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Questions about this photo of a normal 1996 quarter from a roll.

FrazFraz Posts: 2,101 ✭✭✭✭✭
edited October 27, 2022 4:24AM in U.S. Coin Forum

iPad Pro camera—Macro Mode app

In the pics of of the obverse I tried to show:
a) the small scratches in the fields, and
b) the luster and the early toning (I reckon that is what it is).
c) the general condition.

d) if I were to ask you to grade it how much do the photos help you?
e) If quarters fall within your range of coins that you pick, would you save it?
f) Who would keep it in a container?
g) Who would preserve it in a flip?
It doesn’t rate an Airtite.

I regret that I question you so much.

n00b version: I found this coin in a cardboard jewelers box with silver cufflinks, earrings, and tie tacks and bars. How much silver is in it and what temperature to I have to raise it to to get the pure silver out? If it is worth a lot should I not melt it and send it to NGC for grading?

Comments

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    MasonGMasonG Posts: 6,261 ✭✭✭✭✭

    There is no silver in it. Highly doubtful that it is worth more than 25 cents.

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    Mr_SpudMr_Spud Posts: 4,682 ✭✭✭✭✭

    That’s one you would spend

    Mr_Spud

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    FrazFraz Posts: 2,101 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited October 27, 2022 4:35AM

    Funny, you guys read the n00b version.
    I notice that folk here read the last part of my posts, missing my inquiries, even the title. I set this one up to prove it.
    Thanks guys, if you tell me it’s good enough to put in a display, should I put it in a Dansco album or a Harris folder?
    What a hoot.

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    JBKJBK Posts: 15,020 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Fraz said:
    Funny, you guys read the n00b version.
    I notice that folk here read the last part of my posts, missing my inquiries, even the title. I set this one up to prove it.
    Thanks guys, if you tell me it’s good enough to put in a display, should I put it in a Dansco album or a Harris folder?
    What a hoot.

    I read the whole thing and it was a little difficult to figure out the post. Now I know that you were just testing us. :/

    It's a normal quarter. If you collect modern circulated coins then save it. But it's worth 25 cents so use the least expensive folder available.

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    FrazFraz Posts: 2,101 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited October 27, 2022 4:38AM

    My questions are about the the quality of photo, @JBK —Thanks for trying to read it. I thought that the title made it clear that It’s only a quarter and that I was asking about the photo.

    I should have said,”Is this photo good enough for you guys to give an opinion on line?”

    My second question was, “what would a collector of quarters do with it, preserve, store, or spend?

    That crap about melting silver and Dansco vs. Harris was for you guys who don’t read, however sarcasm is low humor and a poor method of communication, my bad.

    I’ll figure it out.

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    jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 32,687 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Fraz said:
    My questions are about the the quality of photo, @JBK —Thanks for trying to read it. I thought that the title made it clear that It’s only a quarter and that I was asking about the photo.

    I should have said,”Is this photo good enough for you guys to give an opinion on line?”

    My second question was, “what would a collector of quarters do with it, preserve, store, or spend?

    That crap about melting silver and Dansco vs. Harris was for you guys who don’t read, however sarcasm is low humor and a poor method of communication, my bad.

    I’ll figure it out.

    How could we know if the photo is "good enough" if we don't know what the coin looks like in hand? The quarter looks XF, is it?

    I have 3 atm of nitrogen gas in an otherwise evacuated 2 L flask at 300 K. I add 2 atm of hydrogen gas to the same flask. The equilibrium constant for the production of ammonia is 3x10^-2 at 300 K. What is the total pressure in the flask once equilibrium has been established?

    As soon as you have correctly answered the question, I'll address your other questions.

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    jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 32,687 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I would definitely "melt it and send it to NGC", that should confuse them.

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    FrazFraz Posts: 2,101 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited October 27, 2022 5:08AM

    @jmlanzaf said:
    I would definitely "melt it and send it to NGC", that should confuse them.

    That’s what I do.

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    rickoricko Posts: 98,724 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Fraz....The pictures seem to be of good quality. You have the coin, what is your opinion of the picture vs. the coin in hand?? Cheers, RickO

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    FrazFraz Posts: 2,101 ✭✭✭✭✭

    My sincere thanks for your time, @jmlanzaf.

    @jmlanzaf said:

    How could we know if the photo is "good enough" if we don't know what the coin looks like in hand? The quarter looks XF, is it?

    Why do we post photos, then? I tried to capture what I think is subtle toning and a clear field with lots of tiny scratches with some luster remaining. Should I include descriptive text of a piece with the pic if I have a question?
    I’m a sorter, don’t presume that I can grade. I chose a nondescript coin that I find prettier than the average.

    I have 3 atm of nitrogen gas in an otherwise evacuated 2 L flask at 300 K. I add 2 atm of hydrogen gas to the same flask. The equilibrium constant for the production of ammonia is 3x10^-2 at 300 K. What is the total pressure in the flask once equilibrium has been established?

    As soon as you have correctly answered the question, I'll address your other questions.

    Welcome to the forum. Your example is not exceptional. Nitrogen is the most common gas in the atmosphere. You can buy ammonia cheaply at CVS. The flask you use is inappropriate for testing total pressure and will implode if you decrease the pressure. A tip: wear safety glasses, wash your hands and wipe the prints from the beaker before you shoot pics.

    Disclaimer: the last paragraph is parody of the typical reply to the typical newbie question.

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    FrazFraz Posts: 2,101 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @ricko said:
    @Fraz....The pictures seem to be of good quality. You have the coin, what is your opinion of the picture vs. the coin in hand?? Cheers, RickO

    Thank you, @ricko—It has taken me two months of practice to have the confidence to post macros photos.
    The pic that shows the luster is close, I believe. The toning is subtle, some luster remains.

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    cladkingcladking Posts: 28,445 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The Philly coin is fairly typical for the date and lies at about the 80th %ile in terms of condition. The little scratches have become typical for almost all the quarters in circulation over the last 15 years. I don't know who is doing them.

    It looks like an AU-50 but I'd grade it only XF because of the scratching.

    Finding these in nice AU without the scratches has become quite a challenge but I think I'd keep looking.

    You might just plug it in a folder until a nicer one comes along.

    Tempus fugit.
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    FrazFraz Posts: 2,101 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited October 27, 2022 6:56AM

    Null—the post to which I replied disappeared

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    Mr_SpudMr_Spud Posts: 4,682 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The real question is, what are you planning to do to that coin with the sulphuric acid?😉

    Mr_Spud

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    FrazFraz Posts: 2,101 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited October 27, 2022 10:06AM

    A little scalding will bring out that toning a bit.

    Edited to say “just kidding.”

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    jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 32,687 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Fraz said:
    My sincere thanks for your time, @jmlanzaf.

    @jmlanzaf said:

    How could we know if the photo is "good enough" if we don't know what the coin looks like in hand? The quarter looks XF, is it?

    Why do we post photos, then? I tried to capture what I think is subtle toning and a clear field with lots of tiny scratches with some luster remaining. Should I include descriptive text of a piece with the pic if I have a question?
    I’m a sorter, don’t presume that I can grade. I chose a nondescript coin that I find prettier than the average.

    I have 3 atm of nitrogen gas in an otherwise evacuated 2 L flask at 300 K. I add 2 atm of hydrogen gas to the same flask. The equilibrium constant for the production of ammonia is 3x10^-2 at 300 K. What is the total pressure in the flask once equilibrium has been established?

    As soon as you have correctly answered the question, I'll address your other questions.

    Welcome to the forum. Your example is not exceptional. Nitrogen is the most common gas in the atmosphere. You can buy ammonia cheaply at CVS. The flask you use is inappropriate for testing total pressure and will implode if you decrease the pressure. A tip: wear safety glasses, wash your hands and wipe the prints from the beaker before you shoot pics.

    Disclaimer: the last paragraph is parody of the typical reply to the typical newbie question.

    The person who posts the photos presumably believes they are representative of the coin. Even then, I'm a firm believer that definitively grading from photos are impossible. However, you didn't ask for a grade, you asked if the photos help. There's the snarky answer and the legitimate answer. Snarky: No, it would be easier to grade the coin without a photo. But then you asked if the photo is "good enough" to which I replied and continue to reply - snarkless - "only you know if the photo is representative of the coin".

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    JBKJBK Posts: 15,020 ✭✭✭✭✭

    My pictures stink, so they're better than mine. But not as good as some others'.

    Good enough to identify an error vs post mint damage, for example, but probably not good enough to split hairs in the MS grades, for example.

    And now I'm trying to figure out what the glass container says. :D
    (Is that the sulphuric acid another poster alluded to?).

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    FrazFraz Posts: 2,101 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @JBK said:

    And now I'm trying to figure out what the glass container says. :D
    (Is that the sulphuric acid another poster alluded to?).

    That’s what I need to know. I’ve shamed myself enough with text; I don’t want photos that I post to add embarrassment.

    I did not find snark in your answer, @jmlanzaf —it was an honest answer.

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    OldhoopsterOldhoopster Posts: 2,930 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Fraz said:

    I have 3 atm of nitrogen gas in an otherwise evacuated 2 L flask at 300 K. I add 2 atm of hydrogen gas to the same flask. The equilibrium constant for the production of ammonia is 3x10^-2 at 300 K. What is the total pressure in the flask once equilibrium has been established?

    As soon as you have correctly answered the question, I'll address your other questions.

    Welcome to the forum. Your example is not exceptional. Nitrogen is the most common gas in the atmosphere. You can buy ammonia cheaply at CVS. The flask you use is inappropriate for testing total pressure and will implode if you decrease the pressure. A tip: wear safety glasses, wash your hands and wipe the prints from the beaker before you shoot pics.

    Disclaimer: the last paragraph is parody of the typical reply to the typical newbie question.

    Congratulations. You received an F in freshman chemistry. Sign up to retake the course next semester.

    Member of the ANA since 1982
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    FrazFraz Posts: 2,101 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited October 27, 2022 12:51PM

    Thrice? Durn, I ‘m never gonna get the silver out of that quarter.

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