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Proof Mercury Dime & Walking Liberty Half NGC-PCGS crossover/grading

dunkleosteus430dunkleosteus430 Posts: 471 ✭✭✭✭
edited July 4, 2022 7:27PM in U.S. Coin Forum

On eBay, there are many proof mercury dimes and walking liberty halves graded by NGC as 67 or 68. These are often priced hundreds or even thousands of dollars less than the PCGS graded 67s and 68s. I am wondering if this is because PCGS is more strict regarding these issues or if it's just because NGC coins often just have a lower sale price for some reason. If one bought an NGC PF-68 Walker and tried to get a crossover to PCGS for the same grade, would it likely be successful or not? I'm just wondering because it does seem like many of the NGC graded proofs just seem to be of lesser quality than a PCGS coin at the same grade. Does anyone have experience with this, or had any crossover attempts, successful or unsuccessful? Any info is appreciated.

Two 1942 PR/PF-68 Walking Liberty Halves.

PCGS: virtually perfect, attractive original surfaces without much toning.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/373817532576?mkcid=16&mkevt=1&mkrid=711-127632-2357-0&ssspo=pEuWfRraS-u&sssrc=2349624&ssuid=ws-7tvnjshe&var=&widget_ver=artemis&media=COPY

NGC: Splotchy, unattractive toning that decreases eye appeal. Not too much going on otherwise.


https://www.ebay.com/itm/363526381799?mkcid=16&mkevt=1&mkrid=711-127632-2357-0&ssspo=Lq6VKG1wRa6&sssrc=2349624&ssuid=ws-7tvnjshe&var=&widget_ver=artemis&media=COPY

Yes, I am wondering this because of this discussion:
https://forums.collectors.com/discussion/1078045/where-are-all-the-walkers#latest
These Weinman designs are growing on me.

Happy 4th!

Young Numismatist

Comments

  • FlyingAlFlyingAl Posts: 2,845 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Woah, let's slow down. You gave NGC a hard time here, you chose one of the best 1942 proof halves in existence in PCGS plastic, the NGC coin just doesn't compare.

    As a side note, I find NGC is much stricter on these based on the coins I have in hand. That's a personal experience. However, proof grading CANNOT be done from pictures, ever. It's a rule that one must abide by.

    Let's break it down:

    PCGS coin: Fantastic details, even original toning, contrasted reverse (partially). This should go for a sizable premium.
    NGC coin: Weak detail, uneven toning, some haze. May or may not be a true 68. The coin should be a baseline for a lower priced 68. I instead offer this coin as a comparison:



    .
    .
    It's an NGC 68*. I would take this one over the PCGS coin now. Why, well it comes down to what makes these proofs special...

    Color...Detail...Contrast

    Look for those and you'll see the money follows. One last note if you will... when you get caught up in grade on these proofs, you will let some of the best coins pass by. I promise you. Don't ever buy these proofs because one is graded higher. Ever.

    Young Numismatist, Coin Photographer.

  • dunkleosteus430dunkleosteus430 Posts: 471 ✭✭✭✭

    Okay. I guess I did sort of look for a low end 68. You shared some great advice, and a beautiful coin. I haven't really started trying grading on anything until about a month ago. I watched some of the old PCGS grading webinars on YouTube today, and those have great information. I guess what I was really thinking was, why does there seem to be more high-grade proof walking liberty halves in NGC holders? Could it be because of grading fees or customizable holders? Sorry for my tone in the first post, I was just confused.

    Young Numismatist

  • FlyingAlFlyingAl Posts: 2,845 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @dunkleosteus430 said:
    Okay. I guess I did sort of look for a low end 68. You shared some great advice, and a beautiful coin. I haven't really started trying grading on anything until about a month ago. I watched some of the old PCGS grading webinars on YouTube today, and those have great information. I guess what I was really thinking was, why does there seem to be more high-grade proof walking liberty halves in NGC holders? Could it be because of grading fees or customizable holders? Sorry for my tone in the first post, I was just confused.

    I think that @TomB shared some exceptional advice.

    As to why it appears that NGC has more high graded coins, it's because there are. A quick look at the pop reports proves this, and there could be a few reasons. Perhaps NGC is a bit looser on 68s. Perhaps NGC just got the better coins. Perhaps NGC had a vast amount of crackouts when compared to PCGS. No one can know for sure. It's likely a combination of one or more factors.

    Remember, there are fantastic coins in both kinds of plastic. The hand plays to the collector here, you have an opportunity to cherrypick for the best of the best. It's up to you to find the knowledge that can allow you to do this, and most importantly have the patience to do so. It will take years to find a perfect coin for you. Use that time to search every thread here and read every bit of it. Ask questions as frequently as possible as well, but make sure that the answer isn't right in front of you when you search the forums. Good luck!

    Young Numismatist, Coin Photographer.

  • gumby1234gumby1234 Posts: 5,425 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Buy the coin not the holder.

    Successful BST with ad4400, Kccoin, lablover, pointfivezero, koynekwest, jwitten, coin22lover, HalfDimeDude, erwindoc, jyzskowsi, COINS MAKE CENTS, AlanSki, BryceM

  • MFeldMFeld Posts: 12,020 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited July 5, 2022 4:30AM

    ... If one bought an NGC PF-68 Walker and tried to get a crossover to PCGS for the same grade, would it likely be successful or not?..."

    Odds are very strongly against it, for a couple of reasons.
    One is, that because of the large differences in price, many owners of such coins have already tried to cross them over into PCGS holders. Another is, that while there are certainly a good number of exceptions, PCGS tends to be stricter in its grading of those coins.

    Mark Feld* of Heritage Auctions*Unless otherwise noted, my posts here represent my personal opinions.

  • rickoricko Posts: 98,724 ✭✭✭✭✭

    As indicated above, evaluating proof coins, to be effective, must be done 'in hand'. One must understand grading, examine all points (strike, details, luster, hairlines etc.), and make your decision. Eye appeal is subjective, and will differ among collectors. Cheers, RickO

  • logger7logger7 Posts: 8,069 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I remember in an interview years ago with Maurice Rosen for his newsletter, Mark Salzberg from NGC talked about a high grade Walker their competitor had graded 68 as being a problem as they had graded it 67. He also mentioned the software they have to alert them to high grades like that before they go out the door. So it cuts both ways; strictness and grading go hand in hand.

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