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Vintage Bank Wrapped Rolls...Franklin Halves, Quarters, Dimes, Etc...

Hi Everybody! This is my first post ever on here, as far as I can recall...so, with that, I wanted to introduce myself and present with my current passion in the ever-changing and growing field of numismatics...and, IMO, this is an ever-changing and growing field, even though the younger generations may tell us that it's all in cryptocurrencies and Bitcoin these days.

So I've gotten onto vintage bank wrapped rolls these days...I read an article or two online about this, and did some studying about the very subject...even went to my trusted local jeweler and coin dealer in town, and inquired there about these. I've found lots of interesting information, and to me, this is like collecting something else vintage, like vintage Hankscraft and/or Gerber cool mist vaporizers, or humidifiers one might be more apt to call them. (Loved these as a child, by the way).

Does anyone have any viewpoint on the vintage coin rolls that are available on eBay, or maybe even better, say Apmex? I've found the prices to be quite steep on these things, and have tried to research from all angles how unscrupulous folks, collectors (or really those who are disguised as collectors) could more or less forge a roll of these things and make them look real. Firstly, and another question, do you think that if a company like Apmex sells these things and presents them as original bank wrapped coin rolls, that they could be held liable for (or anyone on eBay, for that matter) a breach of trust and/or whatever the charge might be, of falsifying information and presenting product that is not genuine? I mean, I don't want to bad mouth any companies nor individuals on here, as I know it's probably against the rules of this forum. And please excuse me if I appear to be (moderators, I ask that you remove this post if it's deemed against the rules).

Thank you for letting me introduce myself, and to express my current passion and interest in numismatics...BANK WRAPPED ROLLS! Been even dreaming about them lately. lol

  • "I love Numismatics. I've always loved Numismatics. If I was insane, I would love Numismatics. If I were sane, I would love Numismatics. Numismatics, and Writing, are my Life." - This New Dealer

Comments

  • WQuarterFreddieWQuarterFreddie Posts: 2,548 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Welcome and good luck with the hunt!

  • FrazFraz Posts: 1,794 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Welcome. Cool idea. Nothing to offer in your search, except to practice common sense. Good luck.

  • dealer6871dealer6871 Posts: 31
    edited January 26, 2023 11:28PM

    @WQuarterFreddie said:
    Welcome and good luck with the hunt!

    Thanks, @WQuarterFreddie. I'll need the luck wish, I believe.

    @Fraz said:
    Welcome. Cool idea. Nothing to offer in your search, except to practice common sense. Good luck.

    Thanks to you as well, @Fraz! Appreciate the advice. Forgot to mention that I'm working on reading two books, The Profit March of Your Coin Investment by G.W. Haylings, and Strike It Rich With Silver In Coin Rolls by David J. Conway. Both interesting reads.

    • "I love Numismatics. I've always loved Numismatics. If I was insane, I would love Numismatics. If I were sane, I would love Numismatics. Numismatics, and Writing, are my Life." - This New Dealer
  • AUandAGAUandAG Posts: 24,532 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Welcome and yes, good luck with that. I love to get rolls in collections but I'm the type that searches each and every one. Other than Rosies, I don't search them.
    bob :)

    Registry: CC lowballs (boblindstrom), bobinvegas1989@yahoo.com
  • @AUandAG said:
    Welcome and yes, good luck with that. I love to get rolls in collections but I'm the type that searches each and every one. Other than Rosies, I don't search them.
    bob :)

    Thanks, @AUandAG (bob)...Sounds like a good idea to search them, though I've been told by another gentleman in the field of Numismatics that if the roll is disturbed, it might make it worth less to the collector, or, even more importantly, maybe a buyer who might consider buying something like this. I'm fascinated with these vintage things, either way...though it seems to be real difficult to find them wholesale, or, for that matter, the ability to buy them in their original wrappers. A lot of sellers who are offering these (at least one or two that I can think of) are putting them in plastic tubes and selling them that way. Seems like an easy way to "cherry pick," but then, who am I to judge. :)

    • "I love Numismatics. I've always loved Numismatics. If I was insane, I would love Numismatics. If I were sane, I would love Numismatics. Numismatics, and Writing, are my Life." - This New Dealer
  • nwcoastnwcoast Posts: 2,837 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited January 27, 2023 12:58AM

    Welcome to the forum!

    Actual “vintage” or original,unsearched rolls are not as common as one might be led to believe.
    The vast majority of the rolls advertised on EBay, are NOT original and are put together to look like they’re holding some treasures. Be especially wary of rolls that appear to have something especially enticing visible on the ends. Paper rolled Morgan dollars are a construct of slick marketers out to dupe unsuspecting collectors. Morgan dollars were, for the most part, actually stored in canvas bags back when they were in commerce.

    That’s not to say that original bank rolls don’t exist.
    I inherited a hoard that had been put away in 1964 which consisted of many dozens of original bank rolls from that year and earlier. There were also original rolls of uncirculated Franklin halfs- in tight plastic tubes along with several rolls of Morgan and Peace dollars that were in snap top plastic tubes. The Silver dollar rolls were “put together rolls” from that period.

    I actually sold a couple of my old dime rolls on EBay as original- unsearched rolls just to test the waters and they didn’t sell for any more than normal bullion rolls- much to my disappointment. That was seven or so years back now though. I know for a fact my rolls were unopened and unsearched so they ARE occasionally out there- but pretty rare in my view.

    Finding the real thing from estates and old collections is conceivable, and many big dealers do have volumes of original cent and nickel rolls if that’s what your into as well.

    Good luck!
    Roll searching is indeed a blast!

    Happy, humble, honored and proud recipient of the “You Suck” award 10/22/2014

  • JimnightJimnight Posts: 10,804 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Very risky business ... but fun! Good luck

  • FrazFraz Posts: 1,794 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The CR sold me four wraps last week that appear to be bank rolls of circulated cents from 70s or 80s judging by the style of the wrap.
    Funny thing is, I fooled myself. I make nice clean tight wraps and select the end coins.
    I got a roll of quarters from the Petro Mart that had Samoas on both ends, tight, tucked, and rounded. It was a roll that I had returned weeks earlier.

  • rickoricko Posts: 98,724 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @dealer6871 ... Welcome aboard. The 'original wrapped roll' market is rife with already searched rolls that have been re-wrapped. That being said, there are occasional finds out there. Years ago, I purchased some cent rolls - still have them, never opened. 1943 cents. And some rolls from the Mint. Now, I would have to see the rolls in hand before I would purchase them. Good luck, have fun.... Cheers, RickO

  • CuprinkorCuprinkor Posts: 199 ✭✭✭

    Go to as many b&m coin shops you can drive to and see if there are any for sale.
    That way you can inspect them in hand.

  • CuprinkorCuprinkor Posts: 199 ✭✭✭

    Maybe the shops can save any for you in the future if you let they know you have an interest in such rolls.

  • davewesendavewesen Posts: 5,832 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Do you just keep the 'rolls' as part of your collection? When I buy a roll, almost always it is to open and search for something. I do have some relatively newer cent and nickel rolls (60's and 70's) that I have not yet, and not sure if I will.

    I am not sure I could identify an original 'bank wrapped' roll.

  • FrazFraz Posts: 1,794 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited January 27, 2023 9:13AM

    @BStrauss3 said:
    Buy new paper wrappers, a wrapping doohicky, and a tea bag. Age paper wrappers. Buy culls and a few decent raw coins. Fill wrappers. Sell for big money to idjits on fleaBay. Lather, Rinse, Repeat.

    I concocted this in five minutes.

    Reuse an old wrap. Write a fake SS or account number with an old ballpoint pen on the roll.

  • cladkingcladking Posts: 28,328 ✭✭✭✭✭

    There are very very few old rolls of coins. Indeed, there are very very few coins that were circulating many years ago in any storage media. Simply stated circulating coins mostly just circulate. Very few ever sit out of circulation as a group for more than a few years. You can look everywhere but you aren't going to find rolls of clad quarters that circulated in 1969, '79, '89, '99, or '09. With effort you might find some from 2019. The same thing applies to pennies but to a far lesser extent. After 1982 you can find them but before about 1962 you can not.

    If you found old rolls the end coins would probably be common date, of very recent vintage, and in very high grade mostly AU's and XF's. I hope this isn't used by the fraudsters to "improve" their product.

    Pay attention to the way coins circulate and you'll quickly realize that things just don't work this way. A roll set aside in the '40's, if there were such a thing, is far more likely to have an XF+ 1942-D on the end than a worn out '33-D. If by chance there were a '33-D on the end it would be a nice low end VF. Sampling end coins is a highly effective method for "seeing" what's inside whether they are BU rolls or circs.

    Tempus fugit.
  • nwcoastnwcoast Posts: 2,837 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Here’s a sampling of the real thing.
    A time capsule from 1964 though the nickel rolls were aquired later. I believe them to be original.
    I crack open a dime roll here an there for kicks. Surprisingly, there are very few Mercury dimes in the mix.


    Happy, humble, honored and proud recipient of the “You Suck” award 10/22/2014

  • davewesendavewesen Posts: 5,832 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I am surprised how many big silver roll lots are in pre-Long Beach Goldbergcoins auction going on right now.

  • Namvet69Namvet69 Posts: 8,662 ✭✭✭✭✭

    In my experience, original rolls are crimped very very very tight. And because the paper is rolled inward and in a spiral, this self locking design does not come loose by itself. Good luck and study about what is described, hopefully you won't get burned too badly. Peace Roy

    BST: endeavor1967, synchr, kliao, Outhaul, Donttellthewife, U1Chicago, ajaan, mCarney1173, SurfinHi, MWallace, Sandman70gt, mustanggt, Pittstate03, Lazybones, Walkerguy21D, coinandcurrency242 , thebigeng, Collectorcoins, JimTyler, USMarine6, Elkevvo, Coll3ctor, Yorkshireman, CUKevin, ranshdow, CoinHunter4, bennybravo, Centsearcher, braddick, Windycity, ZoidMeister, mirabela, JJM, RichURich, Bullsitter, jmski52, LukeMarshall

  • dsessomdsessom Posts: 2,212 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I am 53 years old, and have come across exactly ONE original pre-1964 bank roll of coins in my lifetime. It was a roll of nickels that I found in a dresser drawer that I inherited which had been owned by my grandmother, and great grandmother before that. Most were circulated 30's and 40's nickels. None were worth much, but it was still a fun find.

  • logger7logger7 Posts: 8,069 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Mr. Nachbar had a large group of Roosies in bank wrapped rolls around 1999 at Baltimore show before they took off. Once the prices spike, even on the moderns in high grade, the cherry picking gets fierce.

  • cladkingcladking Posts: 28,328 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @dsessom said:
    I am 53 years old, and have come across exactly ONE original pre-1964 bank roll of coins in my lifetime. It was a roll of nickels that I found in a dresser drawer that I inherited which had been owned by my grandmother, and great grandmother before that. Most were circulated 30's and 40's nickels. None were worth much, but it was still a fun find.

    Exactly!

    All of the scarce dates were pretty much gone by the end of WW II. You might still find some semi-key dates in high grade if you were lucky but the coins were mostly picked over. By the mid-'50's when I started there just wasn't much of anything unless you got very lucky or looked at a lot of coins. A neighbor found a nice VG+ '32-S quarter is a roll but such thing were the exception. Circulating coinage didn't get interesting again until the late-'70's then it peaked around 2005. Even today there are a lot of surprises and tough coins out there. But you aren't going to find any old circ rolls.

    Tempus fugit.
  • coinbufcoinbuf Posts: 10,751 ✭✭✭✭✭

    There are lots of BU and circ rolls out there, but unless you stumble upon an unknown hoard form an estate where the rolls were put away decades ago, most to all will not be original. Coin dealers have lots of time on their hands and many have become very adept at rerolling these "original" rolls you see on fleebay.

    To the OP, I would suggest that you rethink your choice, you could have some fun but be very much in the hole financially.

    My Lincoln Registry
    My Collection of Old Holders

    Never a slave to one plastic brand will I ever be.
  • pmh1nicpmh1nic Posts: 3,137 ✭✭✭✭✭

    What are the diagnostics to determine if a roll is originally wrapped? Actually (excuse my ignorance) is an originally wrapped roll a roll that was wrapped by the mint or a roll wrapped by a bank that received a bag of coins from the mint? Did the mint ever roll coins?

    The longer I live the more convincing proofs I see of this truth, that God governs in the affairs of men. And if a sparrow cannot fall to the ground without His notice is it possible for an empire to rise without His aid? Benjamin Franklin
  • MasonGMasonG Posts: 6,268 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @coinbuf said:
    Coin dealers have lots of time on their hands and many have become very adept at rerolling these "original" rolls you see on fleebay.

    I'm sure there must be some with time on their hands but all the dealers I know are far too busy to fool around with something like that. IMO, the rerolling is more likely to be done by cherrypicking collectors.

  • FlyingAlFlyingAl Posts: 2,845 ✭✭✭✭✭

    This thread will be of interest to those here:
    https://forums.collectors.com/discussion/1081286/a-super-cool-item-i-found-in-gc-archives#latest

    @pmh1nic, the Federal Reserve wrapped coins for the mint. See the link above for an explanation.

    Young Numismatist, Coin Photographer.

  • Dave99BDave99B Posts: 8,352 ✭✭✭✭✭

    There are original rolls out there. There used to be a seller on eBay with the name of 'Redbook'. Looks like it's no longer a register user name. He had great original Federal Reserve rolls ... primarily dimes, nickels, and cents. I bought and sold many of his rolls. Wish I had bought more.

    Dave

    Always looking for original, better date VF20-VF35 Barber quarters and halves, and a quality beer.
  • WCCWCC Posts: 2,352 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @291fifth said:
    I think you are setting yourself up to take big losses on any purchases you make. Read through as many threads on this site as possible and I think you will see why I think this. Forget about watching videos on the internet about making big money in coins by searching rolls or buying so-called "original bank wrapped rolls".

    There is an article on Coin Week I read years ago advocating the purchase of OBW rolls for financial reasons. I don't remember the author being explicit and he didn't provide any specifics (not even one example), but the tone made no sense to me. It sounded more than just buying it for the coins that might be in it, but due to the paper wrapper.

    I can see buying these rolls at "modest" prices but that's all. Outside of outliers like the 1912-S or 1912-D nickels which surfaced several years ago, any coin existing in high grade by the roll is far too common. Even the 1912-S in gem isn't scarce, now.

  • orevilleoreville Posts: 11,779 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I used to buy obw rolls from cents to halves back in the 1960’s through the 1990’s.

    Virg Marshall from Nebraska was a great source for obw unc wheat cent rolls as late as the late 1990’s. I bought hundreds of his obw rolls priced at $3 or less (each) from him. Still have them.

    A Collectors Universe poster since 1997!
  • cladkingcladking Posts: 28,328 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @WCC said:

    There is an article on Coin Week I read years ago advocating the purchase of OBW rolls for financial reasons. I don't remember the author being explicit and he didn't provide any specifics (not even one example), but the tone made no sense to me. It sounded more than just buying it for the coins that might be in it, but due to the paper wrapper.

    There's one thing about original rolls; they are easily wholesaled. If you check an original roll for Gems and varieties you will almost invariably be disappointed AND the roll will become almost impossible to sell because they are almost invariably spotted or tarnished. But sell them in the wrapper and you let the buyer take the risk and the opportunity.

    Obviously most silver rolls are OK and if there were clad rolls these would usually be OK. Pennies and nickels are more problematical and the older they are the worse they have fared. Nickels can usually be cleaned but not cents. Zinc cents are usually bad even though they are newer and memorial rolls except the pre-1972 are often fine.

    Most BU rolls are one cent coins.

    Tempus fugit.
  • jmski52jmski52 Posts: 22,358 ✭✭✭✭✭

    About the time that I joined the forum, I was on the hunt for original, pre-1965 bankwrapped rolls of silver - and everything I bought was from someone on ebay. I did end up with numerous original rolls from various sources, and also a fair number of them that were NOT original. I'd say that maybe 25% of the rolls had been previously opened and cherrypicked.

    The only reason that my percentage of original rolls was as high as 75% was because when I found a seller who had multiple rolls that were genuinely original, I would go back for more before they were sold out. One of those sellers was Mad Marty who used to post here.

    My best "score" was an older guy from NYC who had a stash of dimes & quarters from 1958-1959 that had been in a safe deposit box all those years. He was liquidating a bunch of rolls five at a time so that he could run off to Florida with his girlfriend. B) After seeing the real thing in my first order from him, I bought a bunch of them. My avatar toner is from that group, and I still have it in it's original roll.

    At the time, I was in search of end roll toners, so I could justify paying a nominal premium over a generic BU roll.

    I was lucky one day to see a roll of 1964 Kennedy Halves in a roll with flapped ends that the owner had spread out for a better photo shoot on ebay. The photos were all pretty dark and hard to evaluate, but the coins all looked pretty toned - so I took a chance and bought the roll even though it had flapped ends and had been opened. Several people on this forum doubted that the toning was legit, among them were both Russ and Rosie, so I sent one of them to Russ and he approved so much that he submitted the coin to PCGS and it came back MS-66. I subsequently submitted most of the coins from that roll and ended up with a bunch of certified Kennedy toners in high grade.

    One of my best finds was a seller who had some original rolls from F.J.Vollmer Co. I had done business with Vollmers many years earlier, so I knew who they were and that they had been dealers in BU rolls at one time. I bought 2 nice rolls of 1958 & 1959 Franklin Halves with nice looking end roll toners, which I still have. I even followed up with the seller and got copies of the Vollmer invoices from when his dad had bought them in 1981.

    I don't know if ebay would still afford the same possibilities these days, but you truly never know until you start the hunt.

    One additional thought, you can sometimes find nice BU coins that have been stored in the older plastic tubes, which is kind of an indication that the roll was bought to remain as a complete roll - and those types of rolls are likely to be fresh as they were 50 years ago. Maybe they've been picked over, but maybe not. Just a thought.

    Lastly, the frauds that sell made-up rolls should be banned from ebay, if not prosecuted. jmho

    Q: Are You Printing Money? Bernanke: Not Literally

    I knew it would happen.
  • cladkingcladking Posts: 28,328 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @jmski52 said:

    One additional thought, you can sometimes find nice BU coins that have been stored in the older plastic tubes, which is kind of an indication that the roll was bought to remain as a complete roll - and those types of rolls are likely to be fresh as they were 50 years ago. Maybe they've been picked over, but maybe not. Just a thought.

    It's hardly unusual that picked over rolls and sets are actually much better than average. Many BU rolls were placed into plastic tubes for protection and it usually worked.

    Nice coins are where you find them.

    Tempus fugit.
  • Thanks, all, for your feedback thus far. I really enjoy reading your posts, and appreciate the discussion. Learning a lot here, and getting lots of good input. I picked up another book entitled, A Guidebook of Franklin & Kennedy Half Dollars and cracked it open to some of the 1954 Franklin half dollars, where I just happened to pick up a roll (see avatar too). I understand Rick Tomaska is a rather big name in collecting, and I just happened too to see him on streaming Hulu TV the other day while the regularly scheduled programming was put on hold for the late night viewers. This is an exciting little "niche," as it were, of numismatics and coin collecting in general. There seem to be a couple of articles out there that suggest that this niche in numismatics might just come around again and become very profitable at another future point, if not so already. This third book that I mention cites "rolls" quite often, and it seems that these BU rolls, which likely contain a number of MS-63 to MS-65 or even higher coins, exist in a number of these rolls. I haven't opened mine...just salivated over it quite a bit. lol

    • "I love Numismatics. I've always loved Numismatics. If I was insane, I would love Numismatics. If I were sane, I would love Numismatics. Numismatics, and Writing, are my Life." - This New Dealer
  • DCWDCW Posts: 6,970 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Fraz said:

    @BStrauss3 said:
    Buy new paper wrappers, a wrapping doohicky, and a tea bag. Age paper wrappers. Buy culls and a few decent raw coins. Fill wrappers. Sell for big money to idjits on fleaBay. Lather, Rinse, Repeat.

    I concocted this in five minutes.

    Reuse an old wrap. Write a fake SS or account number with an old ballpoint pen on the roll.

    This is like a MasterClass in roll wrapping rules. 😆

    Dead Cat Waltz Exonumia
    "Coin collecting for outcasts..."

  • OnastoneOnastone Posts: 3,777 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited January 29, 2023 6:59AM

    Welcome @dealer6871 Good luck on your OBW roll search. I found an article from CoinWeek from Aug 2021

    "There are a few features that collectors should look for before buying what is offered as an original bank-wrapped roll of coins.

    First, the paper wrapper should appear as old as the coins that reside inside it. Rarely did a Federal Reserve bank or receiving bank hold the coins very long after their receipt. Holding a bag would tie up capital and lose the interest it could have earned.

    Next, as stated earlier, there is typically an inscription of the bank that produced the roll and/or the company that manufactured and supplied the paper used in its wrapping. Also, for coins produced prior to the mid-1970s the wrapper should be of a solid color. Further, prior to the 1970s rarely did a bank mix coins from different years, or both uncirculated and circulated coins, in the same roll.

    During the 1970s striped wrappers began to appear. At first, they were utilized along with the earlier solid wrappers. Later, the uniform-colored wrappers were gradually discontinued in favor of the striped rolls.

    Importantly, both ends of a roll should appear tightly coiled, intact, and untampered with.
    Occasionally, only one end was machine wrapped, with the other end neatly and firmly folded. Additionally, the coins should feel tightly wrapped within the paper.

    Further, it is normal to find OBW rolls with some degree of toning on the outside coins. This is due to the coin’s contact with the paper wrapper and its long exposure to air. The paper normally contained some sulfur. Because of its close contact with the end coins, the oxidation process took over and often “toned” the exposed end coins to varying degrees"

    ....pretty interesting...!

    don't forget these can be pretty easily faked, easier than counterfeiting coins!!! Like@BStrauss3 said:

    Buy new paper wrappers, a wrapping doohicky, and a tea bag. Age paper wrappers. Buy culls and a few decent raw coins. Fill wrappers. Sell for big money to idjits on fleaBay. Lather, Rinse, Repeat.

  • FrazFraz Posts: 1,794 ✭✭✭✭✭

    These are how I describe rolls. Will you guys pitch in to tweak the terminology?

    Roll and wrap are interchangeable terms when they are filled with coins.

    Wrap refers to the empty tube.

    Roll is a filled tube

    MACHINE WRAPPED:

    Mint roll with the fancy wraps

    OBW original bank roll: need some clarification, maybe?
    —new, uncirculated, wrapped into a roll from bags from the mint for the first time by banks?
    —anything in addition to banks?

    Bank roll— bank wrap
    —circulated coins from commerce, vending machine concessionaires, COINSTAR, outfits that wrap coins mechanically. Coin wranglers.

    NON-MECHANICALLY WRAPPED (hand-wrapped)

    Home wraps:
    —honest change jar fodder, unexamined coins
    —vintage home wraps

    Collector wraps:
    —recent cull wraps
    —vintage cull wraps
    —sorted wraps
    —vintage sorted wraps
    —crap wraps, e.g.: fifty filthy zincolns

    Dealer wraps:
    —honest
    —salted end coins

    Thank you, guys.

  • DCWDCW Posts: 6,970 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @DCW said:

    @Fraz said:

    @BStrauss3 said:
    Buy new paper wrappers, a wrapping doohicky, and a tea bag. Age paper wrappers. Buy culls and a few decent raw coins. Fill wrappers. Sell for big money to idjits on fleaBay. Lather, Rinse, Repeat.

    I concocted this in five minutes.

    Reuse an old wrap. Write a fake SS or account number with an old ballpoint pen on the roll.

    This is like a MasterClass in roll wrapping ruse. 😆

    Edited for autocorrect

    Dead Cat Waltz Exonumia
    "Coin collecting for outcasts..."

  • FrazFraz Posts: 1,794 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited January 29, 2023 9:08AM

    @DCW said:

    Edited for autocorrect

    We call it autocorrupt.

  • BStrauss3BStrauss3 Posts: 3,144 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Fraz said:

    @DCW said:
    Edited for autocorrect

    We call autocorrupt.

    You missed the trademark symbol because for sure it's a registered trademark: AutoKorrupt®

    -----Burton
    ANA 50 year/Life Member (now "Emeritus")
  • BStrauss3BStrauss3 Posts: 3,144 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Fraz since the mint stopped wrapping coins (except for collector sales), the Fed deliveries go to the Contracted Coin Terminals in 1-ton ballistic nylon bags. From those - along with coins returned by the CCT's customers - they are counted, rolled, boxed, and distributed to the CCT's customers.

    Not sure how you differentiate...

    OBW has the connotation of being "old" as in older coins either uncirculated or from contemporaneous circulation.

    An "OBW" showing a Buffalo nickel is likely pretending to be wrapped by a bank in the 1920s or 1930s.

    -----Burton
    ANA 50 year/Life Member (now "Emeritus")
  • FrazFraz Posts: 1,794 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I did not differentiate between current and vintage in my terms above.
    I did make a distinction between circulated and uncirculated.
    How about an unopened bank roll of coins of the same year?

    If one end has been open—is it a bank roll any longer? Not original any longer, anyhow.

    I found a hoard of wheats that had been picked fifty years ago.
    There are rolls of BU coins, in original wrappers, with an opened end.

    Ya just gotta spell it out.
    Thanks, @BStrauss3 feel free to clarify. Anyone.

  • Hi All...little update...I was at the financial institution that just happens to be printed on the vintage wrapped bank roll that I have (at an undisclosed location, of course...lol)...I was going to inquire, with one or more photos of the roll, to a financial institution professional, but got shot down, so to speak, when I approached (kids, don't do this at home) an armored car employee (or two...one with a shotgun, I guess...though I didn't know this until afterwards)...to...what else? Inquire about bank rolls. (Autofill said "robbery" here, but I inserted and completed with "rolls"). Folks, don't ever get too serious about something like this...lesson well learned...you don't want to risk your life to feed your Family. You can probably guess what my, as Pink Floyd might call it, "Momentary lapse of reason" earned...a profane warning to "back up" and a name calling. I was a bit surprised, but spoke with my family about it afterwards. I know...sounds crazy...like I said, "Lesson well learned...in The Twilight Zone," as the old Rod Serling might state on his old show. :o

    • "I love Numismatics. I've always loved Numismatics. If I was insane, I would love Numismatics. If I were sane, I would love Numismatics. Numismatics, and Writing, are my Life." - This New Dealer

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