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Major vs Minor Die Varieties

19Lyds19Lyds Posts: 26,472 ✭✭✭✭
Exactly what is the difference between a "Major" and a "Minor" die variety??

Specifically with regard to doubled dies.

Is it degree of spread or degree of popularity?
I decided to change calling the bathroom the John and renamed it the Jim. I feel so much better saying I went to the Jim this morning.



The name is LEE!

Comments

  • BustHalfBrianBustHalfBrian Posts: 4,124 ✭✭✭
    The severity of the doubling?
    Lurking and learning since 2010. Full-time professional numismatist.
  • coin22lovercoin22lover Posts: 3,452 ✭✭✭
    Maybe it depends on what series you're talking about, but I think of the major varieties as ones that are found in the red book and such...and even though being more common than some other important varieties, may be worth much more.
  • The measures I use

    Significant = naked eye & interesting. (Note subtle can count if it is extra interesting such as a reused proof die or some how unique)

    Major :
    The kind of coin a generalist will want like a 55 DDO and 42/1p dime. They are so cool they are collected outside their series.

    Avg :
    The avg series specialist would want one like the 1943p Double eye nickel ( cool but nobody cares outside
    Of the series)

    Minor :
    Only the hardest core of specialists care


    As to what is consider cool it is an abstract formula of rarity, wow factor, series popularity.


  • RadioContestKingRadioContestKing Posts: 3,002 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I have noticed this in the Washington Quarter Series, and there is a Minor Variety Quarter on Ebay right now for over 450 bucks, just for fun I did the certificate lookup and the coin being a minor has a price guide of 50 bucks. I also wonder if our host would put LDS on a 1953 omm-001. They list it in the CPG and say its often overlooked and not as saleable? Does pcgs put LDS on a label? I was going to start a thread about this as it seems lately Ebay is full of coins that claim to be whatever but there not. Knowledge is power..........I also see all the minor varieties listed on the Variety Vista website and was told that pcgs only counts the major ones.......yet lately there are these new minor dies showing up more and more.........Do they count in the Registry sets? Or is this another way to Tap into lost grading fees? Enjoy image
    https://youtube.com/watch?v=UayFm2yCHV8
    I used to be famous now I just collect coins.


    Link to My Registry Set.

    https://pcgs.com/setregistry/quarters/washington-quarters-specialty-sets/washington-quarters-complete-variety-set-circulation-strikes-1932-1964/publishedset/78469

    Varieties Are The Spice Of LIFE and Thanks to Those who teach us what to search For.
  • CoinflipCoinflip Posts: 842 ✭✭✭


    << <i>Exactly what is the difference between a "Major" and a "Minor" die variety??

    Specifically with regard to doubled dies.

    Is it degree of spread or degree of popularity? >>



    Spread and class of the doubling, CONECA usually will list this as medium spread etc,many are list-able but too minor.Its just usually the bigger the spread , the bigger the demand. However some are still very collectible I.E ,

    1954 proof 50c fs101
    ..so minor of a spread but so rare and rarely found, highly sought after but very minor of a DD, almost takes an RPM loupe to really check for this one

    I.E... 72 Die004 1c, minor spread, but worth well more than the big DDO that year, because of its rarity

    19Lyds , aren't you a big IKE collector including varieties?
    SMILEFORSOMECHANGE LLC
    RAD#306

  • kookoox10kookoox10 Posts: 538 ✭✭✭


    << <i>The measures I use

    Significant = naked eye & interesting. (Note subtle can count if it is extra interesting such as a reused proof die or some how unique)

    Major :
    The kind of coin a generalist will want like a 55 DDO and 42/1p dime. They are so cool they are collected outside their series.

    Avg :
    The avg series specialist would want one like the 1943p Double eye nickel ( cool but nobody cares outside
    Of the series)

    Minor :
    Only the hardest core of specialists care


    As to what is consider cool it is an abstract formula of rarity, wow factor, series popularity. >>



    This would be the general description and fits to a T. Since I cherrypick varieties out of wheat bags regularly, another x-factor in determining major/minor is the amount of varieties for the date. For example (per coppercoins.com), a 1944 Lincoln cent has over 90 posted varieties (RPMs, DDs, OMMs). The two main OMMs and maybe RPM #1&2 might be considered the major types, while 3-? are the minor varieties. Again, the hardcore specialists weigh each differently depending on how dramatic those varieties look.
  • I think it is Degree of popularity.

    Regards, Larryimage
  • shylockshylock Posts: 4,288 ✭✭✭
    With double dies its the degree of separation compared to other DDs of the same series.
    A major DD on a more modern coin is going to be more dramatic than early coins.
  • 291fifth291fifth Posts: 23,932 ✭✭✭✭✭
    A major die variety has an active two-way market.

    A minor die variety has only a one-way market. (I want to sell this to you for a big premium but I never pay a premium for it. I only "make my own."
    All glory is fleeting.


  • << <i>A major die variety has an active two-way market.

    A minor die variety has only a one-way market. (I want to sell this to you for a big premium but I never pay a premium for it. I only "make my own." >>



    Interesting perspective and so true
  • howardshowards Posts: 1,239 ✭✭✭
    In my SNV reference on shield nickels, doubled dies are classified as major if there is full separation between the overlapping annulets. This is a series-specific definition, so it may not help you much, but the basic answer I chose is "degree of doubling."

    Minor doubling:

    image

    Major doubling (east/west - unusual direction):

    image

    Major doubling (north/south - typical direction):

    image

    Really major doubling:

    image
  • Cool nickels
  • BaleyBaley Posts: 22,658 ✭✭✭✭✭


    << <i>

    << <i>A major die variety has an active two-way market.

    A minor die variety has only a one-way market. (I want to sell this to you for a big premium but I never pay a premium for it. I only "make my own." >>



    Interesting perspective and so true >>



    that is a great definition, image and IMO it also applies to many high grade moderns.

    Liberty: Parent of Science & Industry

  • I always thought it was naked eye vs loop to spot it
  • fcloudfcloud Posts: 12,133 ✭✭✭✭
    It all depends on which coins the authors have. They publish, so they are major. You have one that isn't in those popular books, and it minor.

    President, Racine Numismatic Society 2013-2014; Variety Resource Dimes; See 6/8/12 CDN for my article on Winged Liberty Dimes; Ebay

  • howardshowards Posts: 1,239 ✭✭✭


    << <i>It all depends on which coins the authors have. They publish, so they are major. You have one that isn't in those popular books, and it minor. >>



    Personal ownership has never been a criterion for listing in my reference. To the contrary, I depend on the generosity of fellow collectors to enhance my reference by allowing me to photograph/publish the coins they own.
  • coinkatcoinkat Posts: 22,762 ✭✭✭✭✭
    The question can be answered by popularity and what can be promoted- not a very noble answer but it is sort of the way it is

    Experience the World through Numismatics...it's more than you can imagine.

  • georgiacop50georgiacop50 Posts: 2,909 ✭✭✭✭


    << <i>It all depends on which coins the authors have. They publish, so they are major. You have one that isn't in those popular books, and it minor. >>



    this
  • 19Lyds19Lyds Posts: 26,472 ✭✭✭✭


    << <i>

    << <i>Exactly what is the difference between a "Major" and a "Minor" die variety??

    Specifically with regard to doubled dies.

    Is it degree of spread or degree of popularity? >>



    Spread and class of the doubling, CONECA usually will list this as medium spread etc,many are list-able but too minor.Its just usually the bigger the spread , the bigger the demand. However some are still very collectible I.E ,

    1954 proof 50c fs101
    ..so minor of a spread but so rare and rarely found, highly sought after but very minor of a DD, almost takes an RPM loupe to really check for this one

    I.E... 72 Die004 1c, minor spread, but worth well more than the big DDO that year, because of its rarity

    19Lyds , aren't you a big IKE collector including varieties? >>



    So, would the following be Major or Minor??

    "Strong spread on UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, E PLURIBUS UNUM, stars around the rim, designer's initials, and AR of DOLLAR"
    I decided to change calling the bathroom the John and renamed it the Jim. I feel so much better saying I went to the Jim this morning.



    The name is LEE!
  • Our Host will tell you, If it has an FS number it is Major if not it is Minor.
    Kinda sucks when they send them back with Minor Variety on the insert.

    Regards, Larryimage
  • New to this thread and looking for some direction. Generally speaking where is the best place to find info on the Varieties that are listed on PCGS? I have a bunch of silver washington quarters and it seems like every one has a variety listed but very few of the PCGS images actually show exactly what to look for to ID the variety. My main group is morgans so I am looking at vamworld for those but what about other types not shown in detail on PCGS? thoughts?

    Sup. Morgans are cool - So are Ducatis.

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