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2009 professional life, missing window?

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    BillDugan1959BillDugan1959 Posts: 3,821 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 1, 2017 1:52AM

    There is a limestone portico projecting out from the side of the building there and in reality there is a door (not a window) in that spot. The door is heavy solid wood in reality, with perhaps a bit of glass in the top of the frame.

    Go to google images and type in 'Old State Capitol Illinois' and you will find many photographic images from that angle. This building, from Lincoln's lifetime, still exists today. It was used, with many alterations, for about eight decades after Lincoln's death as the Sangamon County Courthouse, and then taken down and totally reconstructed in the 1960s to be exactly as it was about 1860.

    The absence of a minor building design element in the coin is meaningless if all the coins are that way.

    Simply, the coin designers were probably trying to best suggest how the portico juts out from the rest of the building - not easy to show this three dimensional reality in an almost two dimensional coin surface.

    FWIW, when they released the coins in a public ceremony in the fall of 2009, this photo also shows the south east corner of the lawn where the distribution tent stood.

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    rickoricko Posts: 98,724 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @BillDugan1959 .... Thanks for the detail and picture.... Cheers, RickO

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    dagingerbeastttdagingerbeasttt Posts: 784 ✭✭✭✭

    @BillDugan1959 said:

    There is a limestone portico projecting out from the side of the building there and in reality there is a door (not a window) in that spot. The door is heavy solid wood in reality, with perhaps a bit of glass in the top of the frame.

    Go to google images and type in 'Old State Capitol Illinois' and you will find many photographic images from that angle. This building, from Lincoln's lifetime, still exists today. It was used, with many alterations, for about eight decades after Lincoln's death as the Sangamon County Courthouse, and then taken down and totally reconstructed in the 1960s to be exactly as it was about 1860.

    The absence of a minor building design element in the coin is meaningless if all the coins are that way.

    Simply, the coin designers were probably trying to best suggest how the portico juts out from the rest of the building - not easy to show this three dimensional reality in an almost two dimensional coin surface.

    FWIW, when they released the coins in a public ceremony in the fall of 2009, this photo also shows the south east corner of the lawn where the distribution tent stood.

    But the coins for this are supposed to have the window there even though it's a door in real life so I'm still confused but I appreciate all the details is very interesting

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    TommyTypeTommyType Posts: 4,586 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I don't have an answer....

    But I will say that I'm just very impressed by how closely and meticulously you look at your coins!

    I'm not kidding, or pulling your leg. It's that kind of attention to detail that identifies all of those errors and oddities that we now know about.

    Easily distracted Type Collector
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    dagingerbeastttdagingerbeasttt Posts: 784 ✭✭✭✭

    @TommyType said:
    I don't have an answer....

    But I will say that I'm just very impressed by how closely and meticulously you look at your coins!

    I'm not kidding, or pulling your leg. It's that kind of attention to detail that identifies all of those errors and oddities that we now know about.

    Thank you man ! I just enjoy over looking the coins and examinating them. Thanks for the words of encouragement!

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