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Is this a Case where a Improper Dip Rinse has Turned.

FairlanemanFairlaneman Posts: 10,408 ✭✭✭✭✭

Coin is in a Gen 2.2 Slab so it has been there for almost 28 years.



Thanks.
Ken

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    StuartStuart Posts: 9,761 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited October 20, 2017 3:28PM

    @Fairlaneman Ken, Either a Dip gone bad, or perhaps Environmental Damage due to moisture invading the slab.

    Appears that most of the damage is near the rim of the coin, closest to the outer edge of the slab which could be the moisture invasion entry point.


    Stuart

    Collect 18th & 19th Century US Type Coins, Silver Dollars, $20 Gold Double Eagles and World Crowns & Talers with High Eye Appeal

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    gripgrip Posts: 9,962 ✭✭✭✭✭

    After 28 years I would think it's more of a storage problem
    than dip.

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    Insider2Insider2 Posts: 14,452 ✭✭✭✭✭

    That is "flow" around the letter but wrong color for dip residue. Possibly contaminated rinse water.

    I have a wacky theory about the spots on the reverse. When coins are slabbed, the parts and coin are blown out with compressed air. I suspect moisture in the air line (in spite of the filters used) caused the spots as this is common.

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    PRECIOUSMENTALPRECIOUSMENTAL Posts: 961 ✭✭✭✭
    edited October 20, 2017 3:41PM

    AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA-CHOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!

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    davewesendavewesen Posts: 5,859 ✭✭✭✭✭

    right rear field looks like a fingerprint that took years to show up

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    Insider2Insider2 Posts: 14,452 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited October 20, 2017 3:48PM

    I'm from the "show me State." I've seen the assemblers blow out coins & cases in two different TPGS. :wink: I even asked about what I saw.

    Anyone with access to a large, commercial, filtered compressor can do a little experiment. Hold the hose pointed away from your face (backlit), squeeze the handle, and look at the fog that comes out of the nozzle. Sometimes when the air flow is stopped the end of the nozzle appears to smoke. Say what?

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    FairlanemanFairlaneman Posts: 10,408 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Here is another one in a 2.2 Slab. I have had these for less than a year and it is Hot and Dry around here. They came out of the Portland Oregon area which is Wet and Humid for most of the year. I would not be surprised if the guy I bought them from had them for many many years.



    Ken

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    Insider2Insider2 Posts: 14,452 ✭✭✭✭✭

    You're in luck. I'll bet they will upgrade to 65's after conservation.

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    FairlanemanFairlaneman Posts: 10,408 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Insider2 said:
    You're in luck. I'll bet they will upgrade to 65's after conservation.

    They will sell on Ebay before I play the Upgrade Game. 65 would not be worth the time or money.

    Ken

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    BroadstruckBroadstruck Posts: 30,497 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Both are still fully salvageable you just loose the old holders.

    To Err Is Human.... To Collect Err's Is Just Too Much Darn Tootin Fun!
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    WalkerfanWalkerfan Posts: 8,976 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Looks like dip residue to me.....probably exaggerated by the photos......I imagine it is not as readily apparent in hand.

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    Insider2Insider2 Posts: 14,452 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Disagree on both counts. Dip residue turns brown on silver. I have never seen foggy gray EXCEPT on a freshly dipped and dried proof when the baking soda wash and soap & water has dried on an improperly rinsed coin. it is then removed immediately with another rinse.

    Put one of those dimes under florescent light and the spots will "pop" your eyes out.

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    keetskeets Posts: 25,351 ✭✭✭✭✭

    the way I dip/rinse ends with the coins spending at least a week on a cloth diaper and covered. that amount of time will show any sign of an improper rinse, it doesn't take 28 years to manifest itself and it will usually be a gold tone. these coins show what I have seen on lots of Peace Dollars, PVC residue, but again that would be much worse after 28 years. that leads me to agree with environmental damage most probably from moisture/humidity.

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    OldIndianNutKaseOldIndianNutKase Posts: 2,700 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I suggest that you crack it and try to fix the issue with many of the great suggestions on this forum. Mine being a simple dip in acetone. And then resubmit if that makes sense for your objectives. Not a lot of money involved here.

    OINK

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    Insider2Insider2 Posts: 14,452 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @OldIndianNutKase said:
    I suggest that you crack it and try to fix the issue with many of the great suggestions on this forum. Mine being a simple dip in acetone. And then resubmit if that makes sense for your objectives. Not a lot of money involved here.

    OINK

    I agree. That's a good first step but it should have no effect on the spots. It WILL prepare the surface for the next step!

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    CoinCrazyPACoinCrazyPA Posts: 2,899 ✭✭✭✭

    @Insider2 said:
    That is "flow" around the letter but wrong color for dip residue. Possibly contaminated rinse water.

    I have a wacky theory about the spots on the reverse. When coins are slabbed, the parts and coin are blown out with compressed air. I suspect moisture in the air line (in spite of the filters used) caused the spots as this is common.

    Plus there can be oil and other contaminants in the air lines even with filters. I would think they use canned compressed air, like for blowing out your computers.

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    Insider2Insider2 Posts: 14,452 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @CoinCrazyPA said: "I would think they use canned compressed air, like for blowing out your computers."

    Good point about the oil; however, cans don't work because...a TPGS is a factory. Do you have any Idea how many coins are run through the four major TPGS's a day? I don't but I do know this. At one TPGS with each big milestone in production, the employees were taken out for a steak dinner. I was in town once and the manager of the department invited me along. Yummy! I don't recall if the occasion was for 3000 or 4000 coins slabbed. Sorry, I don't recall either if it was for one week or a month. :( Nevertheless, it was in 2002. That TPGS is a lot larger today.

    PS Hold your air can up to the light and see if you can see anything coming out. :wink:

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    rickoricko Posts: 98,724 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I agree with @Insider2 ...I have worked at factories that used compressed air for cleaning and other purposes...it was imperative that the air be clean. However, from time to time, oil and or moisture would get into the system (maintenance issues) and a bunch of product would be either ruined or subject to rework. Even if that residue does not show oil, it could still be moisture, which would also be full of contaminants. Cheers, RickO

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