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Edward VII 1910 Half Crown

coinkatcoinkat Posts: 22,662 ✭✭✭✭✭

Our host has not graded a 65 yet... I had no illusion this would get there.

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Comments

  • BillJonesBillJones Posts: 33,364 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Sorry, but I find the modeled reverse on this one unattractive. I traded off a Charles II shilling for exactly that reason. Toning can interfere with my enjoyment of a coin for that reason.

    Retired dealer and avid collector of U.S. type coins, 19th century presidential campaign medalets and selected medals. In recent years I have been working on a set of British coins - at least one coin from each king or queen who issued pieces that are collectible. I am also collecting at least one coin for each Roman emperor from Julius Caesar to ... ?
  • pruebaspruebas Posts: 4,276 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @BillJones said:
    Sorry, but I find the modeled reverse on this one unattractive. I traded off a Charles II shilling for exactly that reason. Toning can interfere with my enjoyment of a coin for that reason.

    I agree with Bill. It hinders enjoying the beauty of the reverse design (the obverse design isn’t anything to write home about ;).

  • coinkatcoinkat Posts: 22,662 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Just some commentary to help put part of this in perspective. Conventional wisdom and thought suggests that a 1910 Half Crown would be fairly available in a reasonably high MS state of preservation. That does not seem to be supported by the facts. PCGS has graded a total of 20 MS example with the highest at 64+. NGC has graded a total of 38 in MS with 1 at 65 and 7 at 64. So my point is we can all talk and opine about rarity, condition rarity and quality for the grade. However, some coins are simply not as readily available as one might think.

    In the matter of taste, there simply is no dispute. This example is original- And one sided mottled toning is not for everyone. But out of the combined total graded we can circle back and look at condition rarity and quality for the grade. We can also suspect that some percentage of the graded population likely have been enhanced mainly in an effort to obtain a higher grade. So there are those graded examples for those that prefer a processed look.

    This coin graded 64 making it among the highest graded at PCGS.

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  • ashelandasheland Posts: 22,558 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I can certainly appreciate the rarity of that one, a nice example sure, the toning may not be the prettiest, but like you said, it’s very original and I like it…

  • 7Jaguars7Jaguars Posts: 7,182 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Indeed, the 1908 and 1910 halfcrowns IMHO and experience are many times not well struck to start with and suffered immediately on striking - have you ever seen what happened to these coins when struck as they rolled down a LONG chute and crashed into essentially a bucket of like pieces? And then sacked up and knocked together in bags for many, many years. I have looked for coins of these years in shilling, florin, and half crown denominations (the florin was and is the biggest bear IMO). I have not slabbed mine, but they may be up there if they were....

    Anyway, although not my taste either, the OP coin is indeed very, very nice...

    Love that Milled British (1830-1960)
    Well, just Love coins, period.
  • ClioClio Posts: 480 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Beautiful example! congrats on the result. Very difficult to get Edward coins of any circulating denom in 65 or higher. I've made a good handful of 64s haha.

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  • coinkatcoinkat Posts: 22,662 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited March 12, 2023 1:40PM

    My grade range on this one was 63-64...

    The takeaway on this is simply that the obverse carries the grade

    Experience the World through Numismatics...it's more than you can imagine.

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