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Dipping advice for new collectors?

I've been hesitant to try my hand at dipping and wanted to get a few opinions on some raw Morgans that I inherited last year. Most of them look like the 1885 below. I like that type of toning and plan to leave them strictly alone. Some are darkly toned like the first 1886 and I wonder what could be lurking beneath, so will likely use 100% acetone to remove surface debris and leave it at that. The third coin just looks chalky. Not sure if it was the victim of over-zealous dipping at some point, but my thinking was that I can't make it look much worse, so I may use it as a guinea pig after practicing on constitutional silver culls.

Any general suggestions? Do you prefer MS 70, eZest or some other product?

Comments

  • coastaljerseyguycoastaljerseyguy Posts: 1,196 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I'd leave the 85 alone with the rim toning. The 1st 86 looks like it might have dip residue and another dip will do more harm then good. The 2nd 86 might use an acetone bath.

  • @coastaljerseyguy said:
    I'd leave the 85 alone with the rim toning. The 1st 86 looks like it might have dip residue and another dip will do more harm then good. The 2nd 86 might use an acetone bath.

    Glad I asked. She cleaned up pretty well.

  • erwindocerwindoc Posts: 4,884 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I like the 85 as is too. I think both of the 86s could benefit from some MS70. I dont think dipping either would get the results you are looking for as they already look dipped out. I have had really good results with MS70 rolled on with a cotton swab carefully with high grade AU coins to mint state. Anything below AU53 looks bad afterwards. Just be sure to hold on to the coins well as they can get quite slippery with MS70 all over it. Nitrile gloves help too! They are not crazy expensive coins if they get messed up. Be sure to post some before-and-after images. Looks like you already have good photography skills!

  • Thanks. I need to invest in a good macro lens and copy stand because my photos are hit and miss. The one is just took is abysmal, for instance, but hey, the acetone brought out the luster at least.

  • DRUNNERDRUNNER Posts: 3,788 ✭✭✭✭✭

    MS70 is a cleaner (golf ball range). It does not have too much (if any) effect on silver surfaces. Roll your Q-Tip and rinse well. EZ-Est is an acid. This is how coins get screwed up with "repeated dipping". Each EZ-Est bath removes metal, and soon the reflective high points are eaten away. That first dip might do magic and take away detritus or haze. Successive dips as a coin moves down the collector line? Bingo -- goodbye luster.

    The temptation is always, "Will this be the first dip, and if I am REALLY careful, dip it for a short period of time, rinse well, and pay my tithing . . . will I change this 'blech' coin into a gem?"

    Hard to say. Each coin, series, and metal is different . . .

    Drunner

  • @Dave99B said:
    My advice is to NOT dip collector coins.

    Dave

    I can respect that approach.

  • @DRUNNER said:
    MS70 is a cleaner (golf ball range). It does not have too much (if any) effect on silver surfaces. Roll your Q-Tip and rinse well. EZ-Est is an acid. This is how coins get screwed up with "repeated dipping". Each EZ-Est bath removes metal, and soon the reflective high points are eaten away. That first dip might do magic and take away detritus or haze. Successive dips as a coin moves down the collector line? Bingo -- goodbye luster.

    The temptation is always, "Will this be the first dip, and if I am REALLY careful, dip it for a short period of time, rinse well, and pay my tithing . . . will I change this 'blech' coin into a gem?"

    Hard to say. Each coin, series, and metal is different . . .

    Drunner

    Haze is the issue for me. The 85 that I dipped in acetone must've had PVC residue on it, because it came right off. I thought PVC was green. Live and learn.

  • SanctionIISanctionII Posts: 11,586 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Take a variety of coins made of differing metals that are of low value (i.e. junk silver, copper, nickel, etc.), both MS, circulated, Proof and SP. Read up on coin cleaning/dipping. The experiment on these coins with different cleaning agents to see what results you can get.

    Over time doing this will provide you with knowledge gained through experience. Armed with this knowledge you will be able to make better decisions and obtain better results when you graduate to the level of cleaning/dipping collectable coins.

    Good luck.

  • Thanks everyone. I do think the acetone helped, although the coin is still pretty ugly.

  • johnny9434johnny9434 Posts: 27,288 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I like the toning on the 85, I'd leave it alone

  • I'm going to order both eZest and MS 70, then I'll do a lot of experimentation on low value silver before I attempt anything with a Morgan dollar.

    The gold album toning is very nice IMO and I'm not touching it. My only concern is that one of the coins has terminal toning, so I may remove all the coins and store them in capsules.

  • PillarDollarCollectorPillarDollarCollector Posts: 4,573 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited January 4, 2024 12:28PM

    I only use 100% pure acetone keeps the coin looking original and takes off any potential PVC. There is no need for any other dips with other products in my opinion. But like you I learned after trying other ways and in the end acetone is the best.

    Get a glass bottle and metal lid (make sure there is no plastic inside the lid) or glass lid and do each side with fresh acetone for a few hours and then clean the glass bottle with fresh acetone. I rinse my coins with fresh acetone as well once both sides have been done.

    You can't ruin a coin with acetone baths. Unless you rub the coin.

    Interest: Latin American history & coins with an emphasis on colonial coinage from Mexico & Peru

    Sports: NHL & NFL

    Thank you Lord for another beautiful day!!!

  • GaCoinGuyGaCoinGuy Posts: 2,678 ✭✭✭✭

    I have never used MS70, so I will defer to the ones who have on that.

    I have used E-Zest in the past with great success on proof coins (never used it on MS coins). For the proofs, I would use a roughly 50-50 mix of E-Zest and distilled water, followed by a quick swish in pure acetone, and a final rinse with distilled water (usually hot to speed drying time) and pat dry with a soft cloth (do not rub).

    I never let the coins sit in the E-Zest/distilled water more than about 15-20 seconds (usually much less than that would do the trick).

    Definitely practice on some lower value coins.

    imageimage

  • TypekatTypekat Posts: 80 ✭✭✭

    If I owned coin #3 I would dip a Qtip in E-zest and do a quick swipe&rinse on the dark part of her cheeks and see if that darkness come off.
    if it does, try the same approach on the darkness I see on the bottom 1/3 of the obverse.

    At very little risk, You might end up revealing a nice MS coin!

  • @Typekat said:
    If I owned coin #3 I would dip a Qtip in E-zest and do a quick swipe&rinse on the dark part of her cheeks and see if that darkness come off.
    if it does, try the same approach on the darkness I see on the bottom 1/3 of the obverse.

    At very little risk, You might end up revealing a nice MS coin!

    I like that idea. It turned out to be a better coin than I initially thought. Here's the reverse.

  • OwnerofawheatiehordeOwnerofawheatiehorde Posts: 1,430 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I personally dip hazy coins and ones with fingerprints. Only after trying acetone, though.

    Type collector, mainly into Seated. Young Numismatist. Good BST transactions with: mirabela, OKCC, MICHAELDIXON

  • knovak1976knovak1976 Posts: 199 ✭✭✭
    edited January 4, 2024 3:51PM

    Quick question……I bought a nice 1931-S Lincoln from a rather highly respected coin house 30 years ago….and when I sent it in for grading, PCGS slabbed and graded it as ‘questionable color’ …….. At this point it is like an embarrassing junk coin to me. Would acetone, E-Z-EST, or MS70 get the color back to a normal color for resubmission? Thanks….. BTW, it looks like any other brown Lincoln I’ve ever seen which has me scratching my head….

  • TypekatTypekat Posts: 80 ✭✭✭

    No chemicals will restore true original (i.e., gradable) color.

    No worries:
    Brown is a good color for copper, plus it’s in a PCGS holder, therefore guaranteed authentic.

    As is, ir should be easily salable.

  • flyguyflflyguyfl Posts: 115 ✭✭

    @PillarDollarCollector said:
    I only use 100% pure acetone keeps the coin looking original and takes off any potential PVC. There is no need for any other dips with other products in my opinion. But like you I learned after trying other ways and in the end acetone is the best.

    Get a glass bottle and metal lid (make sure there is no plastic inside the lid) or glass lid and do each side with fresh acetone for a few hours and then clean the glass bottle with fresh acetone. I rinse my coins with fresh acetone as well once both sides have been done.

    You can't ruin a coin with acetone baths. Unless you rub the coin.

    Good advice to me. I have three Sac dollars with rust like reverses setting in acetone now. Will not rub when I take them out tomorrow.

  • logger7logger7 Posts: 7,927 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I've seen even experienced long term dealers make silver coins worse with eZ-est. There's "Conserv" which is a petro based product, smells like Turpentine and will remove junk on the surface without negatively impacting the metal. eZ-est works only with some coins usually unc. ones that are darkly toned and never been dipped and fully original, so dark that there is little argument not to conserve. However, PCGS and NGC have the best chemicals and methods, whether they are diluted baths of what we use or special methods. Even Anacs and ICG do conservation now. MS70 seems to help with some coins, others here understand what it does better, but again you can't put the genie back in the bottle so when in doubt don't take the chance. There was a better MS70 made with a now banned chemical. A lot of coins benefit by surface dirt and originality that you don't want to fool with.

  • knovak1976knovak1976 Posts: 199 ✭✭✭

    @Typekat said:
    No chemicals will restore true original (i.e., gradable) color.

    No worries:
    Brown is a good color for copper, plus it’s in a PCGS holder, therefore guaranteed authentic.

    As is, ir should be easily salable.

    Thanks!

  • @logger7 said:
    I've seen even experienced long term dealers make silver coins worse with eZ-est. There's "Conserv" which is a petro based product, smells like Turpentine and will remove junk on the surface without negatively impacting the metal. eZ-est works only with some coins usually unc. ones that are darkly toned and never been dipped and fully original, so dark that there is little argument not to conserve. However, PCGS and NGC have the best chemicals and methods, whether they are diluted baths of what we use or special methods. Even Anacs and ICG do conservation now. MS70 seems to help with some coins, others here understand what it does better, but again you can't put the genie back in the bottle so when in doubt don't take the chance. There was a better MS70 made with a now banned chemical. A lot of coins benefit by surface dirt and originality that you don't want to fool with.

    I might consider third party conservation for a few of the CCs with dark ugly toning.

  • Dilute with distilled water. 70%/30%.

    Rebirth. Renewal. Transformation.

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