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Ad Featuring NGCX in Today’s WSJ

P0CKETCHANGEP0CKETCHANGE Posts: 2,237 ✭✭✭✭✭

Quarter page ad in the first section, on page A8. Thought it might be of interest to see how this is being marketed to the general population. FWIW, a 2023 1oz NGC MS70 is listed for $2080 on APMEX currently.


Nothing is as expensive as free money.

Comments

  • NeophyteNumismatistNeophyteNumismatist Posts: 874 ✭✭✭✭✭

    World's first... amazing.

    I am a newer collector (started April 2020), and I primarily focus on U.S. Half Cents and Type Coins. Early copper is my favorite.

  • WQuarterFreddieWQuarterFreddie Posts: 2,548 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Kind of like the World's Best Cup Of Coffee!😂🤣

  • WQuarterFreddieWQuarterFreddie Posts: 2,548 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @dsessom said:

    @WQuarterFreddie said:
    Kind of like the World's Best Cup Of Coffee!😂🤣

    You did it! Congratulations!🤣😂

  • BStrauss3BStrauss3 Posts: 3,158 ✭✭✭✭✭

    WSJ ad cost estimator says they paid approx 37k

    https://classified.wsj.com/get-an-estimate/

    -----Burton
    ANA 50 year/Life Member (now "Emeritus")
  • DeplorableDanDeplorableDan Posts: 2,532 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited February 16, 2023 11:32AM

    That's actually a good price considering they give you a free silver eagle, the coins are trading raw on eBay for $1970. I chuckled at "World's First" , " The largest and most respected", and the entire second paragraph.

  • I don’t think the worlds rarest coins will end up in these holders

  • jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,845 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Indianlincoln said:
    I don’t think the worlds rarest coins will end up in these holders

    Not eligible.... yet

  • lilolmelilolme Posts: 2,455 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @Indianlincoln said:
    I don’t think the worlds rarest coins will end up in these holders

    Not eligible.... yet

    If and when they are and they do - will CAC sticker them. :)
    Oh no, not a NGCX and CAC. :D

    https://youtube.com/watch?v=2YNufnS_kf4 - Mama I'm coming home ...................................................................................................................................................................... RLJ 1958 - 2023

  • @jmlanzaf said:

    @Indianlincoln said:
    I don’t think the worlds rarest coins will end up in these holders

    Not eligible.... yet

    Even when they are eligible

  • jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,845 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Indianlincoln said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @Indianlincoln said:
    I don’t think the worlds rarest coins will end up in these holders

    Not eligible.... yet

    Even when they are eligible

    People said the same thing about slabs in the 1980s and 1990s. Now everyone wonders why a rare coin isn't in a slab.

  • 291fifth291fifth Posts: 23,936 ✭✭✭✭✭

    What do the 9.9s look like? ;)

    All glory is fleeting.
  • dsessomdsessom Posts: 2,212 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I am curious to see how the new NGC grading system will go over. I have a feeling it will be like Americans adopting the metric system.

    This caught my eye, "NGC, the largest and most respected coin grading service in the world."

    ...so I thought I'd ask Google;

  • jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,845 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @dsessom said:
    I am curious to see how the new NGC grading system will go over. I have a feeling it will be like Americans adopting the metric system.

    This caught my eye, "NGC, the largest and most respected coin grading service in the world."

    ...so I thought I'd ask Google;

    NGC is bigger. And there are certain market segments where they are the clear leader.

  • jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,845 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @291fifth said:
    What do the 9.9s look like? ;)

    69 on the Amish grading system

  • @jmlanzaf said:

    @dsessom said:
    I am curious to see how the new NGC grading system will go over. I have a feeling it will be like Americans adopting the metric system.

    This caught my eye, "NGC, the largest and most respected coin grading service in the world."

    ...so I thought I'd ask Google;

    NGC is bigger. And there are certain market segments where they are the clear leader.

    You seem to be all in on NGCX.

    Could I ask why you like them so much?

  • DeplorableDanDeplorableDan Posts: 2,532 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Indianlincoln said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @dsessom said:
    I am curious to see how the new NGC grading system will go over. I have a feeling it will be like Americans adopting the metric system.

    This caught my eye, "NGC, the largest and most respected coin grading service in the world."

    ...so I thought I'd ask Google;

    NGC is bigger. And there are certain market segments where they are the clear leader.

    You seem to be all in on NGCX.

    Could I ask why you like them so much?

    @jmlanzaf is reasonable but he likes to play devils advocate. He's not wrong, NGC could be bigger overall and they definitely lead the way with certain segments of the market. For the ad to say " the most respected" is where they went wrong. If they had phrased it as "One of the most..." I wouldn't have chuckled.

  • dsessomdsessom Posts: 2,212 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @DeplorableDan said:

    For the ad to say " the most respected" is where they went wrong. If they had phrased it as "One of the most..." I wouldn't have chuckled.

    Exactly. I have nothing against NGC/PMG, for the record.

  • @DeplorableDan said:

    @Indianlincoln said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @dsessom said:
    I am curious to see how the new NGC grading system will go over. I have a feeling it will be like Americans adopting the metric system.

    This caught my eye, "NGC, the largest and most respected coin grading service in the world."

    ...so I thought I'd ask Google;

    NGC is bigger. And there are certain market segments where they are the clear leader.

    You seem to be all in on NGCX.

    Could I ask why you like them so much?

    @jmlanzaf is reasonable but he likes to play devils advocate. He's not wrong, NGC could be bigger overall and they definitely lead the way with certain segments of the market. For the ad to say " the most respected" is where they went wrong. If they had phrased it as "One of the most..." I wouldn't have chuckled.

    I have no problem buying an ngc coin , even though my collection is all pcgs

    Just personally I feel like Pcgs is the best grading service, especially give the fact I like high grade, key date, US coins

    I don’t mess with bullion, world coins, tokens, medals, ect. So excuse my ignorance. Maybe NGC is better for those things

  • jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,845 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Indianlincoln said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @dsessom said:
    I am curious to see how the new NGC grading system will go over. I have a feeling it will be like Americans adopting the metric system.

    This caught my eye, "NGC, the largest and most respected coin grading service in the world."

    ...so I thought I'd ask Google;

    NGC is bigger. And there are certain market segments where they are the clear leader.

    You seem to be all in on NGCX.

    Could I ask why you like them so much?

    My comments have nothing to do with NGCX. NGC is the major force in ancients, for example.

    As for NGCX, I like NGCX because it is intuitive and easy to marker. It has the potential to open up the coin market to new participants with cross marketing strategies. It may or may not work but it's worth a try.

    Find a non collector and ask them if they would buy "a 70". Find a different person and ask them if they would buy "a 10". 70 sounds like a barely passing grade, especially to collectors of anything but coins.

  • jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,845 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @DeplorableDan said:

    @Indianlincoln said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @dsessom said:
    I am curious to see how the new NGC grading system will go over. I have a feeling it will be like Americans adopting the metric system.

    This caught my eye, "NGC, the largest and most respected coin grading service in the world."

    ...so I thought I'd ask Google;

    NGC is bigger. And there are certain market segments where they are the clear leader.

    You seem to be all in on NGCX.

    Could I ask why you like them so much?

    @jmlanzaf is reasonable but he likes to play devils advocate. He's not wrong, NGC could be bigger overall and they definitely lead the way with certain segments of the market. For the ad to say " the most respected" is where they went wrong. If they had phrased it as "One of the most..." I wouldn't have chuckled.

    I was just pointing out that it wasn't as inaccurate as people seemed to be alleging. PCGS is barely a player in some non-US segments. For example, if I search "NGC" on ebay in the ancients category, I get 14,000+ hits. If I do the same with "PCGS", I get 65 - and some of those are actually NGC holders.

    This is not to say anything negative about either company.

  • @jmlanzaf said:

    @Indianlincoln said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @dsessom said:
    I am curious to see how the new NGC grading system will go over. I have a feeling it will be like Americans adopting the metric system.

    This caught my eye, "NGC, the largest and most respected coin grading service in the world."

    ...so I thought I'd ask Google;

    NGC is bigger. And there are certain market segments where they are the clear leader.

    You seem to be all in on NGCX.

    Could I ask why you like them so much?

    My comments have nothing to do with NGCX. NGC is the major force in ancients, for example.

    As for NGCX, I like NGCX because it is intuitive and easy to marker. It has the potential to open up the coin market to new participants with cross marketing strategies. It may or may not work but it's worth a try.

    Find a non collector and ask them if they would buy "a 70". Find a different person and ask them if they would buy "a 10". 70 sounds like a barely passing grade, especially to collectors of anything but coins.

    I suppose I’m not so interested in expanding the coin market. The coins I collect will always be of value to people and will withstand the test of time

    I like the 70 Sheldon scale because that’s how I grew up and am less concerned with how it sounds to a new collector

  • jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,845 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Indianlincoln said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @Indianlincoln said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @dsessom said:
    I am curious to see how the new NGC grading system will go over. I have a feeling it will be like Americans adopting the metric system.

    This caught my eye, "NGC, the largest and most respected coin grading service in the world."

    ...so I thought I'd ask Google;

    NGC is bigger. And there are certain market segments where they are the clear leader.

    You seem to be all in on NGCX.

    Could I ask why you like them so much?

    My comments have nothing to do with NGCX. NGC is the major force in ancients, for example.

    As for NGCX, I like NGCX because it is intuitive and easy to marker. It has the potential to open up the coin market to new participants with cross marketing strategies. It may or may not work but it's worth a try.

    Find a non collector and ask them if they would buy "a 70". Find a different person and ask them if they would buy "a 10". 70 sounds like a barely passing grade, especially to collectors of anything but coins.

    I suppose I’m not so interested in expanding the coin market. The coins I collect will always be of value to people and will withstand the test of time

    I like the 70 Sheldon scale because that’s how I grew up and am less concerned with how it sounds to a new collector

    Your coins will only maintain their value if there are future collectors in the same number as current collectors. People should not assume that is a given since the American birth rate is abysmal and most population growth is due to immigration. Will immigrants choose to collect 19th century US coins or the coins of their fatherland?

  • Jzyskowski1Jzyskowski1 Posts: 6,651 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Uncle Rick sez the Smithsonian’s collection are housed in NGC. Could be , never visited, but “the Cameo King” wouldn’t fib😁

    🎶 shout shout, let it all out 🎶

  • WQuarterFreddieWQuarterFreddie Posts: 2,548 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @Indianlincoln said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @Indianlincoln said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @dsessom said:
    I am curious to see how the new NGC grading system will go over. I have a feeling it will be like Americans adopting the metric system.

    This caught my eye, "NGC, the largest and most respected coin grading service in the world."

    ...so I thought I'd ask Google;

    NGC is bigger. And there are certain market segments where they are the clear leader.

    You seem to be all in on NGCX.

    Could I ask why you like them so much?

    My comments have nothing to do with NGCX. NGC is the major force in ancients, for example.

    As for NGCX, I like NGCX because it is intuitive and easy to marker. It has the potential to open up the coin market to new participants with cross marketing strategies. It may or may not work but it's worth a try.

    Find a non collector and ask them if they would buy "a 70". Find a different person and ask them if they would buy "a 10". 70 sounds like a barely passing grade, especially to collectors of anything but coins.

    I suppose I’m not so interested in expanding the coin market. The coins I collect will always be of value to people and will withstand the test of time

    I like the 70 Sheldon scale because that’s how I grew up and am less concerned with how it sounds to a new collector

    Your coins will only maintain their value if there are future collectors in the same number as current collectors. People should not assume that is a given since the American birth rate is abysmal and most population growth is due to immigration. Will immigrants choose to collect 19th century US coins or the coins of their fatherland?

    You are walking a fine line....how is the view from that cliff?😂🤣

  • @jmlanzaf said:

    @Indianlincoln said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @Indianlincoln said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @dsessom said:
    I am curious to see how the new NGC grading system will go over. I have a feeling it will be like Americans adopting the metric system.

    This caught my eye, "NGC, the largest and most respected coin grading service in the world."

    ...so I thought I'd ask Google;

    NGC is bigger. And there are certain market segments where they are the clear leader.

    You seem to be all in on NGCX.

    Could I ask why you like them so much?

    My comments have nothing to do with NGCX. NGC is the major force in ancients, for example.

    As for NGCX, I like NGCX because it is intuitive and easy to marker. It has the potential to open up the coin market to new participants with cross marketing strategies. It may or may not work but it's worth a try.

    Find a non collector and ask them if they would buy "a 70". Find a different person and ask them if they would buy "a 10". 70 sounds like a barely passing grade, especially to collectors of anything but coins.

    I suppose I’m not so interested in expanding the coin market. The coins I collect will always be of value to people and will withstand the test of time

    I like the 70 Sheldon scale because that’s how I grew up and am less concerned with how it sounds to a new collector

    Your coins will only maintain their value if there are future collectors in the same number as current collectors. People should not assume that is a given since the American birth rate is abysmal and most population growth is due to immigration. Will immigrants choose to collect 19th century US coins or the coins of their fatherland?

    That seems pretty presumptuous

    For example I’m sure an 1877 Indian head in ms64 rb will only be going up in value the next 20 years. And when it is time to sell plenty of people will be interested in buying it

    What you’re saying sounds like collectors of key date US coins won’t exist in 20-30 years and that is comical

    NGCX is not carrying coin collecting on its back, even if they do grade more ancient or foreign coins

    US coin series will always be in demand

  • dsessomdsessom Posts: 2,212 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Indianlincoln I agree, especially if the US mint stops making coins, which seems like a possibility in the relatively near future, since the bulk of commerce today is done electronically. Might be 20 years, might be 50 years away, but I fear that it's inevitable eventually.

    IF this happens, then all existing coinage will become a rarity, and the rare coins of today will become super rarities.

  • Jzyskowski1Jzyskowski1 Posts: 6,651 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited February 16, 2023 3:21PM

    @dsessom said:
    @Indianlincoln I agree, especially if the US mint stops making coins, which seems like a possibility in the relatively near future, since the bulk of commerce today is done electronically. Might be 20 years, might be 50 years away, but I fear that it's inevitable eventually.

    IF this happens, then all existing coinage will become a rarity, and the rare coins of today will become super rarities.

    What about the rest of the world ? The United States is a very small part of the world of commerce. How many atms are you gunna find in underdeveloped or behind the curve, nations.
    Seems narrow sighted to judge the world by US standards. Coins been around for a long long long time. No
    more Roman Empire but the coins are popular. 😁🙀

    🎶 shout shout, let it all out 🎶

  • coinbufcoinbuf Posts: 10,752 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Indianlincoln said:
    NGCX is not carrying coin collecting on its back, even if they do grade more ancient or foreign coins
    US coin series will always be in demand

    You do not seem very interested in learning about NGCX only bashing it. NGCX only grades modern coins, there are no ancient coins in those holders now, only modern US coins. And I do not recall anyone saying that US coins will not be in demand, but that demand could drop as the demographics change.

    My Lincoln Registry
    My Collection of Old Holders

    Never a slave to one plastic brand will I ever be.
  • @coinbuf said:

    @Indianlincoln said:
    NGCX is not carrying coin collecting on its back, even if they do grade more ancient or foreign coins
    US coin series will always be in demand

    You do not seem very interested in learning about NGCX only bashing it. NGCX only grades modern coins, there are no ancient coins in those holders now, only modern US coins. And I do not recall anyone saying that US coins will not be in demand, but that demand could drop as the demographics change.

    I just have an opinion that pcgs is better

    In my opinion

    I honestly wish the best for the company. And I won’t say oh I’ll never buy an NGCX.
    And if it’s good for the hobby, then I’m all for it

    A 10 year old buys an NGCX slab. Then a few more. Then learns some more. Keeps going down the vast rabbit hole coin collecting is. Then wants to be like the old collectors he looks up to

    When I was young I remember learning that coins had “numismatic value” that idea drove me crazy and made me fall in love with the hobby

    I’m all for anything that helps the youth. Or anything that makes the youth enjoy a hobby the same as mine

  • jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,845 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Indianlincoln said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @Indianlincoln said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @Indianlincoln said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @dsessom said:
    I am curious to see how the new NGC grading system will go over. I have a feeling it will be like Americans adopting the metric system.

    This caught my eye, "NGC, the largest and most respected coin grading service in the world."

    ...so I thought I'd ask Google;

    NGC is bigger. And there are certain market segments where they are the clear leader.

    You seem to be all in on NGCX.

    Could I ask why you like them so much?

    My comments have nothing to do with NGCX. NGC is the major force in ancients, for example.

    As for NGCX, I like NGCX because it is intuitive and easy to marker. It has the potential to open up the coin market to new participants with cross marketing strategies. It may or may not work but it's worth a try.

    Find a non collector and ask them if they would buy "a 70". Find a different person and ask them if they would buy "a 10". 70 sounds like a barely passing grade, especially to collectors of anything but coins.

    I suppose I’m not so interested in expanding the coin market. The coins I collect will always be of value to people and will withstand the test of time

    I like the 70 Sheldon scale because that’s how I grew up and am less concerned with how it sounds to a new collector

    Your coins will only maintain their value if there are future collectors in the same number as current collectors. People should not assume that is a given since the American birth rate is abysmal and most population growth is due to immigration. Will immigrants choose to collect 19th century US coins or the coins of their fatherland?

    That seems pretty presumptuous

    For example I’m sure an 1877 Indian head in ms64 rb will only be going up in value the next 20 years. And when it is time to sell plenty of people will be interested in buying it

    What you’re saying sounds like collectors of key date US coins won’t exist in 20-30 years and that is comical

    NGCX is not carrying coin collecting on its back, even if they do grade more ancient or foreign coins

    US coin series will always be in demand

    They don't have to cease to exist. They just need to be fewer in number. The point is that EVERYONE needs the hobby to be growing. It is actually presumptuous to assume someone is going to automatically want your coins, even without new collectors.

  • jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,845 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @dsessom said:
    @Indianlincoln I agree, especially if the US mint stops making coins, which seems like a possibility in the relatively near future, since the bulk of commerce today is done electronically. Might be 20 years, might be 50 years away, but I fear that it's inevitable eventually.

    IF this happens, then all existing coinage will become a rarity, and the rare coins of today will become super rarities.

    Have you seen what happened to European coins post-Euro?

  • jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,845 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Jzyskowski1 said:

    @dsessom said:
    @Indianlincoln I agree, especially if the US mint stops making coins, which seems like a possibility in the relatively near future, since the bulk of commerce today is done electronically. Might be 20 years, might be 50 years away, but I fear that it's inevitable eventually.

    IF this happens, then all existing coinage will become a rarity, and the rare coins of today will become super rarities.

    What about the rest of the world ? The United States is a very small part of the world of commerce. How many atms are you gunna find in underdeveloped or behind the curve, nations.
    Seems narrow sighted to judge the world by US standards. Coins been around for a long long long time. No
    more Roman Empire but the coins are popular. 😁🙀

    Actually, other parts of the world are much farther along in going cashless.

  • dsessomdsessom Posts: 2,212 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @jmlanzaf said:

    They don't have to cease to exist. They just need to be fewer in number. The point is that EVERYONE needs the hobby to be growing. It is actually presumptuous to assume someone is going to automatically want your coins, even without new collectors.

    I agree 100%, and that's exactly why I often give coins away to friends, family and kids - to try to spark an interest, because that's how I got started.

  • jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,845 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @WQuarterFreddie said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @Indianlincoln said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @Indianlincoln said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @dsessom said:
    I am curious to see how the new NGC grading system will go over. I have a feeling it will be like Americans adopting the metric system.

    This caught my eye, "NGC, the largest and most respected coin grading service in the world."

    ...so I thought I'd ask Google;

    NGC is bigger. And there are certain market segments where they are the clear leader.

    You seem to be all in on NGCX.

    Could I ask why you like them so much?

    My comments have nothing to do with NGCX. NGC is the major force in ancients, for example.

    As for NGCX, I like NGCX because it is intuitive and easy to marker. It has the potential to open up the coin market to new participants with cross marketing strategies. It may or may not work but it's worth a try.

    Find a non collector and ask them if they would buy "a 70". Find a different person and ask them if they would buy "a 10". 70 sounds like a barely passing grade, especially to collectors of anything but coins.

    I suppose I’m not so interested in expanding the coin market. The coins I collect will always be of value to people and will withstand the test of time

    I like the 70 Sheldon scale because that’s how I grew up and am less concerned with how it sounds to a new collector

    Your coins will only maintain their value if there are future collectors in the same number as current collectors. People should not assume that is a given since the American birth rate is abysmal and most population growth is due to immigration. Will immigrants choose to collect 19th century US coins or the coins of their fatherland?

    You are walking a fine line....how is the view from that cliff?😂🤣

    Not at all. Just stating a fact. Demographics are changing. Nothing wrong with that, but one has to acknowledge the changes or risk the fallout.

  • jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,845 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @dsessom said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    They don't have to cease to exist. They just need to be fewer in number. The point is that EVERYONE needs the hobby to be growing. It is actually presumptuous to assume someone is going to automatically want your coins, even without new collectors.

    I agree 100%, and that's exactly why I often give coins away to friends, family and kids - to try to spark an interest, because that's how I got started.

    Good on you.

    And that's why I'm embracing the possibility of NGCX helping. People talk about it like it has to be all of nothing. Most change happens in the edge of the curve, not the whole curve. When Apple stock goes down, it's not because nobody wants it. It's just because a few people are jumping out and nobody wants to jump in at that level.

    NGCX doesn't have to take over the entire market to be successful. It just needs to create a little incremental interest.

  • FrazFraz Posts: 1,827 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited February 16, 2023 5:33PM

    @jmlanzaf said:
    NGCX doesn't have to take over the entire market to be successful. It just needs to create a little incremental interest.

    Not many businesses look as far into the future as NGCX appears to see. Sticking to modern coins where beginners begin is a good idea. NGC has plenty of old clients.

    What @cladking says supports interest in modern clad rarities; not just gut, data.

    @jmlanzaf said:
    Your coins will only maintain their value if there are future collectors in the same number as current collectors. People should not assume that is a given since the American birth rate is abysmal and most population growth is due to immigration.

    That’s when buying gets good.

    @jmlanzaf said:
    Will immigrants choose to collect 19th century US coins or the coins of their fatherland?

    They sell pocket change on eBay, so I guess it leans toward domestic.

    Good read.

  • logger7logger7 Posts: 8,069 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I've been hearing a lot of coin related ads on conservative radio, such as numismatic discoveries where original rolls of
    1904-o Morgan dollars being discovered with the coins original like just from the mint, or other trusted gold dealers by a radio host. You have to wonder how many newbie collectors get turned off to the hobby due to sales pressure?

  • MasonGMasonG Posts: 6,268 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @logger7 said:
    I've been hearing a lot of coin related ads on conservative radio, such as numismatic discoveries where original rolls of
    1904-o Morgan dollars being discovered with the coins original like just from the mint, or other trusted gold dealers by a radio host. You have to wonder how many newbie collectors get turned off to the hobby due to sales pressure?

    There's no good reason to bring politics into the discussion.

  • jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,845 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @logger7 said:
    I've been hearing a lot of coin related ads on conservative radio, such as numismatic discoveries where original rolls of
    1904-o Morgan dollars being discovered with the coins original like just from the mint, or other trusted gold dealers by a radio host. You have to wonder how many newbie collectors get turned off to the hobby due to sales pressure?

    Some. But if advertising didn't work, it wouldn't exist.

  • logger7logger7 Posts: 8,069 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I listen to radio a lot, I was just saying that some of the stations I listen to advertise collectibles, whether Walking liberty halves, Unc. Morgan dollars or bullion. I just hope the sellers treat the customers right.

  • NJCoinNJCoin Posts: 1,420 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @logger7 said:
    I've been hearing a lot of coin related ads on conservative radio, such as numismatic discoveries where original rolls of
    1904-o Morgan dollars being discovered with the coins original like just from the mint, or other trusted gold dealers by a radio host. You have to wonder how many newbie collectors get turned off to the hobby due to sales pressure?

    ????? For better or worse, it's the "sales pressure" that brings them in. Conservative radio has nothing to do with anything, other than the fact that its audience is the target demo for the ads.

  • NJCoinNJCoin Posts: 1,420 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @logger7 said:
    I listen to radio a lot, I was just saying that some of the stations I listen to advertise collectibles, whether Walking liberty halves, Unc. Morgan dollars or bullion. I just hope the sellers treat the customers right.

    Don't worry, they won't. As you pointed out in your earlier post, the products touted in mass market radio, TV and newspaper ads are done so in a misleading way, to people who don't know any better, at very inflated prices that cover the cost of the advertising in addition to profits to the sellers.

    The buyers generally have no idea what they are doing, and the sellers are not the trusted dealers one would find here, or at a show. The closest people will come to being treated right will be if the sellers honor a return policy, if one is offered. Otherwise, buyers are buying common crap at inflated prices, whether it's "among the very first" 2023 Eagles or "Fine or Better" 1904-O Morgan Dollars.

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