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What is this?????????

Part of a loose collection I inherited, I found a dime that is smaller than a normal dime, thicker on the rim, but the same size in the center, because the rim is protruding. Someone please explain. Here are all of the images.



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    WilliamFWilliamF Posts: 832 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Weiss said:
    Post Mint Damage (PMD).
    Someone was tapping it with a spoon, or something harder. It was a common activity in the era of silver coins, in an effort to make the coin wide enough to form the foundation of a silver ring.

    @FishtailApple12 said:
    Who put this in as answered, nothing has been answered here guys

    This is the correct answer, if you are in the hobby long enough you will eventually have seen more of these than you can count.

    ."It's a dangerous business... going out your door. You step onto the road, and if you don't keep your feet, there's no knowing where you might be swept off to" -JRR Tolkien_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Outstanding BST transactions as a seller, buyer and trader with: ----- mustanggt, Kliao, claudewill87, MWallace, paesan, mpbuck82, moursund, basetsb, lordmarcovan, JWP, Coin hunter 4, COINS MAKE CENTS, PerryHall, Aspie_Rocco, Braddick, DBSTrader2, SanctionII, Histman, The_Dinosaur_Man, jesbroken, CentSearcher ------ANA Member #3214817

Answers

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    WeissWeiss Posts: 9,935 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited August 15, 2022 6:51PM

    Post Mint Damage (PMD).
    Someone was tapping it with a spoon, or something harder. It was a common activity in the era of silver coins, in an effort to make the coin wide enough to form the foundation of a silver ring.

    We are like children who look at print and see a serpent in the last letter but one, and a sword in the last.
    --Severian the Lame
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    @Weiss said:
    Post Mint Damage (PMD).
    Someone was tapping it with a spoon, or something harder. It was a common activity in the era of silver coins, in an effort to make the coin wide enough to form the foundation of a silver ring.

    It is not silver, it is thicker than a regular dime, and it doesn’t have a rigid rim. I don’t think that is the case

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    Who put this in as answered, nothing has been answered here guys

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    ifthevamzarockinifthevamzarockin Posts: 8,498 ✭✭✭✭✭

    PMD ;)

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    @ifthevamzarockin said:
    PMD ;)

    Could someone explain more than a “using a spoon”….

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    MasonGMasonG Posts: 6,268 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @FishtailApple12 said:

    @Weiss said:
    Post Mint Damage (PMD).
    Someone was tapping it with a spoon, or something harder. It was a common activity in the era of silver coins, in an effort to make the coin wide enough to form the foundation of a silver ring.

    It is not silver, it is thicker than a regular dime, and it doesn’t have a rigid rim. I don’t think that is the case

    You can tap a non-silver coin with a spoon, too. And it will make the rim thicker, just like if it was silver.

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    Why would someone do that though. I understand now i just don’t know why someone just tapped it with a spoon and didn’t even make a ring out of it

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    FredWeinbergFredWeinberg Posts: 5,720 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited August 15, 2022 7:14PM

    Damaged after it left the Mint, as noted above by numerous posters

    Retired Collector & Dealer in Major Mint Error Coins & Currency since the 1960's.Co-Author of Whitman's "100 Greatest U.S. Mint Error Coins", and the Error Coin Encyclopedia, Vols., III & IV. Retired Authenticator for Major Mint Errors
    for PCGS. A 49+-Year PNG Member...A full numismatist since 1972, retired in 2022
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    FredWeinbergFredWeinberg Posts: 5,720 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited August 15, 2022 7:15PM

    Damaged after it left the Mint, as noted above by numerous posters

    Retired Collector & Dealer in Major Mint Error Coins & Currency since the 1960's.Co-Author of Whitman's "100 Greatest U.S. Mint Error Coins", and the Error Coin Encyclopedia, Vols., III & IV. Retired Authenticator for Major Mint Errors
    for PCGS. A 49+-Year PNG Member...A full numismatist since 1972, retired in 2022
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    MasonGMasonG Posts: 6,268 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @FishtailApple12 said:
    Why would someone do that though. I understand now i just don’t know why someone just tapped it with a spoon and didn’t even make a ring out of it

    Because they just spent a couple of hours on it so far and realized they didn't want to finish.

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    WilliamFWilliamF Posts: 832 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @FishtailApple12 said:
    Why would someone do that though. I understand now i just don’t know why someone just tapped it with a spoon and didn’t even make a ring out of it

    They probably realized a dime just wasn't going to cut it and moved on to a bigger coin... ?

    ."It's a dangerous business... going out your door. You step onto the road, and if you don't keep your feet, there's no knowing where you might be swept off to" -JRR Tolkien_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Outstanding BST transactions as a seller, buyer and trader with: ----- mustanggt, Kliao, claudewill87, MWallace, paesan, mpbuck82, moursund, basetsb, lordmarcovan, JWP, Coin hunter 4, COINS MAKE CENTS, PerryHall, Aspie_Rocco, Braddick, DBSTrader2, SanctionII, Histman, The_Dinosaur_Man, jesbroken, CentSearcher ------ANA Member #3214817

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    MasonGMasonG Posts: 6,268 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @WilliamF said:

    @FishtailApple12 said:
    Why would someone do that though. I understand now i just don’t know why someone just tapped it with a spoon and didn’t even make a ring out of it

    They probably realized a dime just wasn't going to cut it and moved on to a bigger coin... ?

    That, too.

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    JBKJBK Posts: 14,745 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited August 15, 2022 7:30PM

    A lot of these "spooned" coins might axtually have been caught in a rotating machine such as a dryer.

    Either way, it's post mint damage.

    As for the "answered" notation on the second post, the OP set up the thread as a question so the next post is considered the answer.

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    WilliamFWilliamF Posts: 832 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @JBK said:
    A lot of these "spooned" coins might axtually have been caught in a rotating machine such as a dryer.

    Either way, it's post mint damage.

    As for the "answered" notation on the second post, the OP set up the thread as a question so the next post is considered the answer.

    I think it was actually marked as the answer by the OP, my post was 6 or 7 down the line until it was marked as the answer.
    Although actually it was @Weiss who had the right answer, I just quoted it in mine

    ."It's a dangerous business... going out your door. You step onto the road, and if you don't keep your feet, there's no knowing where you might be swept off to" -JRR Tolkien_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Outstanding BST transactions as a seller, buyer and trader with: ----- mustanggt, Kliao, claudewill87, MWallace, paesan, mpbuck82, moursund, basetsb, lordmarcovan, JWP, Coin hunter 4, COINS MAKE CENTS, PerryHall, Aspie_Rocco, Braddick, DBSTrader2, SanctionII, Histman, The_Dinosaur_Man, jesbroken, CentSearcher ------ANA Member #3214817

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    OldhoopsterOldhoopster Posts: 2,930 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Sometimes a coin like this can get stuck between a commercial dryer drum and outer wall. The tumbling can also cause this effect on a coin. They are called dryer coins.

    Here is the explanation from the errors-ref site. Don't forget to click on the link embedded in that explanation

    https://www.error-ref.com/?s=Dryer+coin

    Member of the ANA since 1982
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    jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,877 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @FishtailApple12 said:

    @Weiss said:
    Post Mint Damage (PMD).
    Someone was tapping it with a spoon, or something harder. It was a common activity in the era of silver coins, in an effort to make the coin wide enough to form the foundation of a silver ring.

    It is not silver, it is thicker than a regular dime, and it doesn’t have a rigid rim. I don’t think that is the case

    That is exactly the case. Historically it was done to make rings but it doesn't have to be done for that reason. By your own description that is exactly what happened: regular thickness in the middle, smaller diameter, thicker near the rim. Dinnertime intentionally pushed up the material from the outer edge which raised the outside edge while simultaneously decreasing the diameter.

    You can Google video of it.

    https://youtu.be/TAHtui3QvZE

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    rickoricko Posts: 98,724 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Used to see this frequently when I was in the Navy. Guys would be tap tap tapping away in spare time to make rings... for kids usually. Cheers, RickO

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    CommemDudeCommemDude Posts: 2,196 ✭✭✭✭✭



    Dr Mikey
    Commems and Early Type

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