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I had a bulk submission done, should I upload all of the inventory?

I had bulk done on 1964 1 c, they graded MS64-MS66, I thought they were SMS, however should I upload all as inventory?, I have never done a set registry?.. so I really don't know what the heck I am doing. All but 9 of my 50 coins graded MS 64 and higher

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    rsei0120rsei0120 Posts: 127 ✭✭

    Wow thank you so very much, this is exciting....

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    TomBTomB Posts: 20,733 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @rsei0120 said:
    I had bulk done on 1964 1 c, they graded MS64-MS66, I thought they were SMS, however should I upload all as inventory?, I have never done a set registry?.. so I really don't know what the heck I am doing. All but 9 of my 50 coins graded MS 64 and higher

    Did you submit a bunch of 1964 Lincoln cents in the hope that they were SMS? If so, that is a very expensive tuition payment in your journey to learning about coins. PCGS will only recognize SMS coinage from 1964 if it came from the estate of thee Mint Director at that time and has the paperwork to prove the coins came from the estate. All of the coins that qualify for SMS from 1964 have already been submitted for certification and they will not certify more from 1964 with that designation.

    You may want to ask questions on the boards before you submit more coins. Good luck!

    Thomas Bush Numismatics & Numismatic Photography

    In honor of the memory of Cpl. Michael E. Thompson

    image
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    davewesendavewesen Posts: 5,856 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I do not upload any unless I am putting in a registry set. I will need to remove any that I sell.

    Amazing speed on my last submission which was quarterly special. 20 bulk in encapsulation in less than 2 weeks.

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    NorCalJackNorCalJack Posts: 517 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Well I upload all of my submissions into inventory. It is a great way to see all of the coins you have. You don't have to add any to a set registry. I have a lot of duplicate coins that are not in a registry set, but in my inventory. You can make notes to your self on what you paid for the coins and who you purchased them from. It is a great way to track your inventory.

    I know you inherited most of your coins, but it is still nice to have an inventory of your collection.

    Best of Luck.

    Jay

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    sorry pictures are not that good

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    rsei0120rsei0120 Posts: 127 ✭✭

    Thank you all so very much, when I submitted the bulk, I was afraid of the expense of not knowing , so I put on that it had to be as least an MS64 and above, lol, on my 1964 D I said MS 67, know most wouldn't, and then on my 1964's, all of the 50 but 9 were MS64, MS65, MS66, so that one was a little expense around $700, but yes I will take your advice and it was quick turn around I heard at least 3 months, but the bulk was fast, however I sent some others in and it still shows their in grading, I sent
    1909 1c VDB RB
    1909 S 1c VDB,
    1868 2C BN
    1851 1c Braided Harir Cent
    1868 3c Nickel
    1856 10c Liberty Seated dime sm date
    1857 10c Liberty Seated dime Sma date
    1914-S 1C Type 1 Wheat Reverse MS
    1914-D 1c Type 1, Wheat Reverse MS
    1922 No D 1 c Strong Reverse
    I am still waiting on those, I sent them the same time as the bulk

    I am getting ready to send in my 1982 1C transitions, collection
    I also have 4 of the 1982 D small date, that are the 3.1 g sending in.

    I thought I would try NGC this time, What is your recommendation

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    TomBTomB Posts: 20,733 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Of the additional coins you submitted some are obviously better dates, but without images there isn't a whole lot one can contribute.

    However, I question why you would submit 1982-D small date cents. You would need a minimum MS67RD grade to be ahead on the submission costs associated with the coins if submitted through PCGS, and may even lose money even at that grade if submitted through NGC. The most recent PCGS MS66RD example I could find sold at auction at $22 in 2020. I don't really know what the 1982 one cent transitions collection is, but wonder if it's simply the marketing scheme name for the large and small date copper (bronze) and zinc cents issued from 1982. If so, then they generally need to be MS66RD and/or MS67RD to break even or make money. These 1982 cents appear to me to be a money-pit for submission costs and a great way to lose money on your part.

    Thomas Bush Numismatics & Numismatic Photography

    In honor of the memory of Cpl. Michael E. Thompson

    image
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    rsei0120rsei0120 Posts: 127 ✭✭

    When I submit, I do it where that is the least grade accepted, that is what I did on my bulk, that way if it is not in the grade that I need, it is a $7 return fee, These are close to that grade, however it is always a crap shoot, the 1982 D's with small date, that are actually copper or bronze are the ones hard to find, out of 78 1982-d, I found 4 that match what I was looking for, when I do submit, I try to find the best of only what would most likely bring best return if I decide to sell, some are just the fact I have found one., I am still trying to understand the selling and buying, I mean I watch the auctions, I see 2 coins the same, however one will sell for $200, and another for $7,000, and not just the grade, I look and I think what makes this one worth so much more to someone. I have a 1944 dime, she is beautiful to me, I am thinking wow look how good she looks at her age, the toning is so unique she has her full bars, would she make an MS67 doubtful, but she has this look that makes you wander what she has been through. I will try and take some good pictures of the 1982, and see what you think, I am always open for advice....

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    TomBTomB Posts: 20,733 ✭✭✭✭✭

    If you find auctions for apparently identical coins that sell for $200 vs. $7,000 (as an example) you should link them in a question on the US Coin board and ask why there is the difference. Someone is likely to know or have a pretty good pulse on that segment of the market.

    Thomas Bush Numismatics & Numismatic Photography

    In honor of the memory of Cpl. Michael E. Thompson

    image
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    rsei0120rsei0120 Posts: 127 ✭✭

    I have and HA are not very forthcoming with answers...Now Stacks and Bowers are not too bad at answering, and NGC is interested in our 1982....lol, However so say the 1964 MS63 in 2003 Sold at Auction for $2,588, however shouldn't you be able to sell your MS64 for that much at least now?.maybe a little more, it is still the same rare coin, all I see is value dropped to sometimes $24..it seams that not always a good investment, when they drop in price drastically, that is something wrong with that picture, it would be like in 2003 your house appraised at $200,000 so then in 2022 your neighbors house appraised at $550,000, so should your house only stay at $200,000 or should it not at least appraise higher.. But again just like buying a good horse, it is only worth as much as someone is willing to pay for it. What is your opinion on all this...I am curious...and Thank you so very much for answering

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    TomBTomB Posts: 20,733 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @rsei0120 said:
    I have and HA are not very forthcoming with answers...Now Stacks and Bowers are not too bad at answering, and NGC is interested in our 1982....lol, However so say the 1964 MS63 in 2003 Sold at Auction for $2,588, however shouldn't you be able to sell your MS64 for that much at least now?.maybe a little more, it is still the same rare coin, all I see is value dropped to sometimes $24..it seams that not always a good investment, when they drop in price drastically, that is something wrong with that picture, it would be like in 2003 your house appraised at $200,000 so then in 2022 your neighbors house appraised at $550,000, so should your house only stay at $200,000 or should it not at least appraise higher.. But again just like buying a good horse, it is only worth as much as someone is willing to pay for it. What is your opinion on all this...I am curious...and Thank you so very much for answering

    You mentioned the 2003 auction for an MS63 1964 Lincoln cent in the thread linked below-

    https://forums.collectors.com/discussion/1085851/pricing-of-coins#latest

    I responded that it was likely either actually one of the rare, legitimate SMS cents or that it was likely a wild error. It turns out that another member hunted down the auction information and it appeared to be a very rare cloverleaf error graded MS63. Here is an image of it below-

    Therefore, that old auction record has no bearing on your coin unless your coin is one of those errors.

    My opinion, which you asked for in the question above, is that you're at the stage where your enthusiasm is far greater than the depth of knowledge as to how the market works. This is fine and most of us had been there at one point while many on the boards still are at that place.

    When I write that you should ask questions on the US Coin forum, I am not writing that you should ask the auction house (HA, SB, etc...) as they have much more pressing matters and will either not respond or will respond late. You have access to many, many knowledgeable folks on the US Coin forum section of this site, but when you ask questions on sub-forums that are less busy, such as the Registry or BST forums, then you will get far less traction, many fewer responses and much less information. You should also, when asking a question, have the specifics and possibly images as well so that others will not have to take the time and research the details of your questions.

    If you dive into numismatics too deeply and too quickly you can end up losing a ton of money even if you are dealing with a large, inherited collection. Take your time, ask questions, make certain the details are clear and then move forward. None of us did this perfectly and none of us had all the patience that we preach to others. Good luck!

    Thomas Bush Numismatics & Numismatic Photography

    In honor of the memory of Cpl. Michael E. Thompson

    image
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    rsei0120rsei0120 Posts: 127 ✭✭

    I am going to listen to all of you, because I can see me getting into trouble,....I appreciate your honesty and yes I will be ask y'all a bunch of questions and show and tell. Thank you all. so very very much, I remember taking flying lessons, my dad told me the worlds most dangerous pilot is the one with 200 hours.

    thank you again

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    davewesendavewesen Posts: 5,856 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Now what are you going to do with 41 PCGS graded 1964 Lincoln cents? On eBay the fixed priced ones that sold could get your grading fees back. Going other routes will eat you up in sellers commissions.

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    rsei0120rsei0120 Posts: 127 ✭✭

    Actually sell some (hopefully). I really hadn't thought that many would actually grade for ms 65 / ms 66 so my first lesson.so at least make my grading costs, keep one of the MS 66 for my registry, Sell on Ebay if possible, forget the auctions LOL., I have ideas for little give aways on getting leads on my real estate business, which has been pretty good,

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