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The Semiquincentennial Program for 2026

The US Mint is planning to consider designs for the obverse and/or reverse of all circulating denominations for 2026. What do you think about this from the prospects of increasing the awareness of the general public and of increasing the interests of collectors? What designs in your mind best represent America's pride of its past, appreciation of the present, and embrace of hope for its future?

Casabrown

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    Jzyskowski1Jzyskowski1 Posts: 6,651 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Absolutely Ricko.
    Wash, rinse, repeat 🔁🙏

    🎶 shout shout, let it all out 🎶

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    CasabrownCasabrown Posts: 2,126 ✭✭✭

    I certainly cannot dispute your comments. With challenges, past, present, or future, there are potential opportunities.

    If we offer at this stage ideas for designs, there is a potential for them to be considered. Even if you are pessimistic (and I am again, not disputing your reasons for being so), like the lottery, you can't win it if you are not in it.

    For this reason and because the 250th anniversary happens only once, why not take the shot of offering what you might believe is a memorable design for the obverse or reverse? Don't we owe it to our children, our grandchildren, and other generations to follow.

    Remember what happened with the State Quarters program and this program is for all the circulating denominations. I guess despite my decades as a collector, I remain an optimist or a glass half-full guy.

    Let's continue this thread with offering suggestions and I am committed to advance them for consideration.

    Casabrown

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    WillieBoyd2WillieBoyd2 Posts: 5,037 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 10, 2022 12:59PM

    Semiquincentennial?

    :)

    https://www.brianrxm.com
    The Mysterious Egyptian Magic Coin
    Coins in Movies
    Coins on Television

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    WCCWCC Posts: 2,373 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Casabrown said:
    The US Mint is planning to consider designs for the obverse and/or reverse of all circulating denominations for 2026.

    I'm in favor of it. It's actually something worth commemorating, as opposed to many recent themes which aren't.

    @Casabrown said:
    What do you think about this from the prospects of increasing the awareness of the general public and of increasing the interests of collectors?

    I don't know about Increasing the interest of collectors. How?

    Increasing public awareness in collecting? I doubt it. These coins will be buried in almost 30 years of continuous design change by 2026. It's not like the bicentennial coinage where there had been no changes since the Kennedy half.

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    CasabrownCasabrown Posts: 2,126 ✭✭✭

    Keep the comments coming.

    For clarification, semiquincentennial is 250th anniversary.

    There are at least two populations:

    1. General public: increase awareness of the anniversary and perhaps increase interests in collectors
    2. Collectors: increased interest in the changes in the designs for the obverse and/or reverse of all circulating denominations.

    Again, keep the comments coming on the themes you think would be attractive and if possible specify why.

    Many thanks

    Casabrown

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    CasabrownCasabrown Posts: 2,126 ✭✭✭

    By the way, Happy Veterans Day.

    Would an appreciation of our military be an important theme to include for the 250th anniversary?

    Casabrown

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    CasabrownCasabrown Posts: 2,126 ✭✭✭

    ttt

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    CasabrownCasabrown Posts: 2,126 ✭✭✭

    No suggestions?

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    ifthevamzarockinifthevamzarockin Posts: 8,498 ✭✭✭✭✭

    "Would an appreciation of our military be an important theme to include for the 250th anniversary?"

    Something with Army, Navy, Air Force & Marines spelled out with a old cannon or cannon & sword fashioned after some of the Civil War Tokens might look nice on one the the denominations. It would need to be a simple, clean design and not try to fit too much on the coin. Some of the new designs like in the Statehood or Women's quarters get a little busy with too many design elements. The 2021 Quarter with the old obverse design in slightly higher relief appealed to many collectors. Some other higher relief designs would be nice if it doesn't cause striking problems for the mint.

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    CasabrownCasabrown Posts: 2,126 ✭✭✭

    Given our recent celebration of Veterans Day, your suggestions are relevant.

    Many thanks

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    CasabrownCasabrown Posts: 2,126 ✭✭✭

    ttt

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    CasabrownCasabrown Posts: 2,126 ✭✭✭

    ttt

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    I would love to see Gasparro's Liberty design that was on the pattern small dollar in 1977 brought back for at least one of the coins. I was in grade school when the design was shown in the coin magazines of the day, and I still remember how disappointed I was when the much less attractive SBA was chosen instead.

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    The_Dinosaur_ManThe_Dinosaur_Man Posts: 837 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Mintmarks, put more in circulation than just the P & D.

    Custom album maker and numismatic photographer, see my portfolio here: (http://www.donahuenumismatics.com/).

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    CasabrownCasabrown Posts: 2,126 ✭✭✭

    Here are my responses to the last three comments:

    As much as it is understandable that very little of our society is without some political implications, let's place the focus on the most attractive designs recognizing the legacy of the nation's past, relevancy to the present, and representing the hope of the future.

    Which denomination are you suggesting for the Gasparro Liberty design?

    Please clarify comments about the mintmarks.

    Thanks

    Casabrown

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    DrDarrylDrDarryl Posts: 585 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Bill was introduced in both the house and senate. Has not moved from "introduced" since 2021. Read these bills to see the denominations, mintage and which metals.

    https://congress.gov/bill/117th-congress/house-bill/4429/text

    https://congress.gov/bill/117th-congress/senate-bill/2384/text?r=44&s=1

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    CasabrownCasabrown Posts: 2,126 ✭✭✭

    Congress has passed the law and the President has signed the law. Thus, the next steps are to provide designs congruent with the law. This is the reason for this post as the law provides substantial latitude. This is a once in a lifetime opportunity for collectors and the public

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    CasabrownCasabrown Posts: 2,126 ✭✭✭

    ttt

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    FlyingAlFlyingAl Posts: 2,850 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Casabrown said:
    Congress has passed the law and the President has signed the law. Thus, the next steps are to provide designs congruent with the law. This is the reason for this post as the law provides substantial latitude. This is a once in a lifetime opportunity for collectors and the public

    Again, I don’t think there’s a better option to celebrate the heritage of the country than bringing back old designs from the 1870s. It won’t require timely contests either for new designs.

    Young Numismatist, Coin Photographer.

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    BStrauss3BStrauss3 Posts: 3,163 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Bring back one design from each period

    • Flying Eagle Cent
    • Buffalo Nickel - raised ground design
    • Mercury Dime
    • Seated Liberty quarter
    -----Burton
    ANA 50 year/Life Member (now "Emeritus")
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    CasabrownCasabrown Posts: 2,126 ✭✭✭

    Very interesting. Please also provide your comments to the US mint at www.usmint.gov or the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee at info@ccac.gov.

    Let's keep the ideas coming.

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    SwampboySwampboy Posts: 12,886 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 28, 2022 11:11AM

    ....

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    BStrauss3BStrauss3 Posts: 3,163 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Sorry @Swampboy after the semisesqu. coins the programs resume with sports played by youth. With no end date in the legislation.

    I got through baseball, softball, stickball (NYC), Football, Soccer, and Basketball, then I started running out of ideas. Well - Madden, FIFA, Minecraft, Roblox, WoW, et al...

    -----Burton
    ANA 50 year/Life Member (now "Emeritus")
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    SwampboySwampboy Posts: 12,886 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 28, 2022 11:11AM

    ....

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    olympicsosolympicsos Posts: 697 ✭✭✭✭

    @BStrauss3 said:
    Sorry @Swampboy after the semisesqu. coins the programs resume with sports played by youth. With no end date in the legislation.

    I got through baseball, softball, stickball (NYC), Football, Soccer, and Basketball, then I started running out of ideas. Well - Madden, FIFA, Minecraft, Roblox, WoW, et al...

    I don't know how Eliasberg can have a complete set of coins today.

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    BStrauss3BStrauss3 Posts: 3,163 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I don't know how Eliasberg can have a complete set of coins today.

    @olympicsos it's easy - he goes to the bank and buys a box of each denomination and does CRH.

    https://www.congress.gov/bill/116th-congress/house-bill/1923

    (Sec. 2) This bill requires the Department of the Treasury to issue, beginning January 1, 2022, quarter-dollar coins in commemoration of the accomplishments and contributions of up to five prominent American women per year.

    (Sec. 3) Treasury may issue quarter dollars, beginning January 1, 2026, with up to five different designs emblematic of the U.S. semiquincentennial. One of the quarter dollar designs must be emblematic of a woman's or women's contribution to the birth of the nation or the Declaration of Independence or any other monumental moments in American history. Treasury may, in addition to the coins honoring Native Americans and honoring innovation and innovators, mint for issuance during the one-year period beginning January 1, 2026, $1 dollar coins with designs emblematic of the U.S. semiquincentennial.

    (Sec. 4) Beginning January 1, 2027, Treasury shall issue quarter dollars that have designs on the reverse that are emblematic of sports played by American youth. Up to five different sports designs shall be issued each year. Beginning January 1, 2027, Treasury shall issue half dollars that have designs on the reverse that are emblematic of a sport tailored to athletes with a range of disabilities, including physical impairment, vision impairment and intellectual impairment (i.e., a Paralympic sport).

    The half dollar coins bearing such designs shall be issued at the rate of one new design during each year of the period of issuance. For every design of a coin honoring a sport issued under this bill, Treasury is authorized to design and issue one or more accompanying medals with designs emblematic of the sport honored with the issuance of the coin, and include a surcharge on the sale of the medals sold. Treasury may design and manufacture medals for award at the 2028 Olympic Games in Los Angeles, California, and may provide the medals for the 2028 Paralympic Games in Los Angeles to the U.S. Olympic & Paralympic Committee.

    (Sec. 5) Treasury is authorized to strike and make available for sale such number of bullion coins as it deems appropriate that feature the designs of all the quarter dollars and half dollars issued under this bill.

    (Sec. 6) No head and shoulders portrait or bust of any person, living or dead, and no portrait of a living person may be included in the design on the reverse of specified coins. Treasury may develop and execute a marketing, advertising, promotional, and educational program to promote the collecting of all the coins and medals authorized by this bill.

    (Sec. 7) This section provides that the budgetary effects of this bill for purposes of complying with the Statutory Pay-As-You-Go Act shall be determined by reference to the latest statement titled Budgetary Effects of PAYGO Legislation.

    (Sec. 8) This section provides that no coin or medal minted and issued under this bill may be sold at a price that would result in a net cost to the federal government.

    -----Burton
    ANA 50 year/Life Member (now "Emeritus")
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    dunkleosteus430dunkleosteus430 Posts: 471 ✭✭✭✭

    Kind of like what @FlyingAl was saying, I think that bringing back older designs would be cool. I just pictured a chain cent on a modern cent planchet - seems cool, but, like back in its day, it might not be received well. Maybe they could put the Fugio/Continental Currency designs on some coins.
    I also liked @BStrauss3 's idea, with a coin from each time period. That's a nice way of showing the nation's progression.

    Young Numismatist

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    CasabrownCasabrown Posts: 2,126 ✭✭✭

    I love the energy. Keep the comments/suggestions coming!

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    Namvet69Namvet69 Posts: 8,672 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The seated Liberty and the flowing hair designs should be used. IMO. Peace Roy

    BST: endeavor1967, synchr, kliao, Outhaul, Donttellthewife, U1Chicago, ajaan, mCarney1173, SurfinHi, MWallace, Sandman70gt, mustanggt, Pittstate03, Lazybones, Walkerguy21D, coinandcurrency242 , thebigeng, Collectorcoins, JimTyler, USMarine6, Elkevvo, Coll3ctor, Yorkshireman, CUKevin, ranshdow, CoinHunter4, bennybravo, Centsearcher, braddick, Windycity, ZoidMeister, mirabela, JJM, RichURich, Bullsitter, jmski52, LukeMarshall

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    CasabrownCasabrown Posts: 2,126 ✭✭✭

    Quite interesting. Please also provide your comments to the US mint at www.usmint.gov or the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee at info@ccac.gov.

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    telephoto1telephoto1 Posts: 4,746 ✭✭✭✭✭

    All I know is that these new designs, once released into circulation will just lead to us getting inundated with calls wondering if they're rare and asking if and/or when they will be worth a lot of money, like they do now about the American women quarters. Heck, I still get them regularly about the circulating Bicentennial crapola. So part of me dreads their release tbh.


    RIP Mom- 1932-2012
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    CasabrownCasabrown Posts: 2,126 ✭✭✭

    I appreciate your concerns. However, perhaps your experience is based upon the role you have in our hobby. From my understanding, there are at least three (sometimes distinct and sometimes overlapping) perspectives. There are the investors, the dealers, and the collectors.

    In the interest of full transparency, I am a collector of modern circulating and commemorative coins. In this regard, I enjoy talking with whomever is willing to listen about coins of the US. The American Women Quarters gave me another opportunity to do so. Yes, I do receive questions about value and quality...and I use these as another opportunity to inform (and sometimes educate) others about the processes for the decisions and the minting of circulating and commemorative coins. Another dividend is that it may result in persons improving their understanding of American history. While I am not naive to believe that the majority of Americans are well acquainted with the historical significance of circulating coins (as most may only view coins from their role in commerce), teaching opportunities, in my humble opinion, should be leveraged whenever they present themselves.

    Thus, I believe that changing the designs of circulating coins in celebration of the 250th Anniversary of our nation's, will represent many more teachable moments beyond some of the self-serving queries that may come from some.

    This is just my two cents. Please continue to share your thoughts about interesting designs you would like to see.

    Casabrown

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    AtcarrollAtcarroll Posts: 343 ✭✭✭

    @BStrauss3 said:

    I don't know how Eliasberg can have a complete set of coins today.

    @olympicsos it's easy - he goes to the bank and buys a box of each denomination and does CRH.

    https://www.congress.gov/bill/116th-congress/house-bill/1923

    (Sec. 2) This bill requires the Department of the Treasury to issue, beginning January 1, 2022, quarter-dollar coins in commemoration of the accomplishments and contributions of up to five prominent American women per year.

    (Sec. 3) Treasury may issue quarter dollars, beginning January 1, 2026, with up to five different designs emblematic of the U.S. semiquincentennial. One of the quarter dollar designs must be emblematic of a woman's or women's contribution to the birth of the nation or the Declaration of Independence or any other monumental moments in American history. Treasury may, in addition to the coins honoring Native Americans and honoring innovation and innovators, mint for issuance during the one-year period beginning January 1, 2026, $1 dollar coins with designs emblematic of the U.S. semiquincentennial.

    (Sec. 4) Beginning January 1, 2027, Treasury shall issue quarter dollars that have designs on the reverse that are emblematic of sports played by American youth. Up to five different sports designs shall be issued each year. Beginning January 1, 2027, Treasury shall issue half dollars that have designs on the reverse that are emblematic of a sport tailored to athletes with a range of disabilities, including physical impairment, vision impairment and intellectual impairment (i.e., a Paralympic sport).

    The half dollar coins bearing such designs shall be issued at the rate of one new design during each year of the period of issuance. For every design of a coin honoring a sport issued under this bill, Treasury is authorized to design and issue one or more accompanying medals with designs emblematic of the sport honored with the issuance of the coin, and include a surcharge on the sale of the medals sold. Treasury may design and manufacture medals for award at the 2028 Olympic Games in Los Angeles, California, and may provide the medals for the 2028 Paralympic Games in Los Angeles to the U.S. Olympic & Paralympic Committee.

    (Sec. 5) Treasury is authorized to strike and make available for sale such number of bullion coins as it deems appropriate that feature the designs of all the quarter dollars and half dollars issued under this bill.

    (Sec. 6) No head and shoulders portrait or bust of any person, living or dead, and no portrait of a living person may be included in the design on the reverse of specified coins. Treasury may develop and execute a marketing, advertising, promotional, and educational program to promote the collecting of all the coins and medals authorized by this bill.

    (Sec. 7) This section provides that the budgetary effects of this bill for purposes of complying with the Statutory Pay-As-You-Go Act shall be determined by reference to the latest statement titled Budgetary Effects of PAYGO Legislation.

    (Sec. 8) This section provides that no coin or medal minted and issued under this bill may be sold at a price that would result in a net cost to the federal government.

    The only problem I can see is sec.3, where it says "may issue" instead of "shall issue". It gives permission but doesn't make it a requirement.

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    COCollectorCOCollector Posts: 1,295 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 30, 2022 5:37PM

    Perfect time for an all-new half-dollar design in 2026.

    Worst case, if there are serious problems with the new design, dismiss it as a one-year commemorative -- and resume Kennedy production for 2027.

    And PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE don't clutter it with a committee's worth of design elements. Keep it simple.

    Successful BST transactions with forum members thebigeng, SPalladino, Zoidmeister, coin22lover, coinsarefun, jwitten, CommemKing.

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    GiveMeProofGiveMeProof Posts: 564 ✭✭✭✭

    a $2.50 coin? I guess because of it being the semiquincentennial, 250 years?

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    CasabrownCasabrown Posts: 2,126 ✭✭✭

    very interesting comments.

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    CasabrownCasabrown Posts: 2,126 ✭✭✭

    ttt

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    CasabrownCasabrown Posts: 2,126 ✭✭✭

    ttt

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    BStrauss3BStrauss3 Posts: 3,163 ✭✭✭✭✭

    How about a design with an American soldier in buckskin with an AR-15 hiding behind a tree plinking away at the British redcoats?

    -----Burton
    ANA 50 year/Life Member (now "Emeritus")
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    CasabrownCasabrown Posts: 2,126 ✭✭✭

    Very interesting.

    As a reminder, here is a copy of my first paragraph:

    What do you think about this from the prospects of increasing the awareness of the general public and of increasing the interests of collectors? What designs in your mind best represent America's pride of its past, appreciation of the present, and embrace of hope for its future?

    Let's think about what ideas of designs embrace the last sentence and who they might interest the public and collectors.

    Best regards,

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    DrDarrylDrDarryl Posts: 585 ✭✭✭✭✭

    It's just a bill (coins in commemoration of the semiquincentennial anniversary of the establishment of the United States).

    Not signed into law as of 12/17/2022. Still in the "Introduced" stage. See both trackers.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OgVKvqTItto

    Bill does mention consultation on the design. One must Influence the mentioned groups for their design input, review by the CCAC, and final selection by the Secretary of the Treasury.

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    DrDarrylDrDarryl Posts: 585 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited December 17, 2022 12:25PM

    The America 250 website:

    https://america250.org/

    The members on the commission https://america250.org/about/leadership/commission/

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    ernie11ernie11 Posts: 1,908 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @DrDarryl said:
    It's just a bill (coins in commemoration of the semiquincentennial anniversary of the establishment of the United States).

    Not signed into law as of 12/17/2022. Still in the "Introduced" stage. See both trackers.

    Bill does mention consultation on the design. One must Influence the mentioned groups for their design input, review by the CCAC, and final selection by the Secretary of the Treasury.

    I'm not sure what effect the convening of a new Congress has on existing bills, I just know that the Senate sponsor, Patrick Toomey, leaves office on January 3, just 17 days from now.

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    CasabrownCasabrown Posts: 2,126 ✭✭✭

    Folks,

    This already the law of the land. Authorizing legislation passed and was signed into law in 2020: The Circulating Collectible Coin Redesign Act of 2020/ Public Law 116-330.

    Read section # 3:

    SEC. 3. ISSUANCE OF REDESIGNED CIRCULATING COINS EMBLEMATIC
    OF THE UNITED STATES SEMIQUINCENTENNIAL.
    Section 5112 of title 31, United States Code, is amended by
    adding at the end the following new subsection:
    ‘‘(y) REDESIGN AND ISSUANCE OF COINS EMBLEMATIC OF THE
    UNITED STATES SEMIQUINCENTENNIAL.— ‘‘(1) REDESIGN BEGINNING IN 2026.— ‘‘(A) IN GENERAL.—
    ‘‘(i) Notwithstanding the 4th, 5th, and 6th sentences of subsection (d)(1), the Secretary may change
    the design on any of the coins authorized under this
    section and minted for issuance during the one-year
    H. R. 1923—3
    period beginning January 1, 2026, in celebration of
    the United States semiquincentennial.
    ‘‘(ii) Notwithstanding the 2nd and 3rd sentences
    of subsection (d)(1), the Secretary may place the
    required inscriptions on either the obverse or reverse
    sides of the coins authorized for redesign under this
    subsection.
    ‘‘(B) QUARTER DOLLARS.—The Secretary may issue
    quarter dollars in 2026 with up to five different designs
    emblematic of the United States semiquincentennial. One
    of the quarter dollar designs must be emblematic of a
    woman’s or women’s contribution to the birth of the Nation
    or the Declaration of Independence or any other monumental moments in American History.
    ‘‘(C) DOLLARS.—The Secretary may, in addition to the
    coins produced under subsections (r) and (w), mint for
    issuance during the one-year period beginning January
    1, 2026, $1 dollar coins with designs emblematic of the
    United States semiquincentennial.
    ‘‘(D) DESIGNS AFTER END OF THE PROGRAM.—Beginning
    in 2027, any coin redesigned under this subsection shall
    revert to the immediately previous designs, with the exception of the quarter dollar and the half dollar, which shall
    bear designs in accordance with subsection (z).
    ‘‘(E) REDESIGN DEFINITION.—A redesign authorized
    under this subsection shall not constitute a ‘change’ for
    purposes of subsection (d)(2).
    ‘‘(2) SELECTION OF DESIGNS.—
    ‘‘(A) IN GENERAL.—Each of the designs authorized
    under this subsection shall be selected by the Secretary
    after consultation with Commission of Fine Arts and review
    by the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee.
    ‘‘(B) DESIGN SELECTION PROCESS.—Designs shall be
    developed and selected in accordance with the design selection process developed by the Secretary in consultation
    with the United States Semiquincentennial Commission
    and with recommendations from the general public.’’.

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    BStrauss3BStrauss3 Posts: 3,163 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @DrDarryl is wrong, there was another bill that was signed into law in 2020.

    @ernie11 - once Congress adjourns, everything is dead.

    I'm not sure what effect the convening of a new Congress has on existing bills, I just know that the Senate sponsor, Patrick Toomey, leaves office on January 3, just 17 days from now.

    There is an argument that bills sent to the president before congress adjourns are still alive for 10 days, in fact, the 2020 coinage act was signed into law after the adjournment date.

    -----Burton
    ANA 50 year/Life Member (now "Emeritus")
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    CasabrownCasabrown Posts: 2,126 ✭✭✭

    Correct and in my post very early today, I included the law, The Circulating Collectible Coin Redesign Act of 2020/ Public Law 116-330. and its provisions.

    So let's return to thinking about some interesting designs that celebrate America's pride of its past, appreciation of the present, and embrace of hope for its future.

    Casabrown

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    CasabrownCasabrown Posts: 2,126 ✭✭✭

    ttt

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