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1944 Wheat Penny

I'm a newbie who just joined.
I haven't joined any grading companies as of now. This 1944 wheat penny I have has silver undertones and very little copper shown. I recently purchased a coin microscope and that's when I discovered this unique penny.
I'm well aware of this year going back to copper. It is non-magnetic, so I can only assume it is Aluminum, Silver or Zinc.
It weighs 3 G on a cheap scale purchased from Amazon.
Any thoughts?

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    jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,885 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited February 15, 2023 10:00AM

    Why did it have any copper showing? If it had any, it's copper and probably plated. A normal copper cent is also nonmagnetic.

    At 3 grams the weight is correct for copper and incorrect for steel, aluminum or zinc.

    Pictures would help but 99.999999% sure it is plated.

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    JBKJBK Posts: 14,748 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Could be dipped in mercury as was sometimes done in science class years ago.

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    FrazFraz Posts: 1,837 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Welcome. Embrace the wisdom of the experts who want to teach us. Resistance is futile.

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    JimnightJimnight Posts: 10,812 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Sometimes intense heat will turn the copper a silver tone.

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    ifthevamzarockinifthevamzarockin Posts: 8,498 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Welcome to the forum! :)

    Many things can cause discolorations on coins.
    These were done with heat, they are not plated or off metals.
    (Please note the silver penny) ;)

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    How do I upload a photo?

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    bearcavebearcave Posts: 3,993 ✭✭✭✭✭

    :o

    Ken
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    bearcavebearcave Posts: 3,993 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I don't know why it done that above. I do know I got on the wrong button. I'll say how you upload a picture.

    Ken
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    bearcavebearcave Posts: 3,993 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The last button that looks like a scene is the one to punch and look for your picture.

    Ken
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    dsessomdsessom Posts: 2,212 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Jerry_Oakes It's the far right icon at the top of a new post. See below;

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    Sorry, not the best photos.

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    Any answers?

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    ifthevamzarockinifthevamzarockin Posts: 8,498 ✭✭✭✭✭

    This photo makes it appear to be plated and the plating is flaking off.

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    dsessomdsessom Posts: 2,212 ✭✭✭✭✭

    My guess is what @JBK said. Back in the 50's and 60's, sometimes people would coat a penny with mercury to turn it silver. I can't remember the reason why they did it, but I have heard about that happening, and have seen a few.

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    So based on the weight it's probably copper?
    I had hoped to be sitting on a gold mine, lol.

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    ifthevamzarockinifthevamzarockin Posts: 8,498 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Sorry, no for you. :/

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    FrazFraz Posts: 1,837 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @dsessom said:
    My guess is what @JBK said. Back in the 50's and 60's, sometimes people would coat a penny with mercury to turn it silver. I can't remember the reason why they did it, but I have heard about that happening, and have seen a few.

    Mercury from a broken older thermometer coated many pennies. We did it. I have a one centimeter blob of quicksilver from an antique that I broke a Xmas time. I ought to see how many 1944s it colors.

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    rickoricko Posts: 98,724 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Jerry_Oakes .... Your cent has been plated or mercury coated - we used to coat cents with mercury in high school chemistry class... just rub it on with our fingers... No cautions at that time about the dangers of mercury contact. Anyway, unfortunately, no numismatic premium for your cent. Cheers, RickO

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