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1901 S Barber Quarter Question

What are some dead give aways to look for that tell the coin is a fake? Just curious. Any and all comments welcome.

Ryan

Comments

  • Manifest_DestinyManifest_Destiny Posts: 3,046 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Eldorado9 said:
    It's not certified. Almost ALL real one's are.

    I agree with this. The specific thing you should check is the date and mintmark positions.

  • BarberianBarberian Posts: 2,898 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Either get ahold of a good, recent Barber quarter reference and learn how to recognize the real thing, being well aware there are counterfeits out there, or buy one that has been certified. If you are in a hurry, buy a certified coin. And remember, there is no Santa Claus in coin collecting, particularly with key coins like the 1901-S quarter.

    3 rim nicks away from Good
  • goldengolden Posts: 8,962 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Don't buy one raw if you don't know what you are doing.

  • ChrisH821ChrisH821 Posts: 6,282 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I've heard story of one lucky SOB finding one in bulk 90%.
    Your best(safest) bet is probably to assume it is fake, but posting good pictures here will help us help you.

    Collector, occasional seller

  • jdimmickjdimmick Posts: 9,577 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The above 01-s Quarter I used to own a few years ago. Reeded edge bought it from Ming (Kollector King) who used to be active on this board years past. I think KK bought it from Teaparty? (but not 100% sure) Anyway, I was alerted to the coin by a friend, so I called Robert at reedededge and worked out a deal if they could get it crossed Id buy it, Robbie the ace at grading he is told me ill get it crossed and upgraded which he did, so I owned it for several years. I actually liked the coin, I had Dave Kahn sticker it for me which it did. Some of those Barber Folks on this board did not like the coin becuase they said it wasnt original enough, but I had several who did including the guy who went to work for Heritage and then started his own coin business from Oklahoma, (cant think of his name off hand, but a well respected Coin guy and excellent grader. ) Anyway, when i was diagnosed with stage 3 a couple years back, I sold off a majority of my good stuff thru Ian at GC. I did not want my family having to get "lets say screwed over" by some shiester dealer. Unfortunately, I am still kicking so I do miss the coin, but it was nice to see it pop up again in the discussion.

  • jesbrokenjesbroken Posts: 9,038 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @jdimmick said:

    I'm sure your family would say, "Fortunately". Very few only one coins in most collectors budgets. We would miss you, so glad you are still here.
    Jim


    When a man who is honestly mistaken hears the truth, he will either quit being mistaken or cease to be honest....Abraham Lincoln

    Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it.....Mark Twain
  • Manifest_DestinyManifest_Destiny Posts: 3,046 ✭✭✭✭✭

    100% fake.

  • CaptHenwayCaptHenway Posts: 31,441 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Not all raw coins are counterfeit or altered. However, if you do not have years of experience as an Authenticator or Dealer as people like me have, protect yourself by buying a certified coin you like.

    Numismatist. 50 year member ANA. Winner of four ANA Heath Literary Awards; three Wayte and Olga Raymond Literary Awards; Numismatist of the Year Award 2009, and Lifetime Achievement Award 2020. Winner numerous NLG Literary Awards.
  • MFeldMFeld Posts: 11,736 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @CaptHenway said:
    Not all raw coins are counterfeit or altered. However, if you do not have years of experience as an Authenticator or Dealer as people like me have, protect yourself by buying a certified coin you like.

    Agreed, and that will offer considerable protection. But if you're not able to distinguish genuine coins from copies, you can also end up buying counterfeit coins in counterfeit grading company holders. So it's best to buy from well known sellers with good reputations.

    Mark Feld* of Heritage Auctions*Unless otherwise noted, my posts here represent my personal opinions.

  • GreenstangGreenstang Posts: 723 ✭✭✭✭

    Photo is out too of focus to see any detail but from what I can see,
    I would say it is a counterfeit.
    CLEAR pictures of both sides would determine this either way.

  • lcoopielcoopie Posts: 8,668 ✭✭✭✭✭

    A good way is to find a dealer who used to be a grader for a major company and who has a reputation for knowledge and fairness to his or her customer, and who likes to teach newcomers.

    LCoopie = Les
  • BillJonesBillJones Posts: 33,383 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Greenstang said:
    Photo is out too of focus to see any detail but from what I can see,
    I would say it is a counterfeit.
    CLEAR pictures of both sides would determine this either way.

    I agree. Bad photos are the stock and trade of Internet sellers who try to stick your with counterfeits.

    As for the 1901-S Quarter, given the prices, I can't see why all of them aren't certified.

    Many years ago, when I was a dealer at the Winter FUN show, the guy across from me had two 1901-S quarters. They were gross and ugly. One graded Fair and the other AG, and both were raw. He wanted more than $5,000 for each of them.

    As I've posted many times. If I can't afford a half-way decent example of a coin, I will not own it.

    Retired dealer and avid collector of U.S. type coins, 19th century presidential campaign medalets and selected medals. In recent years I have been working on a set of British coins - at least one coin from each king or queen who issued pieces that are collectible. I am also collecting at least one coin for each Roman emperor from Julius Caesar to ... ?

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