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Is the PCGS rarity scale is relevant these days

rooksmithrooksmith Posts: 972 ✭✭✭✭
edited November 8, 2021 3:22AM in Q & A Forum

https://www.pcgs.com/coinfacts/rarity-scale/96842
I am interested in whether the PCGS rarity scale is relevant for modern coin collectors. Survival estimation is difficult when they are not being released into circulation. For example, there were many Kennedy Half dollars that were not proof,ie., were production strikes, that dont merit grading due to the high cost of grading. However PCGS bulk grading requirements can incentivize dealers to make bulk submissions. Huge quantities of high quality new graded coins can come on the market for a date that is thinly populated PCGS wise, but heavily minted, that are therefore by no means rare. Can someone esplain this market to me. The market for the highest of the high grades is a huge jump, from say, 64 to 65 for production strikes or 69 to 70 for proof strikes. Remember that the longer a series goes on the more difficult it is to achieve a highly graded PCGS graded set.

“When you don't know what you're talking about, it's hard to know when you're finished.” - Tommy Smothers

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    gumby1234gumby1234 Posts: 5,428 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Yes I think the rarity scale applies to modern coins as well. Most modern coins would be considered very common. The 75 no S dime is not one of the common ones thou. Most moderns are even very common in almost every MS grade. In PCGS when you look at a specific coin in the info somewhere is the rarity scale for all surviving specimens, then for MS60 and higher and then again for MS65 and higher. You can get a good idea how many are available in a grade you want to pursue. Say you want a 1921 Standing Liberty Quarter in MS65. PCGS has it listed as rarity 7 with 200 estimated survivors in MS 65 or better.

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    rooksmithrooksmith Posts: 972 ✭✭✭✭

    My intuition tells me that rarity is one factor which affects value , but if each coin is competing for attention in a market place there are bound to be those coins that are common yet difficult in high grades. As people submit coins and try to meet or beat the highest priced coins, they will deflate or inflate the prices for that coin/variety etc. A beat is so rare, and getting one grade lower than expected is common.

    Many collectors eventually learn that its hard for the common man to succeed at the grading game. Dealers on the other hand, who have a good eye, and are set up for doing submissions can make a little money. But I think that dealers make more money on buying coins from unsuspecting widows nephews and nieces who dont know anything about those funny plastic slabs, or the numbers we call grades.

    “When you don't know what you're talking about, it's hard to know when you're finished.” - Tommy Smothers
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    rooksmithrooksmith Posts: 972 ✭✭✭✭
    edited September 13, 2021 5:36PM

    I'm going forward in aquiring coins with a combinaton of lower population, and rarity with an extra factor of expensive coins to begin with. More gold, less silver. key dates. (Hyperinflation is Real)

    “When you don't know what you're talking about, it's hard to know when you're finished.” - Tommy Smothers
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    WAYNEASWAYNEAS Posts: 6,352 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @rooksmith said:
    I'm going forward in aquiring coins with a combinaton of lower population, and rarity with an extra factor of expensive coins to begin with. More gold, less silver. key dates. (Hyperinflation is Real)

    Let us know how you make out especially with your first couple of purchases.
    As you have stated, it is going to be expensive matching your requirements.
    Wayne

    Kennedys are my quest...

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