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1905 dated Coins-All CAC

Eldorado9Eldorado9 Posts: 2,106 ✭✭✭✭✭

In 1905 the average annual wage was $500.00, and Americans owned less than 1 car for every 1000 people. My how things have changed.

Notes on the coins: The proofs are from an original set. The 1905-s half is the Eliasberg example, has semi proof like fields, and is one of my favorite half dollars of all time. Post your 1905's

PF-66+ RB

PF-66

PF-66

MS-66

PF-66

MS-67 Eliasberg

PF-66

MS-67

Comments

  • rickoricko Posts: 98,724 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Eldorado9... Great coins... the IHC and the gold are amazing....All are top notch quality. Off hand, I do not recall a1905 coin in my collection. Cheers, RickO

  • Dave99BDave99B Posts: 8,353 ✭✭✭✭✭

    OMG, these are all just fantastic! What a cool set. The Proof 05-P quarter is just short of mesmerizing!

    ME LIKE

    Dave

    Always looking for original, better date VF20-VF35 Barber quarters and halves, and a quality beer.
  • FloridafacelifterFloridafacelifter Posts: 1,153 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Niiiice!! 1905 is not a year I have, but I sure do like yours!

  • LanceNewmanOCCLanceNewmanOCC Posts: 19,999 ✭✭✭✭✭

    LOVE :heart: those wild toners!

    it can't really be common (don't know if you care or not) to have a barber proof dime with a re-punched digit/date.

    <--- look what's behind the mask! - cool link 1/NO ~ 2/NNP ~ 3/NNC ~ 4/CF ~ 5/PG ~ 6/Cert ~ 7/NGC 7a/NGC pop~ 8/NGCF ~ 9/HA archives ~ 10/PM ~ 11/NM ~ 12/ANACS cert ~ 13/ANACS pop - report fakes 1/ACEF ~ report fakes/thefts 1/NCIS - Numi-Classes SS ~ Bass ~ Transcribed Docs NNP - clashed coins - error training - V V mm styles -

  • Glen2022Glen2022 Posts: 843 ✭✭✭✭

    Beautiful. I really like the early proofs. The IHC is stunning.

  • Eldorado9Eldorado9 Posts: 2,106 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @LanceNewmanOCC said:
    LOVE :heart: those wild toners!

    it can't really be common (don't know if you care or not) to have a barber proof dime with a re-punched digit/date.

    Hey Lance, are you referring to repunching on the 5? I might also see a trace on the 0 as well. What do you see? Good eye btw!

  • skier07skier07 Posts: 3,680 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Amazing!

  • TomBTomB Posts: 20,724 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Nice freaking coins and that proof set is fortunate that you happened to be the buyer so that it would stay intact for the foreseeable future.

    Thomas Bush Numismatics & Numismatic Photography

    In honor of the memory of Cpl. Michael E. Thompson

    image
  • LanceNewmanOCCLanceNewmanOCC Posts: 19,999 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Eldorado9 said:

    @LanceNewmanOCC said:
    LOVE :heart: those wild toners!

    it can't really be common (don't know if you care or not) to have a barber proof dime with a re-punched digit/date.

    Hey Lance, are you referring to repunching on the 5? I might also see a trace on the 0 as well. What do you see? Good eye btw!

    .
    .

    thanks.

    you have any plans to make a wild/pretty toned1905 proof type set?

    i found the coin in CF, so i could get the MAX resolution which the cert pages no longer offer and i've seen not been able to find a way to modify the link to get max images.

    cert image link - https://d1htnxwo4o0jhw.cloudfront.net/cert/82114558/1506278.jpg

    cf max image link - https://images.pcgs.com/CoinFacts/33516113_1506293_MAX.jpg - (change max to several other sizes)

    in this instance (maybe many others) the cert image IS also the same as the CF max image.

    i was looking for the clearest image to blow up for the date.

    one of these days someone is gonna take the lead on the barber series to get most of this stuff all listed under some new numbering system...

    fwiw, someone can just copy some image or part of an image and paste directly into this chat box (windows) w/o even having to save an example on their desktop or whatever. ;)

    <--- look what's behind the mask! - cool link 1/NO ~ 2/NNP ~ 3/NNC ~ 4/CF ~ 5/PG ~ 6/Cert ~ 7/NGC 7a/NGC pop~ 8/NGCF ~ 9/HA archives ~ 10/PM ~ 11/NM ~ 12/ANACS cert ~ 13/ANACS pop - report fakes 1/ACEF ~ report fakes/thefts 1/NCIS - Numi-Classes SS ~ Bass ~ Transcribed Docs NNP - clashed coins - error training - V V mm styles -

  • Eldorado9Eldorado9 Posts: 2,106 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @LanceNewmanOCC Fantastic! I never noticed the repunching until you showed me. It's little details like this that make the hobby so fun. Thank you for pointing it out buddy! That Max image really is pretty....

  • ashelandasheland Posts: 22,673 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Excellent coins!
    To my knowledge, I don’t own any coin from 1905, however I believe this piece of Martele was made in 1905 in fact I think it was March:

  • erwindocerwindoc Posts: 4,927 ✭✭✭✭✭

    These are my only 1905's...

    MS65 CAC

    MS61 CAC

  • LanceNewmanOCCLanceNewmanOCC Posts: 19,999 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Eldorado9 said:
    **In 1905 the average annual wage was $500.00, and Americans owned less than 1 car for every 1000 people. My how things have changed. **

    Notes on the coins: The proofs are from an original set. The 1905-s half is the Eliasberg example, has semi proof like fields, and is one of my favorite half dollars of all time. Post your 1905's

    JUST to take the next step to think about the odds of the average person being able to "set back" some random cool pocket change from time to time. $500 a year (if they don't work sundays) is around $1.50 a day.

    so if a person WAS into coins and was able to survive the many ways to die during that time period and then keep a nice little collection (wwi and the depression are right around the corner with the country i'm sure, still, feeling the effects of the civil war), putting back 1 coin a week would have been technically doable, even contacting the mint for prime examples which seemed to be a thing which i find EXTREMELY fascinating to have been able to do that, even if it took a week or two.

    JUST to even be able to have enough money to set back 1 quarter every week or two, probably wouldn't have been feasable and that is at FACE value. ouch maybe a nickel now n then or just 1 nice coin a month. KINDA like some do these days really since they are valued so much higher now.

    so if you think about it, there were A LOT of coins produced by 1905 and since the average person wouldn't have been able to collect regularly, that means that those that did, had FAR more than todays averages. who was holding all these proof coins, all the double eagles etc. banks across the country probably picked up a lot of slack. museums weren't really a think yet and there weren't many universities i bet, not like today i mean.

    the low quantity of "dealers" must've had some outrageous inventories.

    <--- look what's behind the mask! - cool link 1/NO ~ 2/NNP ~ 3/NNC ~ 4/CF ~ 5/PG ~ 6/Cert ~ 7/NGC 7a/NGC pop~ 8/NGCF ~ 9/HA archives ~ 10/PM ~ 11/NM ~ 12/ANACS cert ~ 13/ANACS pop - report fakes 1/ACEF ~ report fakes/thefts 1/NCIS - Numi-Classes SS ~ Bass ~ Transcribed Docs NNP - clashed coins - error training - V V mm styles -

  • Eldorado9Eldorado9 Posts: 2,106 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @LanceNewmanOCC said:

    @Eldorado9 said:
    **In 1905 the average annual wage was $500.00, and Americans owned less than 1 car for every 1000 people. My how things have changed. **

    Notes on the coins: The proofs are from an original set. The 1905-s half is the Eliasberg example, has semi proof like fields, and is one of my favorite half dollars of all time. Post your 1905's

    JUST to take the next step to think about the odds of the average person being able to "set back" some random cool pocket change from time to time. $500 a year (if they don't work sundays) is around $1.50 a day.

    so if a person WAS into coins and was able to survive the many ways to die during that time period and then keep a nice little collection (wwi and the depression are right around the corner with the country i'm sure, still, feeling the effects of the civil war), putting back 1 coin a week would have been technically doable, even contacting the mint for prime examples which seemed to be a thing which i find EXTREMELY fascinating to have been able to do that, even if it took a week or two.

    JUST to even be able to have enough money to set back 1 quarter every week or two, probably wouldn't have been feasable and that is at FACE value. ouch maybe a nickel now n then or just 1 nice coin a month. KINDA like some do these days really since they are valued so much higher now.

    so if you think about it, there were A LOT of coins produced by 1905 and since the average person wouldn't have been able to collect regularly, that means that those that did, had FAR more than todays averages. who was holding all these proof coins, all the double eagles etc. banks across the country probably picked up a lot of slack. museums weren't really a think yet and there weren't many universities i bet, not like today i mean.

    the low quantity of "dealers" must've had some outrageous inventories.

    Yes, great points, and it all makes sense when you look at populations of mint state Barber's from that period. They simply were not saved at all....except a handful of collectors, Clapp, Emory and the like. Take the 1905-o quarter for instance: 1,230,000 were minted yet only about 23 coins exist in MS-65 and above grades (at PCGS) Talk about low survivorship! Equates to .000018 percent!

  • LanceNewmanOCCLanceNewmanOCC Posts: 19,999 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Eldorado9 said:
    Yes, great points, and it all makes sense when you look at populations of mint state Barber's from that period. They simply were not saved at all....except a handful of collectors, Clapp, Emory and the like. Take the 1905-o quarter for instance: 1,230,000 were minted yet only about 23 coins exist in MS-65 and above grades (at PCGS) Talk about low survivorship! Equates to .000018 percent!

    have you read/heard any substantial commentary about what would have happened (possibly) to the economic well-being of the USA if more people had been able to keep more mint state/au coins and done so?

    the stuff was made to work, not to store.

    i'm guessing from the numbers minted, there was probably more than enough for tens of thousands of mid-level to serious collectors having at least full sets of most circulating coins of their time by just pulling stuff from circulation/rolls.

    interesting comment about your eliasberg half with the reflective fields. interesting to see they essentially ignored the roller marks, as they kinda do mint adjustment marks, unless in your estimation, those hold the coin back from an even loftier grade?

    <--- look what's behind the mask! - cool link 1/NO ~ 2/NNP ~ 3/NNC ~ 4/CF ~ 5/PG ~ 6/Cert ~ 7/NGC 7a/NGC pop~ 8/NGCF ~ 9/HA archives ~ 10/PM ~ 11/NM ~ 12/ANACS cert ~ 13/ANACS pop - report fakes 1/ACEF ~ report fakes/thefts 1/NCIS - Numi-Classes SS ~ Bass ~ Transcribed Docs NNP - clashed coins - error training - V V mm styles -

  • Eldorado9Eldorado9 Posts: 2,106 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @LanceNewmanOCC said:

    @Eldorado9 said:
    Yes, great points, and it all makes sense when you look at populations of mint state Barber's from that period. They simply were not saved at all....except a handful of collectors, Clapp, Emory and the like. Take the 1905-o quarter for instance: 1,230,000 were minted yet only about 23 coins exist in MS-65 and above grades (at PCGS) Talk about low survivorship! Equates to .000018 percent!

    have you read/heard any substantial commentary about what would have happened (possibly) to the economic well-being of the USA if more people had been able to keep more mint state/au coins and done so?

    the stuff was made to work, not to store.

    i'm guessing from the numbers minted, there was probably more than enough for tens of thousands of mid-level to serious collectors having at least full sets of most circulating coins of their time by just pulling stuff from circulation/rolls.

    interesting comment about your eliasberg half with the reflective fields. interesting to see they essentially ignored the roller marks, as they kinda do mint adjustment marks, unless in your estimation, those hold the coin back from an even loftier grade?

    Now, if you get me talking about that Eliasberg half, I may not stop! The roller marks on the cheek are very light, and in hand, without magnification, you don't see them. What you do see is the most phenomenal Barber Half you've ever laid eyes on and it screams Eliasberg. The luster is unique. It is intensely strong, cartwheeling around yet the PL nature of the surfaces creates a type of luster that you rarely see...It's very unique. The coin completely lacks the kind of nicks and marks you typically see, and one can tell that it was immediately pulled aside once it was made. I think PCGS gives a general pass on roller marks, like adjustment marks, they consider those "as made" but, I could see this coin in 67+ holder. In the end, it's the finest 1905-s in existence regardless of grades and holders. The MS-68 Hansen coin, has some nice color but is clearly over graded, and has obvious/major flaws in the right obverse field.

  • justindanjustindan Posts: 697 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Amazing. I love the dime.

  • FlyingAlFlyingAl Posts: 2,845 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Well, I've tried to pick out my favorite piece from the lot. I've been horribly unsuccessful!

    Each and every one of those coins is fantastic. Stunning!

    Young Numismatist, Coin Photographer.

  • Eldorado9Eldorado9 Posts: 2,106 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Thanks for all the positive comments guys! @FlyingAl glad you can't choose one! That's a good sign!

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