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Not a coin I know…..

wayfarerwayfarer Posts: 90 ✭✭✭
edited April 8, 2021 12:04PM in U.S. & World Currency Forum

…. however an interesting numismatic piece for me. I like the items with the native Americans.
Difficult to get in Europe. Bought it at a Heritage auction.

I was amazed at the very thin paper. Could these banknotes really get in circulation without tearing?
My piece is about uncirculated, does that mean these are leftovers?
I would appreciate if you post any notes, tokens or coins with native Americans.


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    jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,877 ✭✭✭✭✭

    It is signed so it probably left the bank.

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    JBKJBK Posts: 14,745 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The paper was thin but strong. I think people carried large billfolds (wallets) back then.

    Agree that it would not be a remainder as it is signed.

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    PerryHallPerryHall Posts: 45,405 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Signed, dated, and serial numbered means it's not a remainder. Nice attractive note.

    Worry is the interest you pay on a debt you may not owe.

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    rickoricko Posts: 98,724 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Nice specimen..... I have often looked at notes at coin shows when I attended in the PNW. I really liked the five dollar Indian notes. Very expensive. Cheers, RickO

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    JimnightJimnight Posts: 10,812 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Very nice!

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    jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,877 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @JBK said:
    The paper was thin but strong. I think people carried large billfolds (wallets) back then.

    Agree that it would not be a remainder as it is signed.

    @PerryHall said:
    Signed, dated, and serial numbered means it's not a remainder. Nice attractive note.

    I would still go with "probably". I've seen full, uncut sheets that were signed and S/N. I think some banks did them in advance of actual release.

    https://currency.ha.com/itm/obsolete-banknotes/sault-de-st-marys-mi-bank-of-chippeway-10-5-3-2-jan-3-1838-g10-g6-g4-g2-x1-lee-sau-1-8-5-3-1-uncut-sheet/a/3526-19384.s?ic4=ListView-ShortDescription-071515

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    291fifth291fifth Posts: 23,936 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The paper used for those notes was of very high quality. It may be thin but it held up very well.

    All glory is fleeting.
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    AUandAGAUandAG Posts: 24,536 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Love the ink transfer to the back....

    Nice note.

    bob :)

    Registry: CC lowballs (boblindstrom), bobinvegas1989@yahoo.com
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    sellitstoresellitstore Posts: 2,482 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited April 9, 2021 4:59AM

    You are both right. Fully signed, dated and numbered means the note is classified as issued, however, it may not have actually been in circulation. The bank may have handed this note to the depositor and it never circulated beyond that.

    Indians are a commonly collected theme on these obsolete notes. Trains, ship, dogs or other animals, $2s or $3s are other common collecting themes. Any of these collections would never be complete and the goal should be to assemble as many different designs as possible. Hundreds of notes in each of these categories can be had in the $25-$50 range and most are rarer than the 1899 $5 silver certificate (with Indian portrait) which sells at 10X (or more) the price due to demand.

    The red "ONE" is called a protector and is printed on both sides. The purpose was to make it difficult to alter the denomination to a higher one by adding a "0" or two.

    The paper is strong because it's made from linen rags. They didn't know how to make bad (cheap) paper yet, from trees. The paper is surprisingly strong but took a beating in circulation. Low grade obsoletes are some of the ugliest things you can imagine but usually can be improved significantly. As with ancients, it's an area of numismatics where restoration is not only acceptable, but necessary to make an item collectible or saleable.

    Below are a few Tennessee notes with Indians:




    Collector and dealer in obsolete currency. Always buying all obsolete bank notes and scrip.
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    wayfarerwayfarer Posts: 90 ✭✭✭

    Many thanks for your interesting answers.
    I found it very instructive, learnt a lot from it.

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    SaorAlbaSaorAlba Posts: 7,475 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I've always thought it a bit curious that Native Americans were even depicted on money, particularly so given their perceived lower status as human beings in the 19th century. This $20 from the Series of 1875 National depicts the "Baptism of Pocahontas".

    In memory of my kitty Seryozha 14.2.1996 ~ 13.9.2016 and Shadow 3.4.2015 - 16.4.21
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    wayfarerwayfarer Posts: 90 ✭✭✭

    Nice one, many thanks for sharing!

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    sellitstoresellitstore Posts: 2,482 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited April 10, 2021 6:28AM

    I've always thought it a bit curious that Native Americans were even depicted on money, particularly so given their perceived lower status as human beings in the 19th century. This $20 from the Series of 1875 National depicts the "Baptism of Pocahontas".

    I understand that but the belief that the savages could be saved by Baptism probably was a strong factor in how Indians were treated and depicted. Conversion to Christianity made them worthy humans in the eyes of 19th century Americans.

    Collector and dealer in obsolete currency. Always buying all obsolete bank notes and scrip.
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