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New Safeclean coin cleaner AARRRGGG!

So I have been seeing this stuff all over being sold or asked about and it is not safe it is toxic to the surface of your coins! http://wonderoil.com/safeclean_coin_cleaner link to site Go to the site and scroll to the bottom of the page for befor and after pics and you will see a beautiful 1956 quarter that they destroyed. The product striped the toning and surface and shows serious areas of etching after the cleaning was done with this "safe" product. I am posting this because I do not want anyone to make the mistake of using this especially YNs and those new to the hobby, cleaning is always a topic of discussion, well folks you should not clean your coins and you should not clean your coins with this product unless you just want them to be face value.

Comments

  • BodinBodin Posts: 990 ✭✭✭
    Thank you for this post! I was just going to start looking for something to remove a few spots from some silver.
    Great heads up!
  • Bayard1908Bayard1908 Posts: 3,674 ✭✭✭
    Actually, I'd be curious to try that on some nickels that I've found metal detecting.
  • Timbuk3Timbuk3 Posts: 11,595 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Thanks for the heads-up !!!
    Timbuk3
  • CuKevinCuKevin Posts: 1,543 ✭✭✭
    The number of claims they make is a bit unbelievable. Thanks for the heads up!

    "Our new non toxic, non acidic, non caustic, non corrosive, non irritating, non abrasive and completely biodegradable coin cleaner. It is not a "quick dip" type cleaner. One 4 ounce bottle will make up to 32 ounces of cleaner and can clean hundreds of coins."

    "Proprietary formula is made from 100% botanical extracts."


    No thank you.
    Choice Numismatics www.ChoiceCoin.com

    CN eBay

    All of my collection is in a safe deposit box!


  • << <i>Actually, I'd be curious to try that on some nickels that I've found metal detecting. >>



    Go and get some emu oil and soak your dug up coins in it. It will loosen up all the dirt and gunk as emu oil has a very small particle size. That is why itis used in delivering meds transdermaly. Just make sure nothing else is in it. You can warm it up to increase the mobility and action of the oil. I still would like to see an MSDS sheet on the product. The company that makes this make makeup so someone must have liked nickels or they got the product on metal and noticed it cleaned it. The biggest problem I saw was the striped surface of all the coins they cleaned and the removed toning. I would like to know what the sniffer thinks of this stuff. You can find them on ebay also and see that they are selling a bunch of nickels that look glossy, not sure if they used the product on all the nickels but they could have. If they have and are not disclosing this they could be in for a world of problems as they also did not tell what testing and clinical trials they did to prove it is "safe" to use.


  • << <i>The number of claims they make is a bit unbelievable. Thanks for the heads up!

    "Our new non toxic, non acidic, non caustic, non corrosive, non irritating, non abrasive and completely biodegradable coin cleaner. It is not a "quick dip" type cleaner. One 4 ounce bottle will make up to 32 ounces of cleaner and can clean hundreds of coins."

    "Proprietary formula is made from 100% botanical extracts."


    No thank you. >>



    If it is as they claim why is it removing the toning from the coins? Acetone will not remove the toning from a silver quarter but their product will, how does that happen?
  • rickoricko Posts: 77,055 ✭✭✭✭✭
    If it removes tarnish, then it is removing surface material.....best to avoid it, unless, as someone mentioned above, it is used to clean dug coins....Cheers, RickO
  • roadrunnerroadrunner Posts: 28,216 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Sounds like it's safe for people to use.....not so much for the coins.
    Barbarous Relic No More, LSCC -GoldSeek--shadow stats--SafeHaven--321gold
  • SonorandesertratSonorandesertrat Posts: 5,516 ✭✭✭✭✭
    The principal ingredients, according to the MSDS sheet, are organic acids. Those compounds will solubilize metal ions and can easily damage the surface of a coin.
    Member: EAC, NBS, C4, CWTS, ANA

    RMR: 'Wer, wenn ich schriee, hörte mich denn aus der Engel Ordnungen?'

    CJ: 'No one!' [Ain't no angels in the coin biz]


  • << <i>The principal ingredients, according to the MSDS sheet, are organic acids. Those compounds will solubilize metal ions and can easily damage the surface of a coin. >>



    But but they claim it is non-acidic!
  • planetsteveplanetsteve Posts: 1,316 ✭✭✭
    How did you find the MSDS sheet? There are some solutions at Wizard Coin Supply I'm interested in, but it sure would be nice to know exactly what's in them.

    The issue I'd like to address is very dark or uneven golden toning of post-1965 clad coins. I've read here that the typical dip for silver coins delivers undesirable results on these; I've been meaning to start a new thread on that.
  • SonorandesertratSonorandesertrat Posts: 5,516 ✭✭✭✭✭
    For the MSDS sheet, go to the bottom of the firm's home page.


    Material Safety Data Sheet
    The following is a typical analysis of our emu oil :

    Product Identification: Emu Oil

    Uses: Emollient in skin care products

    Description:
    At 20 degrees C.(68 F.), emu oil is a semi solid white mass similar in body to a typical hand lotion.
    At 60 degrees C.(140 F.), it is a practically clear completely flow able, slightly yellow tinted liquid with almost no odor

    Boiling point: > 150 degrees

    Refractive index: 1.4569

    Vapor pressure: NA

    Acid value: Max. 0.50

    Flash point: >140 degrees

    Saponification value: 185-200

    Iodine value: 81

    Water content: 0.05%

    FFA's: 0.04%

    Anisidine value: 2

    Color: 0.1R 1.0Y

    Flavor: Bland

    Odor: None

    Specific gravity: 0.91g/ml

    Peroxide value: 0m Eq/1000ml (low peroxide value = long shelf life)

    Constituents (fatty acids)
    Mean content %

    C14:0 myristic 0.8
    C16:0 palmitic 21.5
    C16:1 palmitoleic 4.8
    C18:0 stearic 10.9
    C18:1 oleic 45.6
    C18:2 linoleic 13.9
    C18:3 linolenic 0.6


    Material Safety Data Sheet
    The following is a typical analysis of our emu oil :

    Product Identification: Emu Oil

    Uses: Emollient in skin care products

    Description:
    At 20 degrees C.(68 F.), emu oil is a semi solid white mass similar in body to a typical hand lotion.
    At 60 degrees C.(140 F.), it is a practically clear completely flow able, slightly yellow tinted liquid with almost no odor

    Boiling point: > 150 degrees

    Refractive index: 1.4569

    Vapor pressure: NA

    Acid value: Max. 0.50

    Flash point: >140 degrees

    Saponification value: 185-200

    Iodine value: 81

    Water content: 0.05%

    FFA's: 0.04%

    Anisidine value: 2

    Color: 0.1R 1.0Y

    Flavor: Bland

    Odor: None

    Specific gravity: 0.91g/ml

    Peroxide value: 0m Eq/1000ml (low peroxide value = long shelf life)

    Constituents (fatty acids)
    Mean content %

    C14:0 myristic 0.8
    C16:0 palmitic 21.5
    C16:1 palmitoleic 4.8
    C18:0 stearic 10.9
    C18:1 oleic 45.6
    C18:2 linoleic 13.9
    C18:3 linolenic 0.6

    (There can be as many as 25 total identified specific fatty acids in lesser amounts than those listed above in any given sample than those stated above. The complexity of emu oil can at times defy definition according to research.)
    _______________________________________________________________________

    Fatty acids are organic acids that are well known for their tendencies to bond with metal cations. It is true that they are not deemed hazardous to people. Coin surfaces are a different matter. [My observation. My Ph.D. is in inorganic and biological chemistry.]
    As an aside: The pH range for many types of soda is ca. 2.5-4.0, fairly acidic. Not hazardous when drunk in reasonable quantities, but many with expertise in metalwork will tell you that sodas can be used in a pinch to loosen frozen bolts, lightly etch metal, etc. And a dentist will tell you that acidic foods and drinks will slowly dissolve your tooth enamel (by leaching the calcium out).
    Member: EAC, NBS, C4, CWTS, ANA

    RMR: 'Wer, wenn ich schriee, hörte mich denn aus der Engel Ordnungen?'

    CJ: 'No one!' [Ain't no angels in the coin biz]
  • planetsteveplanetsteve Posts: 1,316 ✭✭✭
    Thanks SDR. I have a bachelor's in chemistry, which regrettably has suffered some oxidation itself from disuse. But I believe that the answer to LIC's comment is that the company probably believes that since no "strong acids" like hydrochloric or sulfuric acids are added to the product -- as I understand is done with some dipping products -- then they are justified making the (misleading) statement that it is "non acidic."
  • ms70ms70 Posts: 12,835 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I wonder if this would get past the sniffer.
  • Emu oil? How about the best whale oil? I understand they use it in space to keep mechanisms taken care of forever....

    Conservation products are no doubt top notch, a leading dealer said NCS uses Jewel luster at high temps., not sure what the dilution rates are. Still any dip causes some metal loss.
  • planetsteveplanetsteve Posts: 1,316 ✭✭✭
    What is this "sniffer" you guys mentioned?
  • topstuftopstuf Posts: 14,805 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Oil from the pineal gland of unicorns is the best coin cleaning solution.


  • << <i>What is this "sniffer" you guys mentioned? >>



    The grading services have a device designed to detect certain types of problem chemical residues on high value coins.
  • planetsteveplanetsteve Posts: 1,316 ✭✭✭
    Cool. Thanks puffer.


  • << <i>Oil from the pineal gland of unicorns is the best coin cleaning solution. >>



    OMG LMAOROF ouch to darn funny.


  • << <i>Thanks SDR. I have a bachelor's in chemistry, which regrettably has suffered some oxidation itself from disuse. But I believe that the answer to LIC's comment is that the company probably believes that since no "strong acids" like hydrochloric or sulfuric acids are added to the product -- as I understand is done with some dipping products -- then they are justified making the (misleading) statement that it is "non acidic." >>



    Thank you for that information SDR you da man. As to dips a good number of silver cleaners and dips use acidified thiourea such as Shine Bright silver dip. You chemist guys can have fun telling the people what tiiourea is ou ureac acid.


  • << <i>Oil from the pineal gland of unicorns is the best coin cleaning solution. >>



    Now that made my day! LOL
    BST References] oilstates2003, GoldCoin98
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