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Thin 1942 Jefferson Nickel

Good morning. After my good fortune with the "skinny penny" I thought i would try my my luck with a thin nickel. The thin one is a 1942 (not sure if copper/nickel or silver alloy). It weighs 2.047 grams, is .044"/1.15 mm thick and .786" in diameter. Is it an error or the dreaded washing machine.



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    FredWeinbergFredWeinberg Posts: 5,722 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Acid treated

    Retired Collector & Dealer in Major Mint Error Coins & Currency since the 1960's.Co-Author of Whitman's "100 Greatest U.S. Mint Error Coins", and the Error Coin Encyclopedia, Vols., III & IV. Retired Authenticator for Major Mint Errors
    for PCGS. A 49+-Year PNG Member...A full numismatist since 1972, retired in 2022
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    Oh Fred!

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    I will note this on the flip so my kids don't ask the same question :)

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    jesbrokenjesbroken Posts: 9,303 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Looks like acid wash to me.
    Jim


    When a man who is honestly mistaken hears the truth, he will either quit being mistaken or cease to be honest....Abraham Lincoln

    Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it.....Mark Twain
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    JeffersonFrogJeffersonFrog Posts: 830 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The loss of thickness and diameter seem too extensive for any acid treatment, although the loss of detail would seem to rule out a Bert Hickman magnetically shrunk coin. It looks to me like the edges have been ground down to reduce the diameter. It does look like there has been some kind of surface treatment - the fourth picture almost looks like it's been hammered (literally). Who knows? I'd pay $0.50 for it just to add to my cull book.

    If we were all the same, the world would be an incredibly boring place.

    Tommy

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    rickoricko Posts: 98,724 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I have seen (actually was involved in) an acid treated nickel. A buddy of mine in AZ wanted to see what would happen and we put a nickel in sulfuric acid (H2so4) and let it sit. I forget exactly how long it was in the acid, but the surface and diameter was definitely reduced - and basically looked like the nickel in the OP. Cheers, RickO

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    MarkKelleyMarkKelley Posts: 1,760 ✭✭✭✭✭

    This is a type 1 coin (copper-nickel) and has been immersed in acid. Immersion will reduce the diameter as well as the thickness.

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    jesbrokenjesbroken Posts: 9,303 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The surface appears to tell the story. Looks like eaten away by an acid like substance completely over every pixel of the photo. No type of hammering or sanding would leave that appearance. JMO
    Jim


    When a man who is honestly mistaken hears the truth, he will either quit being mistaken or cease to be honest....Abraham Lincoln

    Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it.....Mark Twain

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