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Incandescent light bulbs

seatedlib3991seatedlib3991 Posts: 501 ✭✭✭✭
edited April 7, 2023 7:57AM in U.S. Coin Forum

I have recently learned that they are going to stop selling incandescent light bulbs in August. I have always thought these bulbs do the best job of displaying a coins colors. before I buy a carton of bulbs, does anyone know of a new version bulb that has the same properties? James

Comments

  • SmudgeSmudge Posts: 9,247 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Stock up.

  • telephoto1telephoto1 Posts: 4,740 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I'm not a huge fan of most LED equivalents I've tried...some are ok but the color just isn't the same IMO. Your experience may vary... but if you like them for coin photography, buy a bunch now while you still can.

    Side note to all the car enthusiasts out there... Does anyone know if this will apply to automotive bulb applications as well? If so, that could be problematic, as this would involve electrical work with some older vehicles to be able to make LED equivalents work, if the bulb even has an LED equivalent.


    RIP Mom- 1932-2012
  • bsshog40bsshog40 Posts: 3,775 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @telephoto1 said:
    I'm not a huge fan of most LED equivalents I've tried...some are ok but the color just isn't the same IMO. Your experience may vary... but if you like them for coin photography, buy a bunch now while you still can.

    Side note to all the car enthusiasts out there... Does anyone know if this will apply to automotive bulb applications as well? If so, that could be problematic, as this would involve electrical work with some older vehicles to be able to make LED equivalents work, if the bulb even has an LED equivalent.

    I have an 11 yr old rv that I was able to change out lights to led with no problems. Plugins are the same. I would suspect you could find replacements.

  • 1630Boston1630Boston Posts: 13,772 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @bsshog40 said:

    I have an 11 yr old rv that I was able to change out lights to led with no problems. Plugins are the same. I would suspect you could find replacements.

    .
    I put led headlights on my 2003 wrangler last year, no problem at all :)

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  • jesbrokenjesbroken Posts: 9,264 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited April 6, 2023 9:23AM

    What is the preferrable wattage for photography?
    Jim

    Edited to add: obviously I meant for incandescent, but then maybe not. lol


    When a man who is honestly mistaken hears the truth, he will either quit being mistaken or cease to be honest....Abraham Lincoln

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  • tokenprotokenpro Posts: 846 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Interesting note - I've ordered a few 48 pack GE 100w incandescent bulbs from different sources over the past few years and they have all been Spanish language boxes & 2 pack inner cartons - continued production for world markets with different regulations or or simply ancient dusty inventory? I've had no problem with quality - they pop at the same rate as the former GE bulbs in U.S. packaging. The daylight and other specialty incandescents are definitely rising in price.

    Reminder - it's the start of a new eBay quarter so don't forget to use your store credit

  • telephoto1telephoto1 Posts: 4,740 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @bsshog40 said:

    @telephoto1 said:
    I'm not a huge fan of most LED equivalents I've tried...some are ok but the color just isn't the same IMO. Your experience may vary... but if you like them for coin photography, buy a bunch now while you still can.

    Side note to all the car enthusiasts out there... Does anyone know if this will apply to automotive bulb applications as well? If so, that could be problematic, as this would involve electrical work with some older vehicles to be able to make LED equivalents work, if the bulb even has an LED equivalent.

    I have an 11 yr old rv that I was able to change out lights to led with no problems. Plugins are the same. I would suspect you could find replacements.

    I think on some cars you also have to wire in some weird load equalizing/grounding devices as well or the LED bulbs won't function properly.


    RIP Mom- 1932-2012
  • jfriedm56jfriedm56 Posts: 836 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Known about the discontinuation of incandescent light bulbs for years. Been stocking up but they’re harder and harder to find now. Not a fan of LEDs, bulbs flicker and don’t last long. They’re a joke being shoved down our throats. Was just at a store looking for bulbs and surprisingly found 2-12 count boxes on clearance for $1.99 per box-score!

  • jacrispiesjacrispies Posts: 713 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Uhhhh never thought about my car. I am commited to staying with the classic look on my 1960 corvair so I'll have to stock up.

    "For the wages of sin is death, but the free gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord" Romans 6:23. Young fellow suffering from Bust Half fever.

  • jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,850 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @jfriedm56 said:
    Known about the discontinuation of incandescent light bulbs for years. Been stocking up but they’re harder and harder to find now. Not a fan of LEDs, bulbs flicker and don’t last long. They’re a joke being shoved down our throats. Was just at a store looking for bulbs and surprisingly found 2-12 count boxes on clearance for $1.99 per box-score!

    So your theory is that everyone is faking their data?

  • messydeskmessydesk Posts: 19,681 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @jfriedm56 said:
    Known about the discontinuation of incandescent light bulbs for years. Been stocking up but they’re harder and harder to find now. Not a fan of LEDs, bulbs flicker and don’t last long. They’re a joke being shoved down our throats. Was just at a store looking for bulbs and surprisingly found 2-12 count boxes on clearance for $1.99 per box-score!

    So your theory is that everyone is faking their data?

    Which data? I've replaced several LED bulbs in my house that fail. Shopping for LED bulbs is a nuisance. Unlike incandescent bulbs, when you go to buy a replacement, you have to carefully shop for one that has the same color temperature as other bulbs nearby. Even then, it can be off by a bit. I think the best way to make LED bulbs last as long as advertised is to never turn them off. Power cycles are traumatic to the circuitry of these things.

    That said, I use them for my photos as they stay cool for long sessions (except for the ones that had fake UL markings on them and cracked from overheating).

  • JBKJBK Posts: 14,738 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I was on board with CFL or LED lights for outdoor fixtures, or lights that are always kept on.

    But CFLs damage artwork and fabric. LEDs are not good for every application, either.

    And in the winter months a nearby incandescent light throws off enough heat to be able to avoid turning up the thermostat. (They are also used in well houses and chicken coops for heat.)

    "One size fits all" most certainly does not.

  • SmudgeSmudge Posts: 9,247 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Incandescent bulbs are mostly USA made. Now we can’t have that.

  • telephoto1telephoto1 Posts: 4,740 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @messydesk said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @jfriedm56 said:
    Known about the discontinuation of incandescent light bulbs for years. Been stocking up but they’re harder and harder to find now. Not a fan of LEDs, bulbs flicker and don’t last long. They’re a joke being shoved down our throats. Was just at a store looking for bulbs and surprisingly found 2-12 count boxes on clearance for $1.99 per box-score!

    So your theory is that everyone is faking their data?

    Which data? I've replaced several LED bulbs in my house that fail. Shopping for LED bulbs is a nuisance. Unlike incandescent bulbs, when you go to buy a replacement, you have to carefully shop for one that has the same color temperature as other bulbs nearby. Even then, it can be off by a bit. I think the best way to make LED bulbs last as long as advertised is to never turn them off. Power cycles are traumatic to the circuitry of these things.

    That said, I use them for my photos as they stay cool for long sessions (except for the ones that had fake UL markings on them and cracked from overheating).

    This.
    I've bought some of the LED replacements for some 60-75-100 watt applications around the house, all touted as "lasts 5 years/7years/10years", etc. and so far my best result has been 3 years-most don't make it much past one year. I think your theory of power cycles damaging these is valid. The ones that have lasted longer for me have been the ones that stay on for longer periods of time. Also, the LEDs gradually weaken and the output just isn't the same after a while... so you end up replacing them before they fail anyway.
    We replaced fluorescent tubes in the store with LEDs before Covid and a couple of those failed spectacularly, complete with sparks...


    RIP Mom- 1932-2012
  • jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,850 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited April 6, 2023 10:50AM

    @telephoto1 said:

    @messydesk said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @jfriedm56 said:
    Known about the discontinuation of incandescent light bulbs for years. Been stocking up but they’re harder and harder to find now. Not a fan of LEDs, bulbs flicker and don’t last long. They’re a joke being shoved down our throats. Was just at a store looking for bulbs and surprisingly found 2-12 count boxes on clearance for $1.99 per box-score!

    So your theory is that everyone is faking their data?

    Which data? I've replaced several LED bulbs in my house that fail. Shopping for LED bulbs is a nuisance. Unlike incandescent bulbs, when you go to buy a replacement, you have to carefully shop for one that has the same color temperature as other bulbs nearby. Even then, it can be off by a bit. I think the best way to make LED bulbs last as long as advertised is to never turn them off. Power cycles are traumatic to the circuitry of these things.

    That said, I use them for my photos as they stay cool for long sessions (except for the ones that had fake UL markings on them and cracked from overheating).

    This.
    I've bought some of the LED replacements for some 60-75-100 watt applications around the house, all touted as "lasts 5 years/7years/10years", etc. and so far my best result has been 3 years-most don't make it much past one year. I think your theory of power cycles damaging these is valid. The ones that have lasted longer for me have been the ones that stay on for longer periods of time. Also, the LEDs gradually weaken and the output just isn't the same after a while... so you end up replacing them before they fail anyway.
    We replaced fluorescent tubes in the store with LEDs before Covid and a couple of those failed spectacularly, complete with sparks...

    It could be the house or lamp circuitry that is creating a problem. But the measured lifetimes of LEDs relative to incandescent bulbs in the same usage patterns are significantly longer in all studies I've ever seen. They definitely run cooler and more efficient by about a factor of 10

    The "10 year" lifespan is based on 3 hours per day. The proper comparison is hours of use where LEDs run around 10,000 hours compared to roughly 1500 for incandescent.

  • jfriedm56jfriedm56 Posts: 836 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @jfriedm56 said:
    Known about the discontinuation of incandescent light bulbs for years. Been stocking up but they’re harder and harder to find now. Not a fan of LEDs, bulbs flicker and don’t last long. They’re a joke being shoved down our throats. Was just at a store looking for bulbs and surprisingly found 2-12 count boxes on clearance for $1.99 per box-score!

    So your theory is that everyone is faking their data?

    What data are you referring to? I’m talking about personal experience and others I’ve talked to about the low quality of LEDs. Please don’t put words into my mouth. They are overpriced crappy bulbs that don’t last long or even work. That’s your data.

  • telephoto1telephoto1 Posts: 4,740 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @telephoto1 said:

    @messydesk said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @jfriedm56 said:
    Known about the discontinuation of incandescent light bulbs for years. Been stocking up but they’re harder and harder to find now. Not a fan of LEDs, bulbs flicker and don’t last long. They’re a joke being shoved down our throats. Was just at a store looking for bulbs and surprisingly found 2-12 count boxes on clearance for $1.99 per box-score!

    So your theory is that everyone is faking their data?

    Which data? I've replaced several LED bulbs in my house that fail. Shopping for LED bulbs is a nuisance. Unlike incandescent bulbs, when you go to buy a replacement, you have to carefully shop for one that has the same color temperature as other bulbs nearby. Even then, it can be off by a bit. I think the best way to make LED bulbs last as long as advertised is to never turn them off. Power cycles are traumatic to the circuitry of these things.

    That said, I use them for my photos as they stay cool for long sessions (except for the ones that had fake UL markings on them and cracked from overheating).

    This.
    I've bought some of the LED replacements for some 60-75-100 watt applications around the house, all touted as "lasts 5 years/7years/10years", etc. and so far my best result has been 3 years-most don't make it much past one year. I think your theory of power cycles damaging these is valid. The ones that have lasted longer for me have been the ones that stay on for longer periods of time. Also, the LEDs gradually weaken and the output just isn't the same after a while... so you end up replacing them before they fail anyway.
    We replaced fluorescent tubes in the store with LEDs before Covid and a couple of those failed spectacularly, complete with sparks...

    It could be the house or lamp circuitry that is creating a problem. But the measured lifetimes of LEDs relative to incandescent bulbs in the same usage patterns are significantly longer in all studies I've ever seen. They definitely run cooler and more efficient by about a factor of 10

    The "10 year" lifespan is based on 3 hours per day. The proper comparison is hours of use where LEDs run around 10,000 hours compared to roughly 1500 for incandescent.

    I believe those 10,000 hour numbers are based on continuous use. Most if not virtually all of us don't keep all their lights on 24/7/365. And standard house current is the same whether you use LED or not so I doubt it's the house circuitry if one fries and the other doesn't. I could buy the "bad lamp" theory except it happens in multiple different applications and has occurred in two different physical locations. I guess I could just be colossally unlucky and am always buying only mismanufactured bulbs but I highly doubt that.


    RIP Mom- 1932-2012
  • AUandAGAUandAG Posts: 24,536 ✭✭✭✭✭

    If we made it Medical we could preserve them. Incandescents give off much needed UV light that is needed for proper health. Vitamin D3 is a substitute or going outside is even better. However, I do prefer being inside when I view my coins. People just don't get enough UV as they are not outside like we used to be. Incandescents did help with that problem but the new bulbs have Zero UV radiation.
    bob :)

    Registry: CC lowballs (boblindstrom), bobinvegas1989@yahoo.com
  • jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,850 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @jfriedm56 said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @jfriedm56 said:
    Known about the discontinuation of incandescent light bulbs for years. Been stocking up but they’re harder and harder to find now. Not a fan of LEDs, bulbs flicker and don’t last long. They’re a joke being shoved down our throats. Was just at a store looking for bulbs and surprisingly found 2-12 count boxes on clearance for $1.99 per box-score!

    So your theory is that everyone is faking their data?

    What data are you referring to? I’m talking about personal experience and others I’ve talked to about the low quality of LEDs. Please don’t put words into my mouth. They are overpriced crappy bulbs that don’t last long or even work. That’s your data.

    I didn't put words in your mouth. You said they don't last long. Every study I've seen on LED lifetimes shows them to last longer than incandescent by an order of magnitude. I personally haven't replaced any LEDs in my house in almost a decade of use. I ASKED if you were, therefore, questioning every study from manufacturers to Energy Star to consumer reports.

    It is possible that you have a grounding problem in your house. If they actually stop working, it's the circuitry not the LED itself. Those could be affected by surges and the like that an incandescent might not notice.

  • coastaljerseyguycoastaljerseyguy Posts: 1,243 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Had to replace my Kitchenaid refrigerator LED bulb after only 2 years of service and it was almost $30. I think my old Frigidaire's were < $2 and you could get them anywhere.

  • pruebaspruebas Posts: 4,322 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited April 6, 2023 12:49PM

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @telephoto1 said:

    @messydesk said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @jfriedm56 said:
    Known about the discontinuation of incandescent light bulbs for years. Been stocking up but they’re harder and harder to find now. Not a fan of LEDs, bulbs flicker and don’t last long. They’re a joke being shoved down our throats. Was just at a store looking for bulbs and surprisingly found 2-12 count boxes on clearance for $1.99 per box-score!

    So your theory is that everyone is faking their data?

    Which data? I've replaced several LED bulbs in my house that fail. Shopping for LED bulbs is a nuisance. Unlike incandescent bulbs, when you go to buy a replacement, you have to carefully shop for one that has the same color temperature as other bulbs nearby. Even then, it can be off by a bit. I think the best way to make LED bulbs last as long as advertised is to never turn them off. Power cycles are traumatic to the circuitry of these things.

    That said, I use them for my photos as they stay cool for long sessions (except for the ones that had fake UL markings on them and cracked from overheating).

    This.
    I've bought some of the LED replacements for some 60-75-100 watt applications around the house, all touted as "lasts 5 years/7years/10years", etc. and so far my best result has been 3 years-most don't make it much past one year. I think your theory of power cycles damaging these is valid. The ones that have lasted longer for me have been the ones that stay on for longer periods of time. Also, the LEDs gradually weaken and the output just isn't the same after a while... so you end up replacing them before they fail anyway.
    We replaced fluorescent tubes in the store with LEDs before Covid and a couple of those failed spectacularly, complete with sparks...

    It could be the house or lamp circuitry that is creating a problem. But the measured lifetimes of LEDs relative to incandescent bulbs in the same usage patterns are significantly longer in all studies I've ever seen. They definitely run cooler and more efficient by about a factor of 10

    The "10 year" lifespan is based on 3 hours per day. The proper comparison is hours of use where LEDs run around 10,000 hours compared to roughly 1500 for incandescent.

    Additionally, cheap LED bulbs have cheap electronics, hence fail more quickly.

    Spend the few extra bucks for brand-name bulbs. Hint, ecosmart and FEIT aren’t brand names. They are junk manufactured to meet a price point.

  • jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,850 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @telephoto1 said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @telephoto1 said:

    @messydesk said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @jfriedm56 said:
    Known about the discontinuation of incandescent light bulbs for years. Been stocking up but they’re harder and harder to find now. Not a fan of LEDs, bulbs flicker and don’t last long. They’re a joke being shoved down our throats. Was just at a store looking for bulbs and surprisingly found 2-12 count boxes on clearance for $1.99 per box-score!

    So your theory is that everyone is faking their data?

    Which data? I've replaced several LED bulbs in my house that fail. Shopping for LED bulbs is a nuisance. Unlike incandescent bulbs, when you go to buy a replacement, you have to carefully shop for one that has the same color temperature as other bulbs nearby. Even then, it can be off by a bit. I think the best way to make LED bulbs last as long as advertised is to never turn them off. Power cycles are traumatic to the circuitry of these things.

    That said, I use them for my photos as they stay cool for long sessions (except for the ones that had fake UL markings on them and cracked from overheating).

    This.
    I've bought some of the LED replacements for some 60-75-100 watt applications around the house, all touted as "lasts 5 years/7years/10years", etc. and so far my best result has been 3 years-most don't make it much past one year. I think your theory of power cycles damaging these is valid. The ones that have lasted longer for me have been the ones that stay on for longer periods of time. Also, the LEDs gradually weaken and the output just isn't the same after a while... so you end up replacing them before they fail anyway.
    We replaced fluorescent tubes in the store with LEDs before Covid and a couple of those failed spectacularly, complete with sparks...

    It could be the house or lamp circuitry that is creating a problem. But the measured lifetimes of LEDs relative to incandescent bulbs in the same usage patterns are significantly longer in all studies I've ever seen. They definitely run cooler and more efficient by about a factor of 10

    The "10 year" lifespan is based on 3 hours per day. The proper comparison is hours of use where LEDs run around 10,000 hours compared to roughly 1500 for incandescent.

    I believe those 10,000 hour numbers are based on continuous use. Most if not virtually all of us don't keep all their lights on 24/7/365. And standard house current is the same whether you use LED or not so I doubt it's the house circuitry if one fries and the other doesn't. I could buy the "bad lamp" theory except it happens in multiple different applications and has occurred in two different physical locations. I guess I could just be colossally unlucky and am always buying only mismanufactured bulbs but I highly doubt that.

    Incandescent bulbs don't have any circuitry, just a glowing filament. LEDs have a circuit in them which could (I don't know) be sensitive to grounding issues or power surges which an incandescent would not. As I said in my other comment, I have not replaced an LED in my house in going on 10 years of usage. Most of those bulbs are only on a couple times per day for maybe an hour. The living room and office lights are generally on for 3 to 5 hours per day every day. My outdoor lights are on all night and have been LED for 4 or 5 years now.

    And, less anecdotally, there are literally hundreds of studies showing the cost and lifetime advantages of LEDs, so I'm rather surprised to hear so many people claim that they burn out more quickly.

  • DreamcrusherDreamcrusher Posts: 210 ✭✭✭✭

    @telephoto1 said:
    I'm not a huge fan of most LED equivalents I've tried...some are ok but the color just isn't the same IMO. Your experience may vary... but if you like them for coin photography, buy a bunch now while you still can.

    Side note to all the car enthusiasts out there... Does anyone know if this will apply to automotive bulb applications as well? If so, that could be problematic, as this would involve electrical work with some older vehicles to be able to make LED equivalents work, if the bulb even has an LED equivalent.

    I hope not. I can tell you that I recently bought a set of headlamps that are halogen and designed for 6 volt cars. I am installing them next week. The theory is that they will be brighter and pull the same amount of juice as the old headlights.

  • ElmerFusterpuckElmerFusterpuck Posts: 4,627 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Thought this would be a thread on LED bulbs and coin photography. Instead it turned into a nuclear glow of LED bulb bashing.

    Came in at a 150w strength, left as a flickering 2w with bad filaments....

  • telephoto1telephoto1 Posts: 4,740 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Dreamcrusher said:

    @telephoto1 said:
    I'm not a huge fan of most LED equivalents I've tried...some are ok but the color just isn't the same IMO. Your experience may vary... but if you like them for coin photography, buy a bunch now while you still can.

    Side note to all the car enthusiasts out there... Does anyone know if this will apply to automotive bulb applications as well? If so, that could be problematic, as this would involve electrical work with some older vehicles to be able to make LED equivalents work, if the bulb even has an LED equivalent.

    I hope not. I can tell you that I recently bought a set of headlamps that are halogen and designed for 6 volt cars. I am installing them next week. The theory is that they will be brighter and pull the same amount of juice as the old headlights.

    Halogens are incandescent bulbs. LEDs however may require you to wire in a load stabilizer otherwise they may blink erratically.


    RIP Mom- 1932-2012
  • telephoto1telephoto1 Posts: 4,740 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @pruebas said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @telephoto1 said:

    @messydesk said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @jfriedm56 said:
    Known about the discontinuation of incandescent light bulbs for years. Been stocking up but they’re harder and harder to find now. Not a fan of LEDs, bulbs flicker and don’t last long. They’re a joke being shoved down our throats. Was just at a store looking for bulbs and surprisingly found 2-12 count boxes on clearance for $1.99 per box-score!

    So your theory is that everyone is faking their data?

    Which data? I've replaced several LED bulbs in my house that fail. Shopping for LED bulbs is a nuisance. Unlike incandescent bulbs, when you go to buy a replacement, you have to carefully shop for one that has the same color temperature as other bulbs nearby. Even then, it can be off by a bit. I think the best way to make LED bulbs last as long as advertised is to never turn them off. Power cycles are traumatic to the circuitry of these things.

    That said, I use them for my photos as they stay cool for long sessions (except for the ones that had fake UL markings on them and cracked from overheating).

    This.
    I've bought some of the LED replacements for some 60-75-100 watt applications around the house, all touted as "lasts 5 years/7years/10years", etc. and so far my best result has been 3 years-most don't make it much past one year. I think your theory of power cycles damaging these is valid. The ones that have lasted longer for me have been the ones that stay on for longer periods of time. Also, the LEDs gradually weaken and the output just isn't the same after a while... so you end up replacing them before they fail anyway.
    We replaced fluorescent tubes in the store with LEDs before Covid and a couple of those failed spectacularly, complete with sparks...

    It could be the house or lamp circuitry that is creating a problem. But the measured lifetimes of LEDs relative to incandescent bulbs in the same usage patterns are significantly longer in all studies I've ever seen. They definitely run cooler and more efficient by about a factor of 10

    The "10 year" lifespan is based on 3 hours per day. The proper comparison is hours of use where LEDs run around 10,000 hours compared to roughly 1500 for incandescent.

    Additionally, cheap LED bulbs have cheap electronics, hence fail more quickly.

    Spend the few extra bucks for brand-name bulbs. Hint, ecosmart and FEIT aren’t brand names. They are junk manufactured to meet a price point.

    These home bulbs were mostly GE. The couple of fluorescent replacements that fried were FEIT though and came from Menards. I needed 80 of those. Actually outside of the 2 clunkers, they've actually been the ones that have lasted for 3 years thus far. Go figure.


    RIP Mom- 1932-2012
  • conrad99conrad99 Posts: 345 ✭✭✭

    @pruebas said:

    Additionally, cheap LED bulbs have cheap electronics, hence fail more quickly.

    Spend the few extra bucks for brand-name bulbs. Hint, ecosmart and FEIT aren’t brand names. They are junk manufactured to meet a price point.

    This comports with what I've read on electronics forums. The cheap electronics in the base fail first, often due to inadequate heat sinking.

    Alas, I have LEDs all over my house and it's becoming a horror show of blinking and flickering lights. Additionally, I've replaced some of the more expensive ones over and over in just the last few years.

    So while I appreciate LEDs in theory, in practice it's something else entirely. That said, I'm not likely to go back to high-wattage incandescents. I actually like CFLs but I appear to be a minority of one where that's concerned.

  • pruebaspruebas Posts: 4,322 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @telephoto1 said:

    @pruebas said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @telephoto1 said:

    @messydesk said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @jfriedm56 said:
    Known about the discontinuation of incandescent light bulbs for years. Been stocking up but they’re harder and harder to find now. Not a fan of LEDs, bulbs flicker and don’t last long. They’re a joke being shoved down our throats. Was just at a store looking for bulbs and surprisingly found 2-12 count boxes on clearance for $1.99 per box-score!

    So your theory is that everyone is faking their data?

    Which data? I've replaced several LED bulbs in my house that fail. Shopping for LED bulbs is a nuisance. Unlike incandescent bulbs, when you go to buy a replacement, you have to carefully shop for one that has the same color temperature as other bulbs nearby. Even then, it can be off by a bit. I think the best way to make LED bulbs last as long as advertised is to never turn them off. Power cycles are traumatic to the circuitry of these things.

    That said, I use them for my photos as they stay cool for long sessions (except for the ones that had fake UL markings on them and cracked from overheating).

    This.
    I've bought some of the LED replacements for some 60-75-100 watt applications around the house, all touted as "lasts 5 years/7years/10years", etc. and so far my best result has been 3 years-most don't make it much past one year. I think your theory of power cycles damaging these is valid. The ones that have lasted longer for me have been the ones that stay on for longer periods of time. Also, the LEDs gradually weaken and the output just isn't the same after a while... so you end up replacing them before they fail anyway.
    We replaced fluorescent tubes in the store with LEDs before Covid and a couple of those failed spectacularly, complete with sparks...

    It could be the house or lamp circuitry that is creating a problem. But the measured lifetimes of LEDs relative to incandescent bulbs in the same usage patterns are significantly longer in all studies I've ever seen. They definitely run cooler and more efficient by about a factor of 10

    The "10 year" lifespan is based on 3 hours per day. The proper comparison is hours of use where LEDs run around 10,000 hours compared to roughly 1500 for incandescent.

    Additionally, cheap LED bulbs have cheap electronics, hence fail more quickly.

    Spend the few extra bucks for brand-name bulbs. Hint, ecosmart and FEIT aren’t brand names. They are junk manufactured to meet a price point.

    These home bulbs were mostly GE. The couple of fluorescent replacements that fried were FEIT though and came from Menards. I needed 80 of those. Actually outside of the 2 clunkers, they've actually been the ones that have lasted for 3 years thus far. Go figure.

    GE Lighting was spun off and I believe is now owned by private equity. I have no current experience with these.

    But I have used Philips, Cree, and Osram with excellent results.

  • conrad99conrad99 Posts: 345 ✭✭✭

    Another remark, FWIW. My bedside reading lamp is incandescent and will always be. Simply because nothing dims like an incandescent and I go very very dim as shuteye approaches.

  • BuffaloIronTailBuffaloIronTail Posts: 7,408 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @JBK said:
    I was on board with CFL or LED lights for outdoor fixtures, or lights that are always kept on.

    But CFLs damage artwork and fabric. LEDs are not good for every application, either.

    And in the winter months a nearby incandescent light throws off enough heat to be able to avoid turning up the thermostat. (They are also used in well houses and chicken coops for heat.)

    "One size fits all" most certainly does not.

    They also keep the lenses on stoplights from snow clogging them due to the heat they emit.

    Pete

    "I tell them there's no problems.....only solutions" - John Lennon
  • OwnerofawheatiehordeOwnerofawheatiehorde Posts: 1,517 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I sense somebody with the tag “mod” will show up soon… :D

    Type collector, mainly into Seated. Young Numismatist. Good BST transactions with: mirabela, OKCC, MICHAELDIXON

  • AtcarrollAtcarroll Posts: 343 ✭✭✭

    @BuffaloIronTail said:

    @telephoto1 said:

    @bsshog40 said:

    @telephoto1 said:
    I'm not a huge fan of most LED equivalents I've tried...some are ok but the color just isn't the same IMO. Your experience may vary... but if you like them for coin photography, buy a bunch now while you still can.

    Side note to all the car enthusiasts out there... Does anyone know if this will apply to automotive bulb applications as well? If so, that could be problematic, as this would involve electrical work with some older vehicles to be able to make LED equivalents work, if the bulb even has an LED equivalent.

    I have an 11 yr old rv that I was able to change out lights to led with no problems. Plugins are the same. I would suspect you could find replacements.

    I think on some cars you also have to wire in some weird load equalizing/grounding devices as well or the LED bulbs won't function properly.

    I'm getting sick and tired of being forced to do things........

    Pete

    Agreed. LEDs are cheaper to use and last longer than incandescent bulbs, so demand should diminish for incandescents on its own for most applications, but there are some applications that LEDs are just not suitable for, so both options should be available.

  • rickoricko Posts: 98,724 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I have incandescent, fluorescent and LED lights in the house. The wife only likes incandescent. So I stock all three....Likely have enough of each for another ten years. Cheers, RickO

  • telephoto1telephoto1 Posts: 4,740 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited April 7, 2023 7:38AM

    Bulbs and their use in identification, grading, and coin photography are certainly coin related so this is a very appropriate thread. The types of lights used at coin show tables can also make a difference in how a coin is perceived by a prospective buyer.


    RIP Mom- 1932-2012
  • telephoto1telephoto1 Posts: 4,740 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @jmlanzaf said:

    Incandescent bulbs don't have any circuitry, just a glowing filament. LEDs have a circuit in them which could (I don't know) be sensitive to grounding issues or power surges which an incandescent would not. As I said in my other comment, I have not replaced an LED in my house in going on 10 years of usage. Most of those bulbs are only on a couple times per day for maybe an hour. The living room and office lights are generally on for 3 to 5 hours per day every day. My outdoor lights are on all night and have been LED for 4 or 5 years now.

    And, less anecdotally, there are literally hundreds of studies showing the cost and lifetime advantages of LEDs, so I'm rather surprised to hear so many people claim that they burn out more quickly.

    As we all know, studies/stats about how things SHOULD work and actual experiences are often very different things. I doubt that all the people claiming they aren't lasting as long as advertised are being untruthful. I'm happy you've had good luck with them but that doesn't mean that others aren't so fortunate. Perhaps as production numbers greatly increase due to these types of bulbs being forced into use, the average build quality has declined somewhat?


    RIP Mom- 1932-2012
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