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Affordable PATTERN coins

A question for those who collect or deal in pattern coins: are there patterns that are still affordable and underpriced? If so can you be specific? Any photos?Thank you for the help.

Comments

  • mrearlygoldmrearlygold Posts: 17,858 ✭✭✭
    Define affordable
  • CladiatorCladiator Posts: 17,919 ✭✭✭✭✭
    image


  • BlackBeardBlackBeard Posts: 1,064
    image
    Witty sig line currently under construction. Thank you for your patience.
  • ZoinsZoins Posts: 33,811 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Patterns are probably a very thinly traded market. I haven't found a single US pattern on eBay sell in an auction format, every one seems to have a BIN. This doesn't answer your question on whether they are affordable but many probably sell for retail prices, aside from when they appear at the large auction houses.
  • CladiatorCladiator Posts: 17,919 ✭✭✭✭✭
    So a quick search at Heritage of their auction archives. It'll give you a good bearing on what they are bringing.
  • MarkMark Posts: 3,522 ✭✭✭✭✭
    My, this thread descended to the depths rather quickly.

    To go back on topic, I think it's almost impossible to know what is "underpriced." And "affordable" varies from one collector to another. What is unaffordable to me is easily affordable to many of the other board members. That said, about the least expensive pattern is J-228, an Indian Head Cent pattern. To quote Heritage's description of this coin, it's "A transitional pattern with the obverse of 1859 paired with the reverse of 1860. Struck in copper-nickel with a plain edge." A J-228 in PCGS MS63 just sold for $977.50 in the last Heritage auction. For an MS (or PR) patern, that is probably among the cheapest patterns that has sold recently.
    Mark


  • ziggy29ziggy29 Posts: 18,668 ✭✭✭
    Terms like "underpriced," "undervalued" and "underrated" are thrown around too cavalierly in many occasions. The problem is, "value" depends on supply AND demand, not just supply. So if something is scarce but is cheap, it's not necessarily "undervalued" if there's no demand for it. Low priced relative to supply, yes, but not "undervalued" because value needs to consider the demand aspect.

    Given that the market values are based on supply AND demand, and that values are set at the equilibrium point, I'd contend nothing much is "undervalued." Some stuff is just valued lower relative to their supply.
  • RYKRYK Posts: 35,786 ✭✭✭✭✭
    IMO, the cooler and rarer patterns are very expensive, and the uninteresting and common ones are less expensive, but still expensive.

    (I hope that I do not get sued for posting this here.)
  • mgoodm3mgoodm3 Posts: 17,497 ✭✭✭
    I personally think hijacking a thread with a personal attack is uncool. (it went poof)

    I love patterns. There are some neat ones out there that aren't that expensive. You just will have to be happy with a smaller demonination.
    coinimaging.com/my photography articles Check out the new macro lens testing section
  • CoinlearnerCoinlearner Posts: 2,464 ✭✭✭✭
    image Alot of the nicer ones are priced out of what I can/will pay for them.image I do have a lot of Gallery Mint copies of coins {patterns} that are close to the real coins........That may be one way to aquire an affordable example of the patterns. image
  • sbeverlysbeverly Posts: 962 ✭✭✭
    A question for those who collect or deal in pattern coins: are there patterns that are still affordable and underpriced?

    I also, am interested in this question. I think that someone thats experienced with these coins could throw out a Dollar
    amount as a base line for discussion.

    regards
    Positive transactions with Cladiator, Meltdown, ajbauman, LeeG, route66,DennisH,Hmann,FilamCoins,mgoodm3,terburn88,MrOrganic, weg,dcarr,guitarwes,Zubie,Barndog,wondercoin,braddick,etc...
  • Most interesting and least expensive I saw on the website above is a J570 nickel which went for $633 (NGC AU58) earlier this year--I say interesting because it looks nothing like the 1867 Shield nickel. The J570 has a 3CN obverse and a 5 cents within a wreath reverse. This as opposed to some of the relatively inexpensive 1859 and 1858 cent patterns which are hard to tell from a normal IHC.

    Edit: I don't collect patterns just tried to find the least expensive, most interesting pattern I could for the OP.
    Curmudgeon in waiting!
  • JcarneyJcarney Posts: 3,154
    OK, so now just certain posts are going poof?
    “When the people find that they can vote themselves money, that will herald the end of the republic.” — Benjamin Franklin


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  • CladiatorCladiator Posts: 17,919 ✭✭✭✭✭


    << <i>OK, so now just certain posts are going poof? >>

    I noticed that too.
  • fcfc Posts: 12,789 ✭✭✭
    hm. oh well.
  • ZoinsZoins Posts: 33,811 ✭✭✭✭✭


    << <i>OK, so now just certain posts are going poof? >>

    It's probably better than poofing the entire thread.
  • ZoinsZoins Posts: 33,811 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Don't forget the lure of the darkside image
  • ziggy29ziggy29 Posts: 18,668 ✭✭✭


    << <i>OK, so now just certain posts are going poof? >>

    As it should be. It sucks when a few flames cause an otherwise interesting and informative thread to go poof.
  • rec78rec78 Posts: 5,681 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I don't know about underpriced but i have always liked the 1858 Indian head cent pattern. It is affordable especially in circ grades.
    image
  • ZoinsZoins Posts: 33,811 ✭✭✭✭✭
    There is enough attention on US patterns now that my feeling is that they may all be fully priced, not under priced.
  • RKKayRKKay Posts: 3,015 ✭✭✭
    You won't find any pattern for less than $500. Usually, that will be a circulated common piece. Unc common pieces (standard silver, 3cn design or some IHC patterns) can be had for under $1,500. Most others will run at least $2,000 for the more common pieces and $5,000 for others. These are general numbers and exceptions can be found. The market is very much dependent upon who sees and/or is interested in a particular piece. I've seen my share of "bargains," but have also seen my share of exhorbitant prices.
  • coinpicturescoinpictures Posts: 5,345 ✭✭✭


    << <i>Don't forget the lure of the darkside image >>



    Bingo!

    French Essais and patterns are relatively cheap, with some neat designs.

    The Bavarian and Prussian Goetz patterns from 1913 are stunning, as well as affordable ($125-400 in proof).

    I personally have a thing for Liberian proof patterns. I only have a couple, but they're nice:

    image


    (Reverse on this next one look like a familiar design? image )

    image
  • MrEurekaMrEureka Posts: 23,930 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I don't think it's possible to determine which patterns are undervalued by the market until you understand the numismatic importance of each coin. It's not just a matter of grades and pops and pretty designs. You need to know why the coin was produced. More than anything else, it's the history of the coin that will ultimately have the biggest impact on its value.

    For example, an R7 1863 Postage Currency dime in an experimental alloy is a great piece of numismatic history, especially at only a few grand. An R8 1866 pattern nickel struck in Mickley's garage from discarded dies is little more than a glorified counterfeit, yet it could bring 25K because it's rarer and there are relatively more pattern nickel collectors.

    Andy Lustig

    Doggedly collecting coins of the Central American Republic.

    Visit the Society of US Pattern Collectors at USPatterns.com.
  • dcarrdcarr Posts: 7,973 ✭✭✭✭✭
    There are modern privately-minted "concept" pattern dollars, some with mintages of less than 20. They typically sell for $20-$200. The key factor with these types of pieces is whether or not they have any historical significance or ties to the US Mint and/or US Government. For example, here are a couple $20-$30 value concept dollars that have connections to the US Mint: image

    image
    image
    image
  • ZoinsZoins Posts: 33,811 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited January 23, 2023 12:40AM

    @dcarr said:
    There are modern privately-minted "concept" pattern dollars, some with mintages of less than 20. They typically sell for $20-$200. The key factor with these types of pieces is whether or not they have any historical significance or ties to the US Mint and/or US Government. For example, here are a couple $20-$30 value concept dollars that have connections to the US Mint:

    Running across a number of pattern threads tonight.

    I'm a big fan of these modern coins with ties to the Mint, from Dan and others. They are inexpensive and historic. A great way to get involved with US Mint design consideration.

    Here's one I picked up :)

    Some great info from @dcarr in the thread here:

    https://forums.collectors.com/discussion/comment/13298108/#Comment_13298108

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