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PCGS Restoration for these 2 coins: Worth it ?

1900 ms64 and 1895 ms64, both pcgs, with some black spots. The 1900 on both sides, and the 1895 a tiny one on the obverse only. Is it worth paying about $150 each for PCGS restoration before selling ? Grade will probably not change. Any expert opinions ?

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    MFeldMFeld Posts: 12,050 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Not in my opinion.

    Mark Feld* of Heritage Auctions*Unless otherwise noted, my posts here represent my personal opinions.

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    @MFeld said:
    Not in my opinion.

    Mark, do you think they can plus with the spots ? The spot on the reverse of the 1900 is actually black (don't know why it shows whitish on the scan).

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    emeraldATVemeraldATV Posts: 4,048 ✭✭✭✭✭

    If that's an option ?
    Start a log for the coin.
    That may come back to bite you.

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    skier07skier07 Posts: 3,689 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @emeraldATV said:
    If that's an option ?
    Start a log for the coin.
    That may come back to bite you.

    +1

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    scotty4449scotty4449 Posts: 684 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @MFeld said:
    Not in my opinion.

    Is this because you don't think they could successfully remove those spots without making the coin just as bad or worse?

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    jesbrokenjesbroken Posts: 9,303 ✭✭✭✭✭

    No way to be sure until you see what the restoration does, obviously if it improves the coin it would be worth it, but any restoration is a gamble. Good luck however you decide.
    Jim


    When a man who is honestly mistaken hears the truth, he will either quit being mistaken or cease to be honest....Abraham Lincoln

    Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it.....Mark Twain
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    @emeraldATV said:
    If that's an option ?
    Start a log for the coin.
    That may come back to bite you.

    " If that's an option ? " : Don't understand your comment, would you please explain. Thx

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    @skier07 said:

    @emeraldATV said:
    If that's an option ?
    Start a log for the coin.
    That may come back to bite you.

    +1

    what is +1 ?

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    yosclimberyosclimber Posts: 4,596 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited September 13, 2022 6:44PM

    Those are not really black spots like we see on copper and nickel.
    More like PVC or debris.
    Could probably remove with an acetone bath.
    But if you find pitting under former PVC, that's not so good.
    And paying the fees is not great, either.

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    MFeldMFeld Posts: 12,050 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @abdelmeg1 said:

    @MFeld said:
    Not in my opinion.

    Mark, do you think they can plus with the spots ? The spot on the reverse of the 1900 is actually black (don't know why it shows whitish on the scan).

    I don’t think it’s likely, and it might not be much, if any more likely, if the coins are conserved.

    Mark Feld* of Heritage Auctions*Unless otherwise noted, my posts here represent my personal opinions.

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    skier07skier07 Posts: 3,689 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @abdelmeg1 said:

    @skier07 said:

    @emeraldATV said:
    If that's an option ?
    Start a log for the coin.
    That may come back to bite you.

    +1

    what is +1 ?

    It’s probably not a good idea to start a thread about conserving a coin that you plan on selling. The above coins are common dates so it probably won’t make a difference.

    +1 = I agree

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    @MFeld said:

    @scotty4449 said:

    @MFeld said:
    Not in my opinion.

    Is this because you don't think they could successfully remove those spots without making the coin just as bad or worse?

    I don’t know if they could or how the coins would end up, if conserved. My thought is that the odds of making up the extra $150 per coin aren’t especially favorable.
    If the coins are going to be sold anyway, I’d sell them as they are, rather than putting more money into them, without knowing how they’ll turn out. I’m not much of a risk-taker.

    Thank you, Mark

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    emeraldATVemeraldATV Posts: 4,048 ✭✭✭✭✭

    My thoughts on restoration ,
    If you have no other options to satisfy your researched thoughts.
    And I reserve the right to change this statement as I learn.
    What ? lol

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    SmudgeSmudge Posts: 9,253 ✭✭✭✭✭

    No, not worth it.

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    TomBTomB Posts: 20,730 ✭✭✭✭✭

    No. In my opinion it is not worth approximately $150 per coin to roll the dice and wait several months to get them back in order to possibly make a small bit more upon resale.

    Thomas Bush Numismatics & Numismatic Photography

    In honor of the memory of Cpl. Michael E. Thompson

    image
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    rickoricko Posts: 98,724 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I would not spend the money on restoration efforts on those coins. Expensive, and unlikely to result in grade improvement. So throwing good money away.... Cheers, RickO

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    PerryHallPerryHall Posts: 45,426 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The copper spot on the 1895 G$20 looks like someone already tried to spot clean it with a Q-tip dipped in coin dip based on the lighter color around the spot.

    Worry is the interest you pay on a debt you may not owe.

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    1madman1madman Posts: 1,291 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Your costs for restoration are $38 per coin (Restoration regular), plus $28 shipping. You’re only gonna pay the 3% guarantee premium if either/both upgrade. So $104 if nothing changes. Well worth the money and you should definitely send them in. Do not crack them out, send them in the pcgs holders. Risk vs reward on this submission is huge in your favor, no brainer in my opinion.

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