New book on Mercury Dimes, prepublication offer

kevinjkevinj Posts: 925 ✭✭✭
The Authoritative Reference on Mercury Dimes by Kevin Flynn and John Wexler is going to print now, and should be ready in the beginning of August. The book is 8 ½ by 11, 245 pages, softcover only. Retail is $39.95 plus shipping.

This book is being be published by Kyle Vick at Stanton Books. For dealer discounts for multiple copies, contact Kyle when the book is printed at (770) 640-5055.

The primary purpose of this book was to create a complete and comprehensive reference for the Mercury dime series including all die varieties, history, patterns, authentication of rare dates, date-by-date analysis, and historical documents.

In 1999, the authors published Treasure Hunting Mercury Dimes, which contained 59 doubled dies and 50 repunched mint marks (RPM). This book contains 64 doubled dies and 105 repunched mint marks. Only a few new doubled dies were added, but the number of RPMs was easily doubled. For each die variety listed, detailed macro photos make identification much easier. Most of the varieties include multiple photographs showing different details. Included also for each variety is a detailed description of the variety, diagnostics, including die markers such as die cracks, scratches, clashes which can make identifying the variety easier, pricing, and cross references.
Many archive letters were uncovered relative to the Mercury dimes and are included. This greatly helped in the analysis of the history section, especially for why the designs were chosen. A section is included on the sculptor the Mercury dime and an analysis of where he most likely chose the image for the obverse from.

The date-by-date section offers an analysis of each date including scarcity, striking characteristics, world history which occurred that year, hot topics, comments, current values, and the certified population counts from PCGS and NGC. This was done for both the coins struck for circulation and the proofs. An additional section describes the differences in the striking characteristics of the bands on the reverse, and shows examples of the different classifications.

An important addition to this book is an authentication section. There are several rare and expensive coins in the Mercury dime series, such as the 1916-D, 1921, 1921-D, 1942/1, and 1942/1-D. There have been many counterfeits generated over the years for this coins. This section provides detailed photographs of genuine coins, and presents die stages for many of these to help in identification. A section also covers all Mercury dime patterns, including a new pattern never before listed.

Retail for the softcover is $39.95. Prepublication is available until the book is printed and is $35.95 plus $5 for media shipping or $10 for first class shipping. To reserve your book at the prepublication price, send a check or money order to Kevin Flynn, P.O. Box 396, Lumberton, NJ 08048. Please email me at [email protected] to reserve a copy. See other books available at www.kevinjflynn.com.
Kevin J Flynn

Comments

  • rickoricko Posts: 67,856 ✭✭✭✭✭
    That sounds like an excellent book to have for reference... Cheers, RickO
  • pcunixpcunix Posts: 620


    << <i>As nice as books are, how about an eBook? That way there is no paper/printing/shipping costs, allowing you to to drop the price from, say, $40 to maybe $20? $25? >>



    I've suggested that before to Kevin and other authors and most of them are afraid of theft.

    I've sold ebooks and made good money from it. Yes, I assume there was some theft, but as there were no production costs other than my typing, I'm also sure that I made out far, far better than I would have otherwise. With a very esoteric subject (Unix Troubleshooting, anyone?) and a completely unknown author completely dependent on my own website, I cleared around $5,000 with zero outlay.

    Then I discovered Amazon and put it up there. I picked up a few hundred dollars more at $19.95 and then as sales dwindled off, reduced it to $2.99. I STILL get sales years later even though the book is totally out of date and I am still an unknown name. It's not much - $10 or so dribbling in now and then, but it adds up.

    There are so many advantages: easy revisions, good pictures, high profit - I think numismatic authors who won't do this are really being short sighted. Kevin, for example, could sell a package of all his books for several hundred dollars and he'd sell plenty. You can serialize ebooks so that if there is theft you can find the source but in my experience, it's too little to fret over.

    For existing books, you do have to consider reformatting for ebooks. If you just leave the same pagination, it can come out ugly - the e-versions of thee Cherry Pickers Guides are a good example of laziness producing a crappy result. Done right, however, you get something far better than a print book and there are now people who specialize in that kind of reformatting for fairly short money.

    I won't buy a print book now unless I HAVE to have it. Like this Merc book, for example: I'd buy an ebook version, but I don't need it enough to buy the print. It's not a matter of price; it's the convenience of having it on my iPad or phone wherever I am.

    But most numismatic authors are opposed and it will probably stay like that until the next generation.
  • lcoopielcoopie Posts: 8,248 ✭✭✭
    At this point I vastly prefer kindle books as they are so convenient
  • kevinjkevinj Posts: 925 ✭✭✭


    << <i>

    << <i>As nice as books are, how about an eBook? That way there is no paper/printing/shipping costs, allowing you to to drop the price from, say, $40 to maybe $20? $25? >>


    I've suggested that before to Kevin and other authors and most of them are afraid of theft.
    I've sold ebooks and made good money from it. Yes, I assume there was some theft, but as there were no production costs other than my typing, I'm also sure that I made out far, far better than I would have otherwise. With a very esoteric subject (Unix Troubleshooting, anyone?) and a completely unknown author completely dependent on my own website, I cleared around $5,000 with zero outlay.
    Then I discovered Amazon and put it up there. I picked up a few hundred dollars more at $19.95 and then as sales dwindled off, reduced it to $2.99. I STILL get sales years later even though the book is totally out of date and I am still an unknown name. It's not much - $10 or so dribbling in now and then, but it adds up.
    There are so many advantages: easy revisions, good pictures, high profit - I think numismatic authors who won't do this are really being short sighted. Kevin, for example, could sell a package of all his books for several hundred dollars and he'd sell plenty. You can serialize ebooks so that if there is theft you can find the source but in my experience, it's too little to fret over.
    For existing books, you do have to consider reformatting for ebooks. If you just leave the same pagination, it can come out ugly - the e-versions of thee Cherry Pickers Guides are a good example of laziness producing a crappy result. Done right, however, you get something far better than a print book and there are now people who specialize in that kind of reformatting for fairly short money.
    I won't buy a print book now unless I HAVE to have it. Like this Merc book, for example: I'd buy an ebook version, but I don't need it enough to buy the print. It's not a matter of price; it's the convenience of having it on my iPad or phone wherever I am.
    But most numismatic authors are opposed and it will probably stay like that until the next generation. >>



    I agree with many of your points you have laid out on the advantages of an ebook, and as I am a software engineer by trade, would not be that difficult to figure out.
    For me, it comes down to simple tradition, always felt that as this is a hobby, nothing like sitting down relaxing with a paper copy of a book and reading.

    Kevin
    Kevin J Flynn
  • kevinjkevinj Posts: 925 ✭✭✭


    << <i>

    << <i>I agree with many of your points you have laid out on the advantages of an ebook, and as I am a software engineer by trade, would not be that difficult to figure out.
    For me, it comes down to simple tradition, always felt that as this is a hobby, nothing like sitting down relaxing with a paper copy of a book and reading.
    Kevin >>


    As wonderful as tradition may be, your traditions don't necessarily align with mine. I haven't sat down and read a book in probably 10 years... I'm 27 years old, so that's about 1/3 of my life.
    I live a fast-paced, always on the go lifestyle and I like all of my information to be at the tips of my fingers... especially if I'm paying for it. So I just can't bring myself to buy a book that I will read and reference maybe 2 or 3 times a year, let alone one that has such a steep cost. I hope you reconsider your position, I've browsed some of your books before and they seem quite useful.
    Perhaps something like, buy the book, get a free copy of the eBook with it. Even if it's just a .pdf file that I can bookmark, that would be awesome. >>



    Thats fine, I respect your choice, please respect my choice. I write books, people who want to read them buy them, if they do not, not a problem.
    Kevin
    Kevin J Flynn
  • lcoopielcoopie Posts: 8,248 ✭✭✭
    I believe quite a lot of people buy kindle books which don't allow you to give a copy to a friend
  • CasmanCasman Posts: 3,960
    Studies since the early 90's suggest that the tactile benefits of reading a book far outweigh the ease and convenience of digital copies. Something to consider here.
  • rickoricko Posts: 67,856 ✭✭✭✭✭
    While I am not averse to e-books, I do prefer the hard copy version. Must be a tad old fashioned I guess... Cheers, RickO
  • DavideoDavideo Posts: 1,077 ✭✭✭


    << <i>Studies since the early 90's suggest that the tactile benefits of reading a book far outweigh the ease and convenience of digital copies. Something to consider here. >>



    Do you have any links to see studies? I see pros and cons of each and would be surprised to see studies that the tactile benefits "far outweigh" digital. Also, the ease of convenience of digital 20 years ago is completely different then today.

    Kevin, I can completely agree with your sentiments of wanting to do things how you choose and wish you the best with the book.

    My personal opinion is that I prefer a hard copy, except when I want to search and then I really wish the book had Control/Command F. image
  • DavideoDavideo Posts: 1,077 ✭✭✭
    Ooops, double post
  • BaronVonBaughBaronVonBaugh Posts: 1,593 ✭✭✭


    << <i>

    << <i>Thats fine, I respect your choice, please respect my choice. I write books, people who want to read them buy them, if they do not, not a problem.
    Kevin >>



    I meant no offense. I just don't see the harm in offering both... I know offering a free eBook copy along with the hard copy would probably entice me to buy. Alas, I shall cease with the unsolicited advice since it's apparently not appreciated.

    Enjoy the rest of your day, and best of luck with the book. >>



    The problem with offering it with a free ebook is many people would sell either the ebook or the hardcopy. Personally, I would use both.
    It's nice to go to a show or B&M with your own reference ready to use on a tablet, kindle or iPad. I have PCGS price guide & Photograde
    on my iPhone, and Coinflation as well. Also have them on my kindle.
    Wanted on BST & I sell on Great Collections
  • CasmanCasman Posts: 3,960


    << <i>

    << <i>Studies since the early 90's suggest that the tactile benefits of reading a book far outweigh the ease and convenience of digital copies. Something to consider here. >>



    Do you have any links to see studies? I see pros and cons of each and would be surprised to see studies that the tactile benefits "far outweigh" digital. Also, the ease of convenience of digital 20 years ago is completely different then today.

    Kevin, I can completely agree with your sentiments of wanting to do things how you choose and wish you the best with the book.

    My personal opinion is that I prefer a hard copy, except when I want to search and then I really wish the book had Control/Command F. image >>



    Whelp, there were 100's of studies and I haven't read everyone of them nor have I kept up on it. IIRC there was also a thing on TV which discussed it. Try a google search
  • DavideoDavideo Posts: 1,077 ✭✭✭


    << <i>

    << <i>snip >>



    Whelp, there were 100's of studies and I haven't read everyone of them nor have I kept up on it. IIRC there was also a thing on TV which discussed it. Try a google search >>



    I see a lot of studies that indicate that physical books may provide slightly better reading comprehension. However, that has nothing to do with the tactile experience far outweighing the ease and convenience of digital.

    Actually, the studies are pretty interesting. Ones conducted a long time ago show a clearer comprehension advantage for paper and that advantage has seemed to diminish over time. A common theory is that users are becoming more familiar with digital and focusing more on the reading and less on the technology.
  • EagleEyeEagleEye Posts: 7,616 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I think eBooks are the way to go. I just published my Flying Eagle and Indian Cent Attribution Guide as a two-volume 900-page eBook. My Summer Seminar students were the first to see it. I'll have a hardcover library edition by November, but who want to carry a 900-page book to shows? Just load it on your iPad or Kindle and you have at your fingertips all the time.

    They are all personalized to the owner and are mostly full color.

    Way of the future, they are, and much cheaper than the print volumes.
    Rick Snow, Eagle Eye Rare Coins, Inc.Check out my new web site:
  • TheRegulatorTheRegulator Posts: 1,162 ✭✭✭
    Great news! I was actually wondering about the book last night and looked up your old thread on Half Dimes where you mentioned the Mercury Dime book would be done in July. I will definitely purchase a copy and look forward to sitting down and turning some pages.


    ...nothing like sitting down relaxing with a paper copy of a book and reading...

    image
    "When the people find they can vote themselves money, that will herald the end of the republic." -Benjamin Franklin
  • BochimanBochiman Posts: 24,686 ✭✭✭✭✭


    << <i>I think eBooks are the way to go. I just published my Flying Eagle and Indian Cent Attribution Guide as a two-volume 900-page eBook. My Summer Seminar students were the first to see it. I'll have a hardcover library edition by November, but who want to carry a 900-page book to shows? Just load it on your iPad or Kindle and you have at your fingertips all the time.

    They are all personalized to the owner and are mostly full color.

    Way of the future, they are, and much cheaper than the print volumes. >>




    Good for you, Rick!

    I am old enough to be old school, and "prefer" books to be paperback and holdable.
    That said, I won't buy a lot of the numismatic books as that is a serious dent in the coin budget and many of them aren't used, that often, by me.... and, as you state, aren't really something that can be taken to shows.

    Now, an eBook that I could put on my tablet....I would pay a nominal fee for that, even if I didn't use it that often.

    If a researcher/numismatist REALLY wants his information to be out there, and others to benefit, then they will WANT to open it up to others to be able to get, WANT to get, and to use.
    It is the OP's, and any writer's prerogative in HOW they want to do something. Just up to them if they care enough to recognize markets and needs and want to fill it in. If not, then it seems more of an ego thing (totally may not be, but has that appearance)...."I wrote/published this book..." regardless that actual purchases were much less than they could have been.

    Would you rather have 50 copies sold of a book you can hold, or 10000 copies where the majority are eBooks? That's the kind of question I think is out there in today's world.

    I've been told I tolerate fools poorly...that may explain things if I have a problem with you. Current ebay items - Nothing at the moment

  • kevinjkevinj Posts: 925 ✭✭✭


    << <i>Great news! I was actually wondering about the book last night and looked up your old thread on Half Dimes where you mentioned the Mercury Dime book would be done in July. I will definitely purchase a copy and look forward to sitting down and turning some pages.
    ...nothing like sitting down relaxing with a paper copy of a book and reading...
    image >>



    Thanks, also the Half Dime book should be done in September
    Kevin J Flynn
  • kevinjkevinj Posts: 925 ✭✭✭


    << <i>If a researcher/numismatist REALLY wants his information to be out there, and others to benefit, then they will WANT to open it up to others to be able to get, WANT to get, and to use.
    It is the OP's, and any writer's prerogative in HOW they want to do something. Just up to them if they care enough to recognize markets and needs and want to fill it in. If not, then it seems more of an ego thing (totally may not be, but has that appearance)...."I wrote/published this book..." regardless that actual purchases were much less than they could have been.
    Would you rather have 50 copies sold of a book you can hold, or 10000 copies where the majority are eBooks? That's the kind of question I think is out there in today's world. >>



    Wow, found out, I must have just spent the last 25 years, spending tens of thousands of hours at the archives, studying, photographing, scanning coins, researching the history just to stroke my ego.
    Yeah ok. In a heart beat I would rather spend time with my family, fishing, or doing something to make money to help my family better.
    But I believe I am doing what I can to make a difference and contribute to the hobby the best way I can. I spend an average of 6-7 hours a night writing and researching. If I did not care about our hobby, I would not be doing this.
    Please show me an author of coin books who just writes for their ego, seeking glorification. Roger Burdette, David Bowers, Ken Bressett? Please explain your basis for this statement and show examples.
    In addition, my primary publisher, Kyle Vick, is not set up for ebooks, and also enjoys physical books. I do speak to the book dealers at shows and elsewhere, and get feedback from them on what collectors are looking for in books. There is always a demand for the paper edition. None have asked me for ebooks or stated that they were getting requests for ebooks. I also get people who order books directly from me, no one who wrote me asked me for an ebook, and anyone who purchased a book and wrote me said they enjoyed the books.
    If you believe this is just for the ego, please spend the hundreds of hours it takes to write a book and tell me what motivated you to complete the book.

    Kevin
    Kevin J Flynn
  • FredWeinbergFredWeinberg Posts: 4,449 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Kevin,

    Thanks for spending the time to research and publish
    new information on the many different series of coins
    that you write about.

    The numismatic hobby is far richer because of the
    material that you spend time to correlate and publish.
    Collector & Dealer in Major Mint Error Coins & Currency since the 1960's.Co-Author of Whitman's "100 Greatest U.S. Mint Error Coins", and the Error Coin Encyclopedia, Vols., III & IV.
    Authenticator for Major Mint Errors
    for PCGS. A 42 +-Year PNG Member, and an ICTA Board Member.A full time coin dealer since 1972.
  • DeepCoinDeepCoin Posts: 2,782 ✭✭✭
    I truly appreciate the time and effort that goes into writing a book. My wife is an academic who reads at least 200 books a year for pleasure. We have an extensive hard cover library, but that said, we have quit buying paper books due to the storage issues involved. Given that we are retiring 800 miles from our current home, most of the books will be given away. We either use the library to get hard cover or buy ebooks using either a kindle or Amazon. The ability to access books without the burden of carrying them is truly liberating!

    I can see tremendous value for ebooks so you can access the information at a show. It is not unlike PCGS providing online data, a terrific way to have the information you need at your fingertips when looking at coins to buy.

    I would think this would be the mail method of distribution for coin related material in the future due to the portability of the information. There are many ways to ensure the author is properly compensated. Just MHO.
    Retired United States Mint guy, now working on an Everyman Type Set.
  • pcunixpcunix Posts: 620


    << <i>

    << <i>

    << <i>Thats fine, I respect your choice, please respect my choice. I write books, people who want to read them buy them, if they do not, not a problem.
    Kevin >>



    I meant no offense. I just don't see the harm in offering both... I know offering a free eBook copy along with the hard copy would probably entice me to buy. Alas, I shall cease with the unsolicited advice since it's apparently not appreciated.

    Enjoy the rest of your day, and best of luck with the book. >>



    The problem with offering it with a free ebook is many people would sell either the ebook or the hardcopy. Personally, I would use both.
    It's nice to go to a show or B&M with your own reference ready to use on a tablet, kindle or iPad. I have PCGS price guide & Photograde
    on my iPhone, and Coinflation as well. Also have them on my kindle. >>



    Who said "free"? You SELL ebooks, unless you want to give them away.
  • pcunixpcunix Posts: 620


    << <i>I think eBooks are the way to go. I just published my Flying Eagle and Indian Cent Attribution Guide as a two-volume 900-page eBook. My Summer Seminar students were the first to see it. I'll have a hardcover library edition by November, but who want to carry a 900-page book to shows? Just load it on your iPad or Kindle and you have at your fingertips all the time.

    They are all personalized to the owner and are mostly full color.

    Way of the future, they are, and much cheaper than the print volumes. >>



    Exactly.

    As I've said before, I won't buy hard copy any more unless I absolutely must have it. I'm 66 years old, by the way, and initially had a "grumpy old man" attitude toward ebooks. The convenience of the iPad and Kindle was what changed my mind. Now I have many of my most important reference books at hand wherever I am - I'd need a couple of suitcases worth of dead tree books to match it.

    As to Kevin's "nothing like sitting down relaxing with a paper copy of a book and reading", sitting down with my iPad beats it hands down. I can zoom text and pictures, I can mark areas I want to come back too, I can even annotate with the better readers. I can search, I can look up words..

    Shrug. As I said, I hope the next generation has a better understanding of digital work. I suppose that when they invented writing the story tellers were grumpy and said 'there's nothing like sitting by the fire listening to a good tale told by an expert story teller!" - and that's true, but new technology does have its advantages!
  • pcunixpcunix Posts: 620


    << <i>Studies since the early 90's suggest that the tactile benefits of reading a book far outweigh the ease and convenience of digital copies. Something to consider here. >>




    Studies done with people used to reading hard copy, of course.. not biased in ANY way whatsoever.

  • pcunixpcunix Posts: 620


    << <i>
    In addition, my primary publisher, Kyle Vick, is not set up for ebooks, and also enjoys physical books. >>



    You don't even NEED a publisher for ebooks.



    << <i> I do speak to the book dealers at shows and elsewhere, and get feedback from them on what collectors are looking for in books. There is always a demand for the paper edition. None have asked me for ebooks or stated that they were getting requests for ebooks. I also get people who order books directly from me, no one who wrote me asked me for an ebook

    >>



    And yet every time this has come up here and elsewhere, people agree that they'd like coin ebooks so they could carry their references to shows.. funny thing, that.

    I'm not going to convince you - it's your "tradition" (I'd use a different word, but that's what you choose to call it). I only hope to convince some younger minded person about to write a numismatic work.
  • kevinjkevinj Posts: 925 ✭✭✭


    << <i>And yet every time this has come up here and elsewhere, people agree that they'd like coin ebooks so they could carry their references to shows.. funny thing, that.
    I'm not going to convince you - it's your "tradition" (I'd use a different word, but that's what you choose to call it). I only hope to convince some younger minded person about to write a numismatic work. >>



    I will never do an numismatic ebook, plain and simple,
    if you want to make a statement about ebooks, please start your own thread and do not disrupt my thread with non-relevant subjects. This was about Mercury dimes.
    If you want to write an ebook, please feel free to do it yourself.
    Kevin J Flynn
  • pcunixpcunix Posts: 620


    << <i>

    << <i>And yet every time this has come up here and elsewhere, people agree that they'd like coin ebooks so they could carry their references to shows.. funny thing, that.
    I'm not going to convince you - it's your "tradition" (I'd use a different word, but that's what you choose to call it). I only hope to convince some younger minded person about to write a numismatic work. >>



    I will never do an numismatic ebook, plain and simple,
    if you want to make a statement about ebooks, please start your own thread and do not disrupt my thread with non-relevant subjects. This was about Mercury dimes.
    If you want to write an ebook, please feel free to do it yourself. >>



    I wasn't the one who brought it up, Kevin. I just added my two very relevant cents.

    AFAIK, there's in no reason that anyone can't make RELEVANT comments in a thread whether you like it or not.
  • kevinjkevinj Posts: 925 ✭✭✭


    << <i>I wasn't the one who brought it up, Kevin. I just added my two very relevant cents.
    AFAIK, there's in no reason that anyone can't make RELEVANT comments in a thread whether you like it or not. >>



    You said you wanted to educate people about ebooks, fine, great, start a thread and teach people about it.

    I have written 46 books now, none have ever been on ebooks, none will ever be, but yet you and others want to hijack the thread to speak about ebooks.

    I agree others have spoke about it, you are not the first, I addressed them, was letting it die, you wanted to bring it back up.

    Why do you need to address ebooks in my thread?? Simple question.
    Kevin J Flynn
  • ArizonaJackArizonaJack Posts: 4,042 ✭✭✭
    Totally out of line.

    Congrats Mr Flynn and thank you for your books, I have a few of them .....on my bookshelf
    " YOU SUCK " Awarded 5/18/08
  • sparky64sparky64 Posts: 6,350 ✭✭✭✭✭


    << <i>Totally out of line. >>


    image
    Congratulations and best of luck. image

    "If I say something in the woods and my wife isn't there to hear it.....am I still wrong?"

    My meager Washington Quarter Registry set

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