor, blue594, robkoll, Mike Dixon, BloodMan, Flakthat and others.
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    cmerlo1cmerlo1 Posts: 7,891 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @tincup said:
    It's been quite a few years ago... but on a trip to Johnson Space Center there was one displayed outside lying down on the ground; one could walk up to it, around it and touch it. It is a vivid memory of standing next to the rocket thruster end, just the sheer magnitude of it. AWESOME is the only word I could come up with, that man could build such a thing...

    I remember seeing that one also.

    You Suck! Awarded 6/2008- 1901-O Micro O Morgan, 8/2008- 1878 VAM-123 Morgan, 9/2022 1888-O VAM-1B3 H8 Morgan | Senior Regional Representative- ANACS Coin Grading. Posted opinions on coins are my own, and are not an official ANACS opinion.
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    SanctionIISanctionII Posts: 11,725 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Sad it is that the USA today cannot duplicate what it accomplshed 40-50 years ago. Even if the USA had the will and desire to send people back to the moon, the red tape and cost of doing so would be orders of magnitude higher than what the red tape and cost of doing so was in the 50's, 60's and early 70's.

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    SkyManSkyMan Posts: 9,493 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @SaorAlba said:
    Space exploration became an ugly red headed step child of the US government beginning in the late 1970s and eventually NASA will cease to exist. Roskomos will rule, and you wonder who won the space race?

    I'd disagree with your statement for several reasons. First, NASA will continue, because what US government department has ever been killed off? Second, for all it's faults, NASA still continues to CRUSH Russia with regards to unmanned space exploration. NO Russian space probe has successfully made it out of low earth orbit (except one, an orbiter of Mars that launched in 2016, that was a joint project with the European Space Agency, ESA). That's 25 years and counting.

    From 1992 to the present the US has sent 6 probes to study the Sun (plus another 4 in conjunction with ESA); 1 orbiting probe to Mercury; 1 orbiting probe to Venus; 4 orbiters, 2 landers and 4 rovers to Mars; 2 flyby probes and 2 orbiter probes to the asteroids; 2 orbiting probes of Jupiter (one of which included some instruments from the German Space Agency); 1 orbiting probe of Saturn (with some instruments from ESA and the Italian Space Agency); 1 flyby probe of Pluto; and 4 flyby missions to comets. In addition to all these mentioned missions, arguably the most important of all NASA projects was the Hubble Space Telescope. Many other satellites/probes have also to be considered, such as the Kepler spacecraft, designed to find planets around other stars.

    Russia continues to do what it (and the USSR) have been doing for 40 years, orbiting the Earth in low Earth orbit (LEO) in a manned space station. Of particular note has been their development of waste water recycling (e.g. urine etc.). This is good useful research, and of Great importance to long term spaceflight, but this was pretty much figured out by the mid-1990's (solely by the Russians, e.g. the US engineers could not figure out a spaceworthy way to do it). Realistically, since the construction of the International Space Station (ISS), most of the science from the ISS has been generated by the US, ESA or the Japanese Space Agency.

    Looking 10 years in the future, the great up and coming space agency will be the Chinese Space Agency. The Chinese have committed to launching a manned space station, Tiangong, that is roughly 1/6 the size of the ISS. Launch is tentatively scheduled for 2019. The Chinese have also stated that they plan to land people on the Moon by 2036. India is also an up and coming space power, but it's plans are not as grandiose as China's.

    One thing that can be said about ALL national space programs is that the deadlines tend to slip. This is a function of both funding, and the actual difficulty of the science needed to get a functioning payload to the appropriate destination. It is after all called rocket science for a reason.

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    OldEastsideOldEastside Posts: 4,602 ✭✭✭✭✭

    My Dakota and a Rocketdyne F-1 about a block away from my house

    Steve

    Promote the Hobby
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    PTVETTERPTVETTER Posts: 5,882 ✭✭✭✭✭

    50 years age I was finishing my advance training before going overseas!
    Doesn't seem that long ago. how times flies!

    Pat Vetter,Mercury Dime registry set,1938 Proof set registry,Pat & BJ Coins:724-325-7211


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    Lego released a Saturn V set this year and it’s a fantastic build. I have it on display along with my large US Mint New Frontier medal.

    No one has been on the moon in my lifetime. It’s sad, really.

    Radiant Collection: Numismatics and Exonumia of the Atomic Age.
    https://www.pcgs.com/setregistry/showcase/3232

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