Found this toned color dime yesterday.

Maserati27Maserati27 Posts: 47 ✭✭
edited December 30, 2019 3:22AM in U.S. Coin Forum


Got after I received change from grocery store @ the self-checkout.
Is this dime worth anything to someone? The back of the coin looks like shi compared to this side, so didn’t bother posting. But anyways... hmm

Comments

  • HemisphericalHemispherical Posts: 9,295 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Environmental exposure. Worth the change you got it for.

  • Moxie15Moxie15 Posts: 138 ✭✭✭

    @Hemispherical said:
    Environmental exposure.

    well that describes all toned coins. If that coin was uncirculated and experienced the same 'environmental Exposure' many would drool over it.

  • JimnightJimnight Posts: 3,359 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Nice!

  • rickoricko Posts: 71,027 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Just a common dime that has been environmentally damaged...All tarnish is environmental damage...Cheers, RickO

  • abcde12345abcde12345 Posts: 1,968 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The "Joseph Stalin" variety.

    I want people to be afraid of how much they love me.

  • blitzdudeblitzdude Posts: 2,216 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Worth 10 cents and in desperate need of a bath in the Weimans. Congrats!

  • joeykoinsjoeykoins Posts: 4,319 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited December 31, 2019 10:03AM

    Environmental Exposure.

    <3 $$$$$$$$$$$

    "Jesus died for you and for me"Thank you,Jesus!!!

    --- If it should happen I die and leave this world and you want to remember me. Please only remember my opening Sig Line.
  • @blitzdude said:
    Worth 10 cents and in desperate need of a bath in the Weimans. Congrats!

    @blitzdude said:
    Worth 10 cents and in desperate need of a bath in the Weimans. Congrats!

    Okay thank you whatever

  • clarkbar04clarkbar04 Posts: 3,971 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited December 30, 2019 3:03PM

    @ricko said:
    Just a common dime that has been environmentally damaged...All tarnish is environmental damage...Cheers, RickO

    Absolutely false.

    To the OP, you have both of the 2 most outspoken anti toning crew in here, take their posts with a grain of salt the size of Gibraltar when it concerns color.

    MS66 taste on an MS63 budget.
  • divecchiadivecchia Posts: 5,618 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The piece has value for sure. To me and other folks that look at toning as environmental damage it is worth 10 cents. To the collectors that love color it may be worth many times that as it has some beautiful color. To find out, just put it up on BST and the people that really like it can pay up for it.

    Just remember if you like it and looking at it makes you happy, then it is a nice find no matter what anyone else thinks.

    Collect what you like and Happy Collecting.

    Donato

    Hobbyist & Collector (not an investor).
    Nolan Ryan Master Set ---- Nolan Ryan Topps Master Set
  • 291fifth291fifth Posts: 18,230 ✭✭✭✭✭

    If you can find anyone who will pay more than 10 cents for it take the money and run!

    All glory is fleeting.
  • rickoricko Posts: 71,027 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @clarkbar04 ....You can like, love or adore tarnish....However, it is absolutely fact, that tarnish is - and always will be - environmental damage.....That is reality. Cheers, RickO

  • erwindocerwindoc Posts: 3,116 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I personally like the color. Unfortunately, its been circulated and its worth only face, especially if the reverse is damaged. If I would have found it, Id probably put it in a flip or a folder for storage. Thanks for sharing the find!

  • CoinJunkieCoinJunkie Posts: 5,448 ✭✭✭

    @ricko said:
    @clarkbar04 ....You can like, love or adore tarnish....However, it is absolutely fact, that tarnish is - and always will be - environmental damage.....That is reality. Cheers, RickO

    Oy vey. I just exchanged several PMs with another forum member refuting this nonsensical notion. First of all, the widely accepted vernacular of numismatics (and of PCGS) does NOT conflate toning (or "tarnish") with environmental damage. I know it's fashionable for people to spout "alternative facts" and abuse standard English in service of personal agendas, but it does a disservice to both communication and truth. Read George Orwell.

    Secondly, per the Oxford online dictionary, "damage" to something impairs its value (or utility, which isn't so relevant to collectibles). Toning may decrease, have little effect, or greatly increase a coin's value on a case by case basis. So a beautifully toned coin which commands a premium over a generic white example cannot properly be called "damaged". Q.E.D.

  • abcde12345abcde12345 Posts: 1,968 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @ricko said:
    @clarkbar04...You can like, love or adore tarnish...However, it is an absolute fact, that tarnish is - and always will be - environmental damage.....That is reality. Cheers, RickO

    No damage. The toning protects the coin from damage.

    I want people to be afraid of how much they love me.

  • CoinJunkieCoinJunkie Posts: 5,448 ✭✭✭

    Addendum: If "tarnish" always impairs a coin's value to you, then yes, you may consider all tarnished coins to be "damaged". This would properly be termed "your personal preference" and not "absolutely fact". Again, the leading TPG does not agree with you.

  • BryceMBryceM Posts: 8,453 ✭✭✭✭✭

    It’s a semantic argument and both sides can easy defend their position. One who studies the coin market or human behavior will conclude that certain types of toning enhance a coin’s desirability. Those who see the world through the lens of a chemist, engineer, or metallurgist will see corrosion of the surface, resultant to a reaction of the coin’s molecular surface with molecules from its environment.

    Me? I’m a scientist who understands that “oooooh pretty” can’t be scientifically explained.

    The most original coin is the one that is exactly as it was when it left the mint. :)

  • CoinJunkieCoinJunkie Posts: 5,448 ✭✭✭

    @BryceM said:
    It’s a semantic argument and both sides can easy defend their position. One who studies the coin market or human behavior will conclude that certain types of toning enhance a coin’s desirability. Those who see the world through the lens of a chemist, engineer, or metallurgist will see corrosion of the surface, resultant to a reaction of the coin’s molecular surface with molecules from its environment.

    Me? I’m a scientist who understands that “oooooh pretty” can’t be scientifically explained.

    The most original coin is the one that is exactly as it was when it left the mint. :)

    If you are a scientist (as am I), then you know that nothing is exactly as it was even a nanosecond ago. Sure, every non-inert material is constantly undergoing reactions with its environment. So what? Is the result of every chemical reaction properly termed "damage"? If you want to refute what I actually wrote, please feel free to do so. B)

  • CoinJunkieCoinJunkie Posts: 5,448 ✭✭✭
    edited December 30, 2019 8:47PM

    Or to take a different tack: Please choose A. or B. below.

    A. A blast white silver coin's appearance is due to a complete lack of oxidation on its surface.

    B. A blast white silver coin's appearance is due to its surface oxidation layer being non-refractive to light reflecting
    off the coin's surface.

    Unless A) is true, all silver coins are "damaged" according to the RickO definition,

    Q.E.D.

  • emeraldATVemeraldATV Posts: 731 ✭✭✭

    You've now entered into The Follow Your Heart zone.
    Trust your eyes.
    Follow your spectrum of liking.
    As long as you,ve not cleaned, brushed or manufactured said peice (coin)
    Its a keeper so do the research outside the box.
    Reason is, I dont think there is a box.
    Toning is a personal preference.

    B)

  • CoinJunkieCoinJunkie Posts: 5,448 ✭✭✭

    Academic digressions aside, the OP's coin doesn't merit much of a toning premium, IMO. Put it in a drawer with other curios if you are so inclined. Or put it on eBay and hope for an irrational buyer.

  • Wahoo554Wahoo554 Posts: 360 ✭✭✭✭

    If the other side matched you could maybe sell it on eBay for a few bucks. With the reverse looking bad, doubt it has any value to toned coin collectors.

  • CoinscratchFeverCoinscratchFever Posts: 1,390 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The best part of that toned coin is that it got your attention.
    Happy Hunting :)

  • blitzdudeblitzdude Posts: 2,216 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @CoinJunkie said:
    Or to take a different tack: Please choose A. or B. below.

    A. A blast white silver coin's appearance is due to a complete lack of oxidation on its surface.

    B. A blast white silver coin's appearance is due to its surface oxidation layer being non-refractive to light reflecting
    off the coin's surface.

    Unless A) is true, all silver coins are "damaged" according to the RickO definition,

    Q.E.D.

    The best part about the whole thing is this environmental damage can be easily reversed. All it takes is 5 seconds and a $3.99 bottle of Weimans.

  • clarkbar04clarkbar04 Posts: 3,971 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited December 30, 2019 10:27PM

    @blitzdude said:

    @CoinJunkie said:
    Or to take a different tack: Please choose A. or B. below.

    A. A blast white silver coin's appearance is due to a complete lack of oxidation on its surface.

    B. A blast white silver coin's appearance is due to its surface oxidation layer being non-refractive to light reflecting
    off the coin's surface.

    Unless A) is true, all silver coins are "damaged" according to the RickO definition,

    Q.E.D.

    The best part about the whole thing is this environmental damage can be easily reversed. All it takes is 5 seconds and a $3.99 bottle of Weimans.

    If it can be reversed then it was never damaged.

    Still 100% wrong.

    Does insurance total your car out when it gets muddy?

    MS66 taste on an MS63 budget.
  • clarkbar04clarkbar04 Posts: 3,971 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @ricko said:
    @clarkbar04 ....You can like, love or adore tarnish....However, it is absolutely fact, that tarnish is - and always will be - environmental damage.....That is reality. Cheers, RickO

    What’s the factual basis beyond your ad nauseam disdain for toned coins?

    TPGs disagree wit you.
    Entire markets disagree with you.

    MS66 taste on an MS63 budget.
  • blitzdudeblitzdude Posts: 2,216 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @clarkbar04 said:

    @blitzdude said:

    @CoinJunkie said:
    Or to take a different tack: Please choose A. or B. below.

    A. A blast white silver coin's appearance is due to a complete lack of oxidation on its surface.

    B. A blast white silver coin's appearance is due to its surface oxidation layer being non-refractive to light reflecting
    off the coin's surface.

    Unless A) is true, all silver coins are "damaged" according to the RickO definition,

    Q.E.D.

    The best part about the whole thing is this environmental damage can be easily reversed. All it takes is 5 seconds and a $3.99 bottle of Weimans.

    If it can be reversed then it was never damaged.

    Still 100% wrong.

    Does insurance total your car out when it gets muddy?

    No sir, I take it to the carwash to rid it of the nasty. The Weimens does the same thing on toners. You should try it sometime, it's an amazing product.

  • clarkbar04clarkbar04 Posts: 3,971 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @blitzdude said:

    @clarkbar04 said:

    @blitzdude said:

    @CoinJunkie said:
    Or to take a different tack: Please choose A. or B. below.

    A. A blast white silver coin's appearance is due to a complete lack of oxidation on its surface.

    B. A blast white silver coin's appearance is due to its surface oxidation layer being non-refractive to light reflecting
    off the coin's surface.

    Unless A) is true, all silver coins are "damaged" according to the RickO definition,

    Q.E.D.

    The best part about the whole thing is this environmental damage can be easily reversed. All it takes is 5 seconds and a $3.99 bottle of Weimans.

    If it can be reversed then it was never damaged.

    Still 100% wrong.

    Does insurance total your car out when it gets muddy?

    No sir, I take it to the carwash to rid it of the nasty. The Weimens does the same thing on toners. You should try it sometime, it's an amazing product.

    I’ll let you dip money off your coins. To advocate others should do the same is foolish.

    MS66 taste on an MS63 budget.
  • CoinJunkieCoinJunkie Posts: 5,448 ✭✭✭

    You guys may be discussing apples and oranges. Some toning is butt ugly, in which case a dip has been known to increase a coin's marketability and value. What I'm rejecting are dogmatic blanket statements that all toning is "damage".

  • clarkbar04clarkbar04 Posts: 3,971 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @CoinJunkie said:
    You guys may be discussing apples and oranges. Some toning is butt ugly, in which case a dip has been known to increase a coin's marketability and value. What I'm rejecting are dogmatic blanket statements that all toning is "damage".

    Same.

    But, considering the source(s) I know it’s all encompassing. Blitzy would suggest dipping the sunnywood morgan set.

    MS66 taste on an MS63 budget.
  • CoinJunkieCoinJunkie Posts: 5,448 ✭✭✭

    @clarkbar04 said:

    @CoinJunkie said:
    You guys may be discussing apples and oranges. Some toning is butt ugly, in which case a dip has been known to increase a coin's marketability and value. What I'm rejecting are dogmatic blanket statements that all toning is "damage".

    Same.

    But, considering the source(s) I know it’s all encompassing. Blitzy would suggest dipping the sunnywood morgan set.

    That would be a crime against nature... literally! :/

  • CoinHoarderCoinHoarder Posts: 155 ✭✭✭

    People are free to collect what they want. However, I have zero interest in cupronickel coins with or without toning.

    Is this dime worth anything to someone? Not to me.

  • rickoricko Posts: 71,027 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @clarkbar04....My background in chemistry and metallurgy are the basis for knowing that tarnish is environmental damage. It is the molecular joining of a pure metal with environmental contaminants (i.e. sulfur and others). When not exposed to contaminants, no tarnish....therefore, exposure results in tarnish - ergo, environmental damage. It is science. Do some research, it really is interesting. Cheers, RickO

  • Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. If you like it who cares what anybody else thinks.

  • HemisphericalHemispherical Posts: 9,295 ✭✭✭✭✭

    This thread went OT.

    Hopefully it get’s back in track by next year...

    Happy New Year!

  • coinbufcoinbuf Posts: 5,359 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Hemispherical said:
    This thread went OT.

    Hopefully it get’s back in track by next year...

    Happy New Year!

    Rarely do you see a thread longer than 10 posts that does stay on topic. :D

    So @CoinJunkie as you are a self proclaimed expert in the area of toning perhaps you would care to explain how we arrive at the stage of terminal toning if toning is not damaging a coins surface?

    My Lincoln Registry
    My Collection of Old Holders

    Never a slave to one plastic brand will I ever be.
  • CoinJunkieCoinJunkie Posts: 5,448 ✭✭✭

    @coinbuf said:

    @Hemispherical said:
    This thread went OT.

    Hopefully it get’s back in track by next year...

    Happy New Year!

    Rarely do you see a thread longer than 10 posts that does stay on topic. :D

    So @CoinJunkie as you are a self proclaimed expert in the area of toning perhaps you would care to explain how we arrive at the stage of terminal toning if toning is not damaging a coins surface?

    Sure, my pleasure.

    Patient A and Patient B are both suffering from the same ailment. They go to the same doctor and get prescribed the same medication. Patient A takes the proper dosage and gets well. Patient B overdoses and dies. By your logic, Patient A was "damaged" by the medication.

  • coinbufcoinbuf Posts: 5,359 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited December 31, 2019 8:44AM

    Sure, my pleasure.

    Patient A and Patient B are both suffering from the same ailment. They go to the same doctor and get prescribed the same medication. Patient A takes the proper dosage and gets well. Patient B overdoses and dies. By your logic, Patient A was "damaged" by the medication.

    First I provided no logic I asked you (someone how has stated that he is a scientist and a self proclaimed expert on toning) to explain how terminal toning can occur if toning doesn't (according to you and one other expert on this thread) damage the coins surface. As all I got was sarcasm and no actual scientific explanation I can conclude that you have no idea what your talking about, which is what I thought from the start. Thanks for the clarification.

    My Lincoln Registry
    My Collection of Old Holders

    Never a slave to one plastic brand will I ever be.
  • BLUEJAYWAYBLUEJAYWAY Posts: 4,052 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I wish the Statue of Liberty never "Toned".

    Successful transactions:Tookybandit
  • CoinJunkieCoinJunkie Posts: 5,448 ✭✭✭

    ,> @coinbuf said:

    Sure, my pleasure.

    Patient A and Patient B are both suffering from the same ailment. They go to the same doctor and get prescribed the same medication. Patient A takes the proper dosage and gets well. Patient B overdoses and dies. By your logic, Patient A was "damaged" by the medication.

    First I provided no logic I asked you (someone how has stated that he is a scientist and a self proclaimed expert on toning) to explain how terminal toning can occur if toning doesn't (according to you and one other expert on this thread) damage the coins surface. As all I got was sarcasm and no actual scientific explanation I can conclude that you have no idea what your talking about, which is what I thought from the start. Thanks for the clarification.

    It wasn't sarcasm; it was an analogy. Have you ever heard of the phrases "a matter of degree" or "too much of a good thing"? So let's turn the tables here: perhaps you would care to explain how we arrive at the stage of a charred cake if heat is not damaging a cake's surface?

  • coinbufcoinbuf Posts: 5,359 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @CoinJunkie said:

    It wasn't sarcasm; it was an analogy. Have you ever heard of the phrases "a matter of degree" or "too much of a good thing"? So let's turn the tables here: perhaps you would care to explain how we arrive at the stage of a charred cake if heat is not damaging a cake's surface?

    I didn't ask for an analogy I asked you (the self proclaimed scientist expert on toning) to provide the science behind how terminal toning can occur if that process is not damaging the surface of the coin. This would be a nice learning exercise for the forum, but as you are unable to provide this your credibility as a scientist and expert on coin toning seem very much in doubt. Very unfortunate as this could have been a great learning tool for all the forum members.

    Also cakes are not made of metal so you comparison of apples to oranges further calls into question your claim of a science background imo.

    My Lincoln Registry
    My Collection of Old Holders

    Never a slave to one plastic brand will I ever be.
  • CoinJunkieCoinJunkie Posts: 5,448 ✭✭✭

    @coinbuf said:

    @CoinJunkie said:

    It wasn't sarcasm; it was an analogy. Have you ever heard of the phrases "a matter of degree" or "too much of a good thing"? So let's turn the tables here: perhaps you would care to explain how we arrive at the stage of a charred cake if heat is not damaging a cake's surface?

    I didn't ask for an analogy I asked you (the self proclaimed scientist expert on toning) to provide the science behind how terminal toning can occur if that process is not damaging the surface of the coin. This would be a nice learning exercise for the forum, but as you are unable to provide this your credibility as a scientist and expert on coin toning seem very much in doubt. Very unfortunate as this could have been a great learning tool for all the forum members.

    Also cakes are not made of metal so you comparison of apples to oranges further calls into question your claim of a science background imo.

    You're right. I'm a total fraud. I didn't even graduate high school, and I don't own any of the coins I've posted here over the last many years. Furthermore, I'm dumb as a rock and have a team of monkeys who actually compose my posts. I figured someone would eventually see through me. Congratulations, you did it! I will be sending you a freshly dipped (undamaged!) Morgan dollar as a token of your accomplishment. May you get years of pleasure staring at its scrubbed, glistening beauty. Truly, to the victor goes the spoils. I can only hope that with the passage of time you will forgive me for not meeting your (completely reasonable) standards. I'll try to do better in my next lifetime.

    All the best, CJ

  • joeykoinsjoeykoins Posts: 4,319 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @ricko said:
    @clarkbar04 ....You can like, love or adore tarnish....However, it is absolutely fact, that tarnish is - and always will be - environmental damage.....That is reality. Cheers, RickO

    We can actually say the same for us humans. As time goes by, we too become, "environmental damaged". ;)

    "Jesus died for you and for me"Thank you,Jesus!!!

    --- If it should happen I die and leave this world and you want to remember me. Please only remember my opening Sig Line.
  • Dave99BDave99B Posts: 6,472 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Love how this thread has morphed! :)

    I'll have to side with PCGS on this one. PCGS does NOT straight grade damaged coins.

    Happy New Year everyone!
    Dave

    Always looking for original, better date VF20-VF35 Barber quarters and halves, and a quality beer.
  • crazyhounddogcrazyhounddog Posts: 10,798 ✭✭✭✭✭

    This is an argument that there will be no winners. No one will come out of this victorious. As long as I’ve been a member here this same argument surfaces more often than I can count.
    Be happy with what you collect. Live and let live.

    The bitterness of "poor quality" is remembered long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten.
  • emeraldATVemeraldATV Posts: 731 ✭✭✭

    @crazyhounddog said:
    This is an argument that there will be no winners. No one will come out of this victorious. As long as I’ve been a member here this same argument surfaces more often than I can count.
    Be happy with what you collect. Live and let live.

    "Please don't take me to the car wash"

    B)

  • emeraldATVemeraldATV Posts: 731 ✭✭✭

    Environmental damage ?

    B)

  • privatecoinprivatecoin Posts: 850 ✭✭✭✭

    I'll say again, how many coins are artificially white?

    Everyone has a preference and best to leave it at that.

    Paper money eventually returns to its intrinsic value. Zero. Voltaire

  • Well thanks for the input guys. I am glad I can use this thread when I am unsure about things since I’m still learning everyday

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