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Drilled holes in old coins. Which side did they start on?

JimsokayJimsokay Posts: 105 ✭✭✭

First, just getting back into coins after many decades away and with finding this forum I have learned an amazing amount about coins, thanks!

Question is when old coins where drilled many years ago, which side did they start on? The crude holes show an expansion on one side as if the metal was "pushed" aside while making the hole. I'm guessing that's the exit side, but still a guess.

There's so much knowledge in this forum I am sure some people know the answer. TIA!


Comments

  • tincuptincup Posts: 4,665 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I would agree with your premise that the buildup of metal would likely be the exit.

    ----- kj
  • NysotoNysoto Posts: 3,717 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Holed coins can have the hole started on either side and anywhere around the periphery, but the most common is 12:00 obverse. They are often punched rather than drilled, some have square holes from early square or rectangular nails. Your coin is punched.

    Robert Scot: Engraving Liberty - biography of US Mint's first chief engraver
  • JimsokayJimsokay Posts: 105 ✭✭✭

    @Nysoto said:
    Holed coins can have the hole started on either side and anywhere around the periphery, but the most common is 12:00 obverse. They are often punched rather than drilled, some have square holes from early square or rectangular nails. Your coin is punched.

    That's very interesting regarding square holes. I've seen those square like punches and that makes sense!

    On the above image the the obverse appears pretty round though no conclusion if was rounded a bit after puncture. Thanks for the feedback!

  • JimsokayJimsokay Posts: 105 ✭✭✭

    @Kliao said:
    On this coin I would guess they started on the obverse because of the extra metal around the hole on the reverse.

    Thanks Kliao and Tincup!

  • YoloBagelsYoloBagels Posts: 151 ✭✭✭

    Any emphasis on how/what tools people used to hole coins back then?

  • NysotoNysoto Posts: 3,717 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Jimsokay:

    On the above image the the obverse appears pretty round though no conclusion if was rounded a bit after puncture.

    It was probably punched with an early wire nail which started to replace rectangular nails starting around 1850.

    Robert Scot: Engraving Liberty - biography of US Mint's first chief engraver
  • JimsokayJimsokay Posts: 105 ✭✭✭

    @Nysoto said:
    @Jimsokay:

    On the above image the the obverse appears pretty round though no conclusion if was rounded a bit after puncture.

    It was probably punched with an early wire nail which started to replace rectangular nails starting around 1850.

    Interesting as I have a bunch of square nails I got years ago and never knew the time frame of them. Thanks!

  • rickoricko Posts: 98,724 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Many cents were punched by nails because they were put over the front door based on the superstition that it would 'Welcome money in'.... Cheers, RickO

  • 1630Boston1630Boston Posts: 13,665 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Never thought of this

    not sure if true

    In America, coins were used for a period as washers for slate roofs. Buildings materials suppliers tried to push the price of washers up from a quarter of a cent each to over 2 cents, so builders started to drill large holes in pennies and use them instead.

    from https://www.buysilver.org/blog/coins-with-holes/

    Successful transactions with : MICHAELDIXON, Manorcourtman, Bochiman, bolivarshagnasty, AUandAG, onlyroosies, chumley, Weiss, jdimmick, BAJJERFAN, gene1978, TJM965, Smittys, GRANDAM, JTHawaii, mainejoe, softparade, derryb

    Bad transactions with : nobody to date

  • JimsokayJimsokay Posts: 105 ✭✭✭

    @ricko said:
    Many cents were punched by nails because they were put over the front door based on the superstition that it would 'Welcome money in'.... Cheers, RickO

    I knew people would wear them as jewelry, but never heard that.

    My dad always said “it’s bad luck to be superstitious”. ;)

  • JimsokayJimsokay Posts: 105 ✭✭✭

    @1630Boston said:
    Never thought of this

    not sure if true

    In America, coins were used for a period as washers for slate roofs. Buildings materials suppliers tried to push the price of washers up from a quarter of a cent each to over 2 cents, so builders started to drill large holes in pennies and use them instead.

    from https://www.buysilver.org/blog/coins-with-holes/

    Thanks! Anything is possible.

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