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Which of these (if any) should be in a 20th Century Type Set?

lsicalsica Posts: 1,552 ✭✭✭

Hello Group

I'm thinking of starting a 20th Century Type Set, but I'm wondering which coins I should include. I've made a list consisting of pieces that are sometimes included and sometimes not, and I'd like to see what the group thinks as to their inclusion. I don't seem to be able to create a poll allowing multiple votes, so responders are going to have to cut and paste. Sorry for the inconvenience and thank you to all who respond

Cents
Lincoln No Initials Wheat 1909-1917
Lincoln Shell Case 1944-1945
Lincoln Memorial Brass 1962-1982
Lincoln Memorial Zinc 1982-1999

Nickels
Jefferson Initials 1966-1999

Dimes
Late Date Roosevelt Silver Proof 1992-1999

Quarters
Standing Liberty Covered Recessed Date 1925-1930
Silver Clad Bicentennial 1974-1976 (1776-1976)
Late Date Washington Silver Proof 1992-1998
All 5 State 25c 1999
All 5 State 25c Silver Proof 1999

Halfs
Silver Clad Bicentennial 1974-1976 (1776-1976)
Late Date Kennedy Silver Proof 1992-1994
Kennedy Clad Reduced Bust 1995-1999
Kennedy Reduced Bust Silver Proof 1995-1999

Dollars
Peace High Relief 1921
Silver Clad Eisenhower 1971-1974
Silver Clad Bicentennial 1974-1976 (1776-1976)
Clad Bicentennial Type 2 1974-1976 (1776-1976)
Silver Clad Bicentennial Type 2 1974-1976 (1776-1976)

And yeah I know the last one is unique but including it for completeness sake ;)

Philately will get you nowhere....

Comments

  • coinbufcoinbuf Posts: 10,612 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited January 11, 2024 9:28AM

    Your list is missing several 20th century coins, any pre 64 Washinton qtr for example, and many redundancies with all the Ike dollars. Overall you seem to be very focused on post 64 issues, but it's your collection and if this definition of 20th century coinage suits you then that is all you need.

    My Lincoln Registry
    My Collection of Old Holders

    Never a slave to one plastic brand will I ever be.
  • PerryHallPerryHall Posts: 45,183 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited January 11, 2024 9:24AM

    Buffalo nickel Type 1 and 2.

    Worry is the interest you pay on a debt you may not owe.

  • Manifest_DestinyManifest_Destiny Posts: 2,957 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Just buy an album and use that as your guide.

  • oldabeintxoldabeintx Posts: 1,563 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Check the Registry for a list of 20th century Type coins "required". That's a pretty good starting point.

  • hfjacintohfjacinto Posts: 734 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Here you go.



    If you really want to get complete you can add the modern day quarters.


    The 3 types of Standing Liberty.



    And a commemorative.

    And an ASE


  • OAKSTAROAKSTAR Posts: 5,406 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I kinda made my own for the back of my 7070. Not the best pictures but you get the point.

    Disclaimer: I'm not a dealer, trader, grader, investor or professional numismatist. I'm just a hobbyist. (To protect me but mostly you! 🤣 )

  • seatedlib3991seatedlib3991 Posts: 398 ✭✭✭✭

    I think you mean to collect later 20th century coins. Indian cents, buffalo nickels, barbers, walkers, franklins etc. are all awol. james

  • lsicalsica Posts: 1,552 ✭✭✭
    edited January 12, 2024 8:33AM

    To everyone who posted my list was "missing" items - my list were items that were sometimes/often ****EXCLUDED**** so I wanted to see what people thought of my ****INCLUDING**** them @seatedlib3991 @coinbuf

    @291fifth seems to be the only one who understood what I was asking. Sorry if I wasn't clear

    Philately will get you nowhere....
  • WCCWCC Posts: 2,331 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I wouldn't include any from your list.

    SQ is at least a different design, but too many with the same obverse.

    The others don't look different enough.

  • david3142david3142 Posts: 3,367 ✭✭✭✭✭

    For my 20th century set I count a Zinc Lincoln, the 3 SLQ types, a state quarter from 1999, a 1921 Peace, all of the MS bicentennials, and I also include a Silver Eagle. I don’t collect proofs so I don’t include any of those.

  • oldabeintxoldabeintx Posts: 1,563 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @lsica said:
    To everyone who posted my list was "missing" items - my list were items that were sometimes/often ****EXCLUDED**** so I wanted to see what people thought of my ****INCLUDING**** them @seatedlib3991 @coinbuf

    Of course, I should have deduced that from the list. I generally take an expansive view of type. I would include anything that YOU think is interesting and different from similar types. More coins is more education, more hunting and more fun.

    If you review the PCGS 20th Century Registry types including Type Variations you will see all but a few of the types you listed. Even the Basic sets include a number of the types you listed. If you go the manufactured album route you're stuck with someone else's idea of type and if you adhere to the Registry, same thing.

    Some specifics:
    1. If you believe, as I do, that the 20th Century ended with the year 2000, you need a Sac dollar.
    2. PCGS splits Jeffs into Original Design Vintage and Original Design Modern. I believe the latter begins in 1965.
    3. I like to include First Year and Last Year types. IMO the earlies types often have a different "fabric" than the later years, at least at higher MS and proof grades. E.g. I have a 1916 as well as a 1947 Walker in my set in MS64. Same for proofs if you include proofs, as I have. Big difference between a 1909 Lincoln proof and a 1958 Lincoln proof.
    4. I often include types that do "double duty". Family birth years, proof sets, anniversaries, important events. E.g. I used 1912 for my gold as that was my dad's birth year (and the year Titanic sank).

    Lastly, yes you might end up with a lot of "redundant" coins if you adhere to someone else's idea of type. Lots of clad and silver versions of the same coin. Lots of modern quarters with different reverses. (21st Century is worse.) Again, what you find interesting and attractive is all that matters.

    Have fun.

  • WCCWCC Posts: 2,331 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @oldabeintx said:

    Lastly, yes you might end up with a lot of "redundant" coins if you adhere to someone else's idea of type. Lots of clad and silver versions of the same coin. Lots of modern quarters with different reverses. (21st Century is worse.) Again, what you find interesting and attractive is all that matters.

    It all comes down to personal preference. Concurrently, I find collecting by type in the manner implied by the OP to be contradictory.

    I don't collect by type but if I did, I'd want more distinctive variety. I don't and won't have enough budget to buy a larger type collection of coins I actually want collecting in this manner.

  • BillJonesBillJones Posts: 33,362 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I have examples of everything on your list except for the unique mint error or fantasy piece at the bottom. The difference is, most of them are not certified, and they don’t need to be certified. The certification often costs more than the value of the coin.

    Some of the coins on your list are considered to be main stream types among advanced collectors, like the 1921 Peace Dollar and the Standing Liberty Quarter with the recessed date. In the end you are free to collect what you like.

    Retired dealer and avid collector of U.S. type coins, 19th century presidential campaign medalets and selected medals. In recent years I have been working on a set of British coins - at least one coin from each king or queen who issued pieces that are collectible. I am also collecting at least one coin for each Roman emperor from Julius Caesar to ... ?
  • oldabeintxoldabeintx Posts: 1,563 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @BillJones said:
    I have examples of everything on your list except for the unique mint error or fantasy piece at the bottom.

    I'm also unfamiliar with the "reduced head" Kennedy of 1995 onward.

  • CatbertCatbert Posts: 6,468 ✭✭✭✭✭

    If it were me, I'd exclude all post 1964 coinage. Thus, I'd have a truncated 20th century type set.

    "Got a flaming heart, can't get my fill"
  • lsicalsica Posts: 1,552 ✭✭✭

    @Catbert said:
    If it were me, I'd exclude all post 1964 coinage. Thus, I'd have a truncated 20th century type set.

    Actually 1974 works as a cutoff date too, because that's the year before the first "single year circulating commemeratives" (Bicentennials) that make the number of issues in a 20th century explode and make a "21st century type set" already have dozens of coins

    Philately will get you nowhere....
  • Farmer1961Farmer1961 Posts: 159 ✭✭✭

    I always wanted to put together a high grade set of key date 20th century type coins. Of course getting a high grade 1916-D dime, 1901-s barber quarter, 1916 seated quarter etc. Presents a problem for someone who is not a multi millionaire so it never happened.

  • Farmer1961Farmer1961 Posts: 159 ✭✭✭

    Oops 1916 standing quarter

  • BillJonesBillJones Posts: 33,362 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Catbert said:
    If it were me, I'd exclude all post 1964 coinage. Thus, I'd have a truncated 20th century type set.

    The mint issuing too much stuff that could be called type coins, but much of it will never circulate. If a design doesn't circulate, my interest in it is much reduced as a type coin. My regular annual purchases are limited to the silver Proof set. If a coin is not in that set, chances are I will never add it to my collection.

    Retired dealer and avid collector of U.S. type coins, 19th century presidential campaign medalets and selected medals. In recent years I have been working on a set of British coins - at least one coin from each king or queen who issued pieces that are collectible. I am also collecting at least one coin for each Roman emperor from Julius Caesar to ... ?
  • BillJonesBillJones Posts: 33,362 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Farmer1961 said:
    Oops 1916 standing quarter

    That coin has enough demand pressure on it already. It’s a not a type coin.

    if you want to go bananas with type coins, there are a different number of rays on the reverse of the late date Peace dollars. I bought one for that reason many years ago. I have weaned myself off of that kind of foolish nit picking.

    You can go equally bananas with early type coins and spend fortune. You could go for a 1793 Cap Cent or a Head of ‘93 dated 1794 and all types of Pole to Cap Half Cents. The 1794 dollar is slightly different from 1795 Flowing Hair dollars. When I win the lottery, I’ll go after them.

    Retired dealer and avid collector of U.S. type coins, 19th century presidential campaign medalets and selected medals. In recent years I have been working on a set of British coins - at least one coin from each king or queen who issued pieces that are collectible. I am also collecting at least one coin for each Roman emperor from Julius Caesar to ... ?
  • I've previously posted my Capital Holder 20th Century Type Set, a set of 40 coins including the gold issues. The latest dated coin in the set is the Suzy dollar. For me this is a very complete type set for 1900-1999. It represents all issues and is a very satisfying set to pull together and own. The oddest included coin in my set, in my opinion, is the 1966 FS initials added Jefferson nickel. There could be spots for the 1921 Peace and Morgan dollars as separate types from other Peace and Morgans, 1996W Roosevelt dime, and a 1999 State quarter and possibly others. Do commemoratives belong in a Type set? Maybe since most of them did circulate, But where does it stop, doubled dies, Type B Washington quarters? I agree with some previous posts - buy an album or a Capital holder and go from there!

  • ChrisH821ChrisH821 Posts: 6,272 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Design strengthening from 1915 to 1916 5C
    The one year type 1921 Buffalo 5C.
    Reverse of 1938/1940 Jefferson 5C

    Collector, occasional seller

  • messydeskmessydesk Posts: 19,594 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @BillJones said:

    @Farmer1961 said:
    Oops 1916 standing quarter

    That coin has enough demand pressure on it already. It’s a not a type coin.

    if you want to go bananas with type coins, there are a different number of rays on the reverse of the late date Peace dollars. I bought one for that reason many years ago. I have weaned myself off of that kind of foolish nit picking.

    The extra rays have been determined to be a result of hand-engraving, not a hub redesign, so you didn't have to pick that nit after all.

  • messydeskmessydesk Posts: 19,594 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited January 17, 2024 8:17AM

    @lsica said:
    Hello Group

    I'm thinking of starting a 20th Century Type Set, but I'm wondering which coins I should include. I've made a list consisting of pieces that are sometimes included and sometimes not, and I'd like to see what the group thinks as to their inclusion...

    >

    Kennedy Clad Reduced Bust 1995-1999

    If you're going to include that, you'll need to include the reduced bust on the Roosevelt dime and the Spaghetti Hair quarters (pre-99). Then there are the assorted reworkings of the Lincoln obverse to consider. For the Washington reverse, there is more than just a type A and B, they go up to H. Lots of levels of detail available if you want it, but it becomes less of a type set and more of a design modification study set. If that's what you want, knock yourself out. You could go through VarietyVista and look for all of the ODV and RDV (Obverse/Reverse Design Variety) listings for your set.

    I have a Dansco for my type set and the only problem I have with the 20th century representation is the fact that there are only two SLQ types, based solely on the reverse design, ignoring the change in the date from "on plinth" to "in exergue."

  • oldabeintxoldabeintx Posts: 1,563 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The Kennedy Accented Hair variety made its way onto my list of type, so I picked one up and compared it to the regular issue. IMO it qualifies as a nit, a minor design adjustment akin to some of the examples above. The word "hype" comes to mind.

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