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Why is my 1959 Nickel brown?

I have been busy filling in the empty slots in my Whitman Jefferson Nickels No. 1, 1938-1961. I purchased some missing nickels and one in particular looks odd.
It is the 1959. See if you can pick out the one about which I am talking. Any ideas why this coin would be this color? why one of these things is not like the rest.
in the picture are nickels 1958, 1957, 1959, 1965 and 1968

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    291fifth291fifth Posts: 23,936 ✭✭✭✭✭

    It probably spent many years buried in the ground.

    All glory is fleeting.
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    FredWeinbergFredWeinberg Posts: 5,720 ✭✭✭✭✭

    It's hard to tell from your photos,
    but if the '59 nickel isn't just discolored,
    there's a chance that it's on a mis-annealed
    planchet - the planchet, before it was struck,
    was mis-annealed in the annealing process.

    These are very common - I can buy them
    easily for $3 each raw in roll quantities.

    Retired Collector & Dealer in Major Mint Error Coins & Currency since the 1960's.Co-Author of Whitman's "100 Greatest U.S. Mint Error Coins", and the Error Coin Encyclopedia, Vols., III & IV. Retired Authenticator for Major Mint Errors
    for PCGS. A 49+-Year PNG Member...A full numismatist since 1972, retired in 2022
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    oih82w8oih82w8 Posts: 11,896 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited October 3, 2017 11:00AM

    For some odd reason the "gold watch scene" with Christopher Walken in Pulp Fiction came to mind...something to do with "brown".

    oih82w8 = Oh I Hate To Wait _defectus patientia_aka...Dr. Defecto - Curator of RMO's

    BST transactions: dbldie55, jayPem, 78saen, UltraHighRelief, nibanny, liefgold, FallGuy, lkeigwin, mbogoman, Sandman70gt, keets, joeykoins, ianrussell (@GC), EagleEye, ThePennyLady, GRANDAM, Ilikecolor, Gluggo, okiedude, Voyageur, LJenkins11, fastfreddie, ms70, pursuitofliberty, ZoidMeister,Coin Finder, GotTheBug, edwardjulio, Coinnmore...
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    WindycityWindycity Posts: 3,470 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Don't know the answer but I have rolls of uncirculated 1959 nickels that all have a darker color... nice mint luster but dark,

    <a target=new class=ftalternatingbarlinklarge href="http://www.mullencoins.com">Mullen Coins Website - Windycity Coin website
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    Thanks for the feedback. FredWeinberg, just to be clear, a planchet is the actual coin before it is struck with a die (or dies). Not the die itself. I am familiar with annealing of automotive parts, we usually do this to make them more workable. If a planchet is miss-annealed does that make it more difficult to strike? Metal less ductile and harder? If a planchet was miss-annealed I would expect to see less definition in the features that you are trying to impart on the surface. Or do I have this whole process mixed up.

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    Hey Windycity, do you just see that in 1959 nickels or other mint years as well?

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    FredWeinbergFredWeinberg Posts: 5,720 ✭✭✭✭✭

    A 'blank' is the disc that was just punched out of the planchet strip;
    A 'planchet' is that disc that went thru the upsetting mill process to
    give it a raised rim; making it easier to strike. (i.e.: - Type 1 Blank &
    Type 2 Planchet).

    Annealing softens the metal making it easier to strike - more metal
    flow into the recesses of the die, and less wear & tear on the die itself.

    Mis-Annealed means in most cases that the planchet was 'overheated'
    in the annealing process, and it can pick up trace elements of the metal
    from the planchet. RogerB can explain this in much better detail.

    Because of the striking pressure of about 60-75 Tons, a coin that has
    been mis-annealed isn't weakly struck, or produced with less detail.

    Hope this helps a bit.

    Retired Collector & Dealer in Major Mint Error Coins & Currency since the 1960's.Co-Author of Whitman's "100 Greatest U.S. Mint Error Coins", and the Error Coin Encyclopedia, Vols., III & IV. Retired Authenticator for Major Mint Errors
    for PCGS. A 49+-Year PNG Member...A full numismatist since 1972, retired in 2022
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    WindycityWindycity Posts: 3,470 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Frequently on on the 1959 coins... rarely on others.

    <a target=new class=ftalternatingbarlinklarge href="http://www.mullencoins.com">Mullen Coins Website - Windycity Coin website
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    Thank you for the explanation FredWeinberg, it does make sense

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    leothelyonleothelyon Posts: 8,356 ✭✭✭✭✭



    Leo

    The more qualities observed in a coin, the more desirable that coin becomes!

    My Jefferson Nickel Collection

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    Hey those are some nice looking nickels. But I suppose you hear that from everyone.

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    leothelyonleothelyon Posts: 8,356 ✭✭✭✭✭

    They're there to be appreciated but mainly to show that other dates exist. I think I have a 1959 but don't believe to have ever photographed it. Here's a dark 1998-P shown with a brilliant coin. For the life of me, I don't know why the reverse wasn't included.

    Leo

    The more qualities observed in a coin, the more desirable that coin becomes!

    My Jefferson Nickel Collection

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    TreashuntTreashunt Posts: 6,747 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Why is my 1959 Nickel brown?

    so many thoughts, so little time

    Frank

    BHNC #203

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    rickoricko Posts: 98,724 ✭✭✭✭✭

    In addition to Fred's explanation (likely the right one), I also have seen nickels found metal detecting to have that dark color.... Some soil types will do that.....Cheers, RickO

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    Thanks for the feedback.

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    OverdateOverdate Posts: 6,936 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I remember that in the early to mid 1960's, the 1959 "black beauty" nickels were well known and occasionally promoted.

    "At the Philadelphia Mint in 1959, a full batch of nickel planchets were left in the furnace too long during the annealing process. As a result the unique black appearance was created."
    https://cointalk.com/threads/1959-jefferson-nickel-improperly-annealed-black-beauty.250868/

    My Adolph A. Weinman signature :)

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    Very interesting. Thank you Overdate!

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